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 Post subject: Travel Insurance
PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2008 3:40 pm 
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Joined: Tue May 24, 2005 7:50 pm
Posts: 2
Location: Calgary
Has anyone ever looked into whether allergic reactions requiring medical treatment are covered by travel insurance, or if they are excluded as a pre-exisiting medical condition?

I have travelled a lot and never given this a second thought--fortunately I've been lucky on my travels and managed to avoid serious reactions.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Apr 22, 2008 6:50 am 
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Joined: Thu Dec 20, 2007 7:23 pm
Posts: 823
Location: Kingston
The correct travel insurance is imperative if you are traveling. We had a family experience where someone suffered an illness while out of country and if the right kind of insurance had not been purchased the hospital bill would have been $30,000 (U.S.) They would not have been able to be treated nor leave the country until the hospital bill was arranged and paid.We had to get the Canadian Consulate involved and we heard many sad stories about people who did not have insurance for pre existing conditions and the financial burdens that
resulted.

When traveling with pre-existing condition you must disclose to the insurance company that there is a preexisting condition and there is an extra charge. (it is not all that more expensive) They have some conditions when you are being insured that must be met so make sure to ask for it.

This is from the Canadian Consulate web site:

Quote:
Supplemental Health Insurance

Do not rely on your provincial health plan to cover costs if you get sick or are injured while abroad. Out-of-country healthcare can be costly, and your health plan will cover only part of the bill at best. It is your responsibility to obtain supplementary travel insurance and understand the terms of your policy.

Some credit card companies offer their holders health and travel insurance. Do not assume that coverage is automatically included or that the card alone provides adequate coverage. Some companies charge an additional premium for travel coverage. Others require that you pay for your travel arrangements using that card. Verify the conditions, limitations, and requirements before departure.

Be sure to ask whether your policy:

* Includes an in-house, worldwide, 24-hour emergency hotline with multilingual operators, as well as physicians or nurses on staff.
* Covers doctor’s visits and prescription medicines.
* Pays for foreign hospitalization and related medical costs.
* Provides up front and direct payment of bills and cash advances abroad, so you don’t have to be out of pocket.
* Covers emergency transportation, such as ambulance services.
* Provides for medical evacuation to Canada or the nearest location with appropriate medical care.
* Pays for a medical escort (doctor or nurse) to accompany you during evacuation.
* Covers pre-existing medical conditions (get an agreement in writing that you are covered).
* Covers premature births and related neonatal care, if needed.
* Pays for the preparation and return of your remains to Canada if you die while abroad.
* Covers emergency dental care.
* Does not exclude any countries or regions you intend to visit.

Carry details of your insurance with you. Also, tell your travel agent, a friend or relative at home, and a travelling companion how to contact your insurer.

Get a detailed invoice from the doctor or hospital before you leave the country. There is nothing more frustrating than trying to get the proper paperwork from thousands of kilometres away. Always remember to submit original receipts for medical services or prescriptions received abroad. Most insurance companies will not accept copies or faxes. Keep a copy of the submitted documents for your files."

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Mary


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Apr 22, 2008 7:24 am 
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Site Admin

Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6481
Location: Ottawa
Yes, you should disclose your allergy.
Your Medic ALert bracelette and the Dr's note indicating you require your auto-injector to be carried on your person at all times including while on the plane would be an indication that you were aware of this pre-existing condition.

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Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Apr 22, 2008 8:45 am 
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Joined: Thu Dec 20, 2007 7:23 pm
Posts: 823
Location: Kingston
We travel extensively internationally and our son has asthma and Anaphylaxis. Prior to traveling we obtain a doctor's note that documents his medical condition. (asthma shoudl be included if it exists) and what he needs to have on his person as far as medications. These are always brought with you on a plane, train, boat. etc.

We also submit this same document to the insurance company so it is fully disclosed. They charge an extra fee to cover the pre existing condition and it is stated on the policy. If it is not stated then you should ask them to reissue it or provide a supporting document so it is listed so there are no misunderstandings.

They do have some restrictions on insuring you if you have been hospitalized for the condition within three months prior to traveling. This time may vary with the insurance company. It is not terribly expensive to get the extra insurance.

Susan advice regarding Medic Alert is also sage advice.

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Mary


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jul 10, 2008 12:09 pm 
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Joined: Thu Jul 10, 2008 11:55 am
Posts: 2
I have idiopathic anaphylaxis and am having a reaction on average once every three months. I am unable to obtain travel insurance to cover anaphylactic reactions. I have talked to at least 20 different companies and they all say that this is a pre-existing medical condition and that there is a reasonable expectation that I will have a reaction while travelling so I am excluded from insurance. Where is everyone getting travel insurance?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Feb 21, 2009 4:16 pm 
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Joined: Sun Nov 30, 2008 11:00 am
Posts: 1119
An insurance through Co-operators group would not cover the pre-existing medical condition so they referred me to another provider who would cover for pre-existing medical conditions - 1.800-268-8099 -did not catch company name and it could be Canadian.

I was given some confusing information because I was told Co-operators would not cover pre-existing but if she does not have a reaction or visit a doctor for her allergies the six months prior then it would be covered :?

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me: allergic to crustaceans plus environmental
teenager: allergic to hazelnuts, some other foods and environmental


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Feb 21, 2009 8:26 pm 
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Site Admin

Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6481
Location: Ottawa
According to Canada 411 reverse look up, that's the Canadian Life & Health Insurance Association. http://www.clhia.ca/index_en_red.htm

_________________
Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Apr 10, 2009 11:51 pm 
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Joined: Sun Nov 30, 2008 11:00 am
Posts: 1119
Thankfully the insurance through my husband's work would cover an allergic reaction. That is one less worry for the trip. It is Standard Life.

_________________
me: allergic to crustaceans plus environmental
teenager: allergic to hazelnuts, some other foods and environmental


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Apr 14, 2009 12:15 am 
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Joined: Sun Aug 17, 2008 12:02 am
Posts: 12
Location: vancouver
In the summer of 2008, my son visited a US hospital for an ana reaction to nuts. As we did not have "extra" medical insurance we thought for sure that we would have to pay. In the end, our MSP covered the doctor's fees and our extended medical through work covered the rest. I guess it depends on your health coverage.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 22, 2009 6:30 pm 
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Joined: Wed Apr 22, 2009 5:58 pm
Posts: 2
Hi Folks, I have had the unpleasant experience 3 times now travelling out of country and experiencing anaphylaxis. I have found good coverage with CIBC travel insurance and CAA insurance. CIBC does not consider "allergies" as a pre-existing condition requiring extra coverage. I always phone and ask about "allergies" when I am purchasing the insurance, and get a written rider saying I've disclosed "allergies".

By way of warning; the hospital in the Algarve, Portugal had terrible triage and did not recognize the necessity of emergency treatment for anaphylaxis.. Once I recieved treatment, it was good but I waited 45 minutes and ended up in the ICU. Additionally, language was definitely a barrier. I will definitely avoid foreign destinations where English is not readily spoken. All the best, Melissa


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Apr 23, 2009 12:30 am 
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Joined: Tue Jun 26, 2007 2:45 pm
Posts: 805
Location: Vancouver, BC
I agree with what was said about CIBC insurance. We got it free as we paid for the flights with our CIBC credit card, and I was told the same information when I phoned them to ask about allergies. They said it was not a pre-existing condition, and would only be considered as such if someone was treated by a doctor for an allergic reaction within 3 months of the trip (I'm pretty sure that's what she said, but I just remember it didn't apply to us). Good idea to get it in writing, though - I'll know for next time.

_________________
DD 2004 Allergy to peanuts, egg, sesame, and new: lentils and chick peas
DS 2006 Allergy to peanuts, tree nuts, milk, egg, kiwi fruit, eczema


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Apr 24, 2009 9:36 pm 
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Joined: Sun Nov 30, 2008 11:00 am
Posts: 1119
Very interesting that two members posted about CIBC insurance as that was the company that I had checked with and was told that it was a pre-existing condition.

We then confirmed through my husband's extended insurance that she would be covered.

_________________
me: allergic to crustaceans plus environmental
teenager: allergic to hazelnuts, some other foods and environmental


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Apr 26, 2009 2:00 am 
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Joined: Tue Jun 26, 2007 2:45 pm
Posts: 805
Location: Vancouver, BC
Hmmm, CIBC is not the one actually providing the insurance, though, there is an underwriter whose name I can't recall. CIBC just pays for it, I guess, and in our case, provides it as a service to certain credit card holders. I'll check the name and post when I find it.

_________________
DD 2004 Allergy to peanuts, egg, sesame, and new: lentils and chick peas
DS 2006 Allergy to peanuts, tree nuts, milk, egg, kiwi fruit, eczema


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Apr 26, 2009 9:27 am 
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Joined: Sun Nov 30, 2008 11:00 am
Posts: 1119
[quote="walooet"]An insurance through Co-operators group would not cover the pre-existing medical conditionquote]

I think this comment from me in February referred to the CIBC insurance. I had called CIBC asking about the insurance coverage on our CIBC Gold Visa.

_________________
me: allergic to crustaceans plus environmental
teenager: allergic to hazelnuts, some other foods and environmental


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Apr 26, 2009 10:42 am 
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Joined: Wed Apr 22, 2009 5:58 pm
Posts: 2
Interesting discussion. My initial comments about CIBC insurance providing me with coverage for 2 out-of-country episodes of anaphylaxis, referred to medical insurance I specifically purchased for our trip, not the type available through my CIBC gold card. So I wonder if that makes a difference? My year-long out-of-country insurance has now expired and I was going to rely on just the medical insurance provided by the credit card but I will thoroughly investigate based on others' experiences.


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