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 Post subject: Tips!
PostPosted: Thu Feb 24, 2005 12:58 am 
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Joined: Wed Feb 02, 2005 7:19 pm
Posts: 207
Location: Halifax
What are some techniques you've discovered to make travelling (road trips, airplanes, whatever!) with allergies more stress-free?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Mar 04, 2005 12:25 pm 
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Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 9:38 pm
Posts: 1643
Location: Toronto
If travelling by car - get a really good cooler. Fill it. Always make sure you have more safe food then you actually need to bring.

We usually try to find a place with a fridge and stove or microwave. When we go on vacation (2 day drive) we spend one night in a hotel, so we bring two days worth of food - all to be eaten cold. We also bring an electric kettle - that way we can make coffee or instant soup.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Mar 04, 2005 4:57 pm 
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Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 9:10 pm
Posts: 121
Location: Charlottesville, VA
I love my cooler. For long trips, I might take one that runs off the accessory plug (cigarette lighter) and actually stays chilled.

I always take butter, cheese, and salad dressing. At the very least, if a place can give me a safe baked potato and simple salad, I can dress them myself! We already carry food for my hypglycemic husband, so throwing in stuff that will allow me to eat out more easily is useful.

From spring through fall, I have a ready-to-go stash of homemade trail mix and nuts to carry while hiking. I mix it up to order when we go on winter hikes (different energy needs, less frequent outings).

I also take less traditional travel-snack foods. I toss frozen peas into a baggie. When they're thawed out, but still cold, they're a great snack. They remind me of eating peas fresh out of the garden as a kid. With a bit of safe mayo, tomato, and cheese, I can have a pea salad. I balance a cup of hummus between my legs and dip carrot sticks or tortilla chips in it. I make veggie sushi (maki rolls) and take a small bit of rice vinegar to moisten the rolls when I'm hungry. I pop popcorn ahead of time and take it in large bags.

I always take safe-for-me wet wipes to wipe down train and plane seats. I've had contact reactions from residue and no trip is fun when one is covered in hives.

And I always have water with me--either gallons in the trunk or a couple bottles with me. That way, if I get exposed to something, I can quickly drench my hands or any other exposed body part.

ygg

_________________
~*~*~ That which does not kill me only gives me hives. ~*~*~


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Mar 22, 2005 1:01 pm 
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Joined: Wed Feb 02, 2005 7:19 pm
Posts: 207
Location: Halifax
Those are all really great ideas.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Mar 22, 2005 4:35 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 1:56 pm
Posts: 27
Location: Halifax NS
I can't say enough about taking a cooler... no matter where you are going or how long the trip!

We recently flew to Toronto (cooler stacked full) flight went well, until we landed. Got stuck on the plane for 4 EXTRA HOURS due to the labour dispute. I sure was glad to have the cooler, I felt a little guilty not sharing with the plane full of people though!

i


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Apr 27, 2005 12:44 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 1:25 pm
Posts: 323
I am no longer able to travel by plane, trains, etc. so all I have left is my car. Over the past 2 years, I have gotten real good at that. I bought a "car fridge" that I adore! It plugs into the car for the drive then has the adaptor for the hotel (or simply not to have your relatives pick in your things while at their house :wink: ). I also bought an electric kettle that opens up so I can make safe food and also have a single element electric stove-top. I always take extra fresh food and pack a bin of dry and non-refrigerated food. I never eat out or things that people did without my supervision, so I have learned to pack what I like and sometimes try to pack something similar to what the others around the table will eat if I know ahead of time. Also, because of severe reactions to just the smell of fish, most grocery stores are out of reach for me... so I buy everything where I know it's safe: home!

Packing all my food and making it myself has saved my sanity and health. Before doing all of this, I would always get sick or end up eating Cherrios for Christmas dinner! But I can now enjoy traveling again!

Mylène


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Apr 27, 2005 12:59 pm 
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Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 9:38 pm
Posts: 1643
Location: Toronto
Mylène wrote:
Before doing all of this, I would always get sick or end up eating Cherrios for Christmas dinner!


:lol: I can't believe it. We both picked the same cereal. OK - so I never actually had it for Christmas dinner - but, I can remember living on it for a few days. Dry cheerios.

It took me years before I could even stand to LOOK at cheerios again.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Apr 27, 2005 2:08 pm 
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Joined: Mon Apr 11, 2005 9:38 pm
Posts: 924
Location: Oakville, Ontario
Wow, these are fantastic tips! Thanks everyone! This is exactly the reason I joined this forum - so we could all share in our experience. These tips are really going to help out a lot of people!

A few tips we've learned along the way is bring LOTS of food (more than we need) and "safe" foods to share with others if a group of people is together. At a recent overnight stay in a hotel, we made sure the hotel had a fridge, and we brought a "safe" cold supper (more like appetizers), a breakfast and a lunch that we could eat in the room. Our "safe" foods included cereal and milk for breakfast, bread, ham and veggies for lunch, and assorted appetizer-type dinner items (cold pizza, veggies, kolbassa, cheese, crackers, etc.) The kids loved it!

We are planning to take a longer trip this summer, and plan to bring our own toaster oven, toaster oven tray for cooking on, and a couple of our own pans for cooking foods on the stove. Bringing our own portable bbq is something we're considering as well.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri May 06, 2005 12:34 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 1:25 pm
Posts: 323
Bringing LOTS of food is a really great tip that I also had to learn and was glad I did when my grandma was admitted to the hospital while I was on a one day trip over Christmas... safe food is not that easy to come buy when all the stores are closed! Good thing I had a container with noodles and all that I could eat for a couple more days.

AnnaMarie: Cherrios was a life saver for me on so many occasions when I was diagnosed with my milk allergy that I have not eaten some in over 4 years! I could find Cherrios wherever I went, so when people forgot about my allergies after telling me that they wouldn't, I would end up with the box of dry cereals, but after 2 years of eating Cherrios for Christmas, I decided to bring my own food no matter what others tell me! Lessons you learn the hard way!

Mylène


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 Post subject: Post topic
PostPosted: Fri May 06, 2005 2:38 pm 
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Joined: Tue Apr 12, 2005 9:50 am
Posts: 205
Location: Canada
My Husband and I make meals that I can eat and freeze them.
We also make muffins, cookies,bread etc.
we have learned to come with lots as you all have said.
This has been great as we stay in hotels that have microwaves (he always checks it out) we have been able to drive the distance it takes to visit our children.
One other thing we take is a small BBQ from home for the picnic areas, this is nice sometimes and you look like anyone else when you stop in a Park etc.
We also buy lots of vegies and fruit from our local store, we are more comfortabe with them.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri May 27, 2005 4:03 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 1:48 pm
Posts: 26
Location: Canada
When camping make sure your cooler is well sealed because the animals prefer healthy food over junk food too. :lol:

We went camping with friends and a cooler full of gluten, egg and dairy free foods. We decided to put all the food together for the night in one closed vehicle. Closed being the operative word. Someone left it opened. The animal that got into the food supply bypassed all the easy to get at food in front. Cookies, cakes, chips, hot dog buns! They or it (whatever kind of animal it was) went for the foods made with millet, corn flour, quinoa. Thankfully it was mostly extra foods for the just in case there was nothing safe.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2005 1:08 am 
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Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 9:10 pm
Posts: 121
Location: Charlottesville, VA
Around here, food must be placed up bear poles or in coolers inside car trunks at night. Black bears can't rip open car trunks, thankfully. Campgrounds don't permit food to be left out overight--it must be up or in a car trunk.

ygg

_________________
~*~*~ That which does not kill me only gives me hives. ~*~*~


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2005 10:45 pm 
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Joined: Tue Apr 12, 2005 9:50 am
Posts: 205
Location: Canada
You are only talking about one of the animals that like food.
You could have racoons, skunks, porupines, all kinds of wildlife.
Remeber bears if you see a small one the big one will appear!!!!!
I know up here we saw a small bear at the Bank and it was across the road and climbing into the garabage bin from the Chip truck. The police removed it by leaving it in the can and driving away with it. Mind you the gloves that he wore were huge. Now the story may make more sense..........I hope.......
I was told car trunks are the best for campsites also. I do not like camping, I live in the country already.


Last edited by Kelly on Mon May 30, 2005 2:34 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon May 30, 2005 11:50 am 
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Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 9:10 pm
Posts: 121
Location: Charlottesville, VA
Yes, but bearproofing one's food will keep it away from skunks, raccoons, and other critters.

ygg

_________________
~*~*~ That which does not kill me only gives me hives. ~*~*~


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon May 30, 2005 2:27 pm 
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Joined: Tue Apr 12, 2005 9:50 am
Posts: 205
Location: Canada
:D Your right ! I always wanted to tell someone that bear story that lives far away. :D


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