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PostPosted: Fri Jan 19, 2007 1:10 pm 
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Joined: Sat Oct 22, 2005 8:49 pm
Posts: 28
Hi there

You could always email them and ask them what there procedures are if you have a re-action in the air. I would suggest carring extra epi pens. How many do you generally take ?

Julie


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jan 19, 2007 3:26 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jan 15, 2007 2:43 pm
Posts: 5
Location: ontario
I will fire off an email to them, and then post their reply!


I usually take two epi pens, a bottle of benedryl, and a pack of benedryl tablets.

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Allergic to Tree Nuts, Peanuts, Coconut, Septra, Ceclor, Erythromycin and waiting to be officially diagnosed with a milk allergy


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Feb 01, 2007 11:41 am 
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Joined: Thu Nov 10, 2005 10:02 am
Posts: 116
Location: Gatineau
I'm not sure if there's a separate thread for West Jet, but we've had some less than stellar experiences with them as well - I fly regularly from Ontario out west. My Mom is one of those fiercely maternal Moms (bless her) and is also a freelance journalist. She has written to the papers (that she regularly contributes to, not minor papers) about her exchange with West Jet with no success to date - interestingly West Jet advertises in these newspapers.

I'm the one with the allergies, and to make a long story short, West Jet sells cashews, and hands out pretzels that may contain everything under the sun (in particular nuts). I was politely told that they would not stop serving cashews or pretzels for one person when there might be one hundred on the flight that would like those snacks. Interestingly, I was told on another flight not to worry because the cashews weren't big sellers anyway. Nice touch.

My favourite response was when it was suggested to me that those with allergies should consider driving to their destination.

My Mom and I have gotten the runaround from West Jet just like other airlines. Somehow I think if I was a child it might be different, too bad. I always have to laugh at the commercial "Why do Westjetters care so much?" I would argue they really don't when it comes to someone's life, but if you've forgotten your cell phone you're in luck!!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Feb 02, 2007 12:26 am 
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Joined: Sun Mar 05, 2006 1:05 pm
Posts: 528
Location: Burlington, Ontario
And that's why next month, when we go to Florida, we are flying United instead of supporting a Canadian airline.

What is Air Canada's new slogan? "Flying the way you want" or something? Not very likely for the peanut/nut allergics.

Let's keep supporting the airlines which are willing to accommodate us, it's as simple as that.

_________________
15 year old - asthmatic, allergic to cats, dogs, horses, waiting to be "officially" diagnosed for anaphylaxis
12 year old - asthmatic, allergic to tree pollen and mold, OAS
Husband - Allergic to amoxycillin
Self - Allergic to housework only


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Feb 02, 2007 8:04 am 
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Site Admin

Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6475
Location: Ottawa
Just breifly scanned this document which I find quite interesting (although it dates back to 2004)
ICAO is the International Civial Aviation Authority and is a standard that guides the Transportation Board of Canada
http://www.icao.int/icao/en/assembl/a35/wp/wp122_en.pdf
I found to be most of interest was the 18th page of this 34 page document.
It is titled Provisions of Services and speaks of the role of all aviation partners in the chain of health care. It discusses the best practices in medical emergency services the first I would expect should be to avoid an emergency and I thinkc that this should include discontinuing the sale/exchange of highly transferable allergens such as nuts and peanuts.
I will read more on this when I have time.

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Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Feb 10, 2007 8:52 pm 
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Joined: Fri Sep 15, 2006 2:02 pm
Posts: 44
I've been helping my daughter (20 years old - anaphylaxis/asthma peanuts, nuts, fish, shellfish) to plan a study exchange to Germany. The more we plan this, and the more I have contact with Air Canada, the more fear I have. She reacts, although mildly, to inhaled fish fumes. Of course, she has always removed herself immediately from any fish cooking area that she enters by mistake.

Initially, I was told by Air Canada, that fish is served, but rarely, on flights from Canada to Europe and I am hoping to receive a response from Air Canada respecting their ability to ensure that no fish dinners are served on the flights she is on. The nuts/peanuts are a worry, but I think they may be easier to avoid than the fish fumes. Has anybody heard anything about the efficiency of hepa or charcoal face masks for avoidance of airborne food allergies, peanut/nut dust, fish, etc.?

I really don't want her to travel overseas - it is such a risk - I am sick over this day and night and the doctors don't seem to have the concern that I do. I have not discussed the depth of my fear with her. 20 is a funny age - not a child, but not independent enough to be fully responsible for her choices - We have known that her allergies are serious since she was two, and have always tried to make her not feel disabled. I am so afraid but am not in a position to forbid her to go .........

So glad you are all out there ........ thank you.

Shirley

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Mum of 19 year old daughter - asthma and life threatening allergies to nuts, peanuts and seafood


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Feb 11, 2007 8:23 pm 
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Joined: Thu Aug 11, 2005 6:48 pm
Posts: 614
Location: Ontario, Canada / Cambridge, UK
Shirley,

I fly frequently to the UK with Air Canada and from experience, I find the early morning flights are the best. The first meal is breakfast... so there is a choice of waffles or omelettes. The afternoon meal is usually a sandwich (cold cuts) and I believe there is no tuna or salmon as an option. I also find that the early morning flight does not serve the dreaded bag of smoked almonds with the afternoon meal. Of course, there is no guarantee but these are some of my personal observations.

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16-year-old son: peanuts, nuts, raw egg whites, asthmatic
Self: allergic rhinitis, fragrance/chemical sensitivities, oral allergy syndrome


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 Post subject: flying to Europe/UK
PostPosted: Sun Feb 11, 2007 9:45 pm 
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Joined: Fri Sep 15, 2006 2:02 pm
Posts: 44
Thanks, Storm: We are on the West Coast, so the flight would be longer. Have booked Victoria - Calgary - Frankfurt and an evening meal is served. I will rethink this. Maybe better to take a flight to Ontario or Quebec that doesn't serve dinner, stay overnight and take a morning flight from there.

I'll look into that. Jane is planning to go to Edinburgh in September, as well.

Shirley

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Mum of 19 year old daughter - asthma and life threatening allergies to nuts, peanuts and seafood


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Feb 12, 2007 9:51 am 
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Joined: Sat Apr 16, 2005 12:09 am
Posts: 1054
shirley wrote:
Has anybody heard anything about the efficiency of hepa or charcoal face masks for avoidance of airborne food allergies, peanut/nut dust, fish, etc.?

Good question...maybe a question for "ask the allergists"?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Feb 16, 2007 5:39 pm 
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Joined: Thu Nov 10, 2005 10:02 am
Posts: 116
Location: Gatineau
Hi Shirley,

I'm ana to nuts, eggs, shellfish and bananas and I did a 4 month exchange in England, and travelled to France, Italy, Portugal, Ireland, Scotland, Wales and the Netherlands during that time - I was scared, too, but you get used to what is safe around you, what brands are good, etc. Will your daughter be able to make her own food? That was very helpful (well, crucial) for me, having a kitchen where I lived. Obviously, it's pretty risky going out to eat, and for trying to figure out non-English ingredient labels. I sort of didn't think of that when I travelled to Amsterdam and then went "right - no English." Let's just say I ate a lot of McDonald's that week, something I haven't done in years but at the time was a Godsend. I also found lots of Pizza Huts, KFCs, Subways, etc. - companies you wouldn't necessarily think are global but are. These might prove very helpful for your daughter.

If you have any questions I'd be happy to answer them - and when you feel so worried, remember that this will be a life changing trip for her, an amazing experience that is priceless and unforgettable.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Feb 18, 2007 10:04 pm 
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Joined: Fri Sep 15, 2006 2:02 pm
Posts: 44
Hi, lin101 - thanks for the post. - I sent you a private email.

Ethansmom - I asked our GP about the masks, and said he thought that was a good idea - he offered to give me two of the masks they use in the office to protect themselves from viruses, i.e. avian flu, SARS, etc. - they are sealed around the edges and according to my doctor, protein particles are not as small as viruses. He told me he sees people wearing masks on planes quite frequently now. Most probably to protect themselves against disease. However, we are going to speak to our allergist about this, as well.

S.

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Mum of 19 year old daughter - asthma and life threatening allergies to nuts, peanuts and seafood


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Feb 19, 2007 10:46 am 
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Joined: Fri Sep 15, 2006 2:02 pm
Posts: 44
Just generally, I want to vent about the attitude of airlines in general, especially Air Canada, in response to the many earlier on this forum.

I have spoken with customer service twice, and they are extremely insensitive regarding allergies. Almost irritated that I would even suggest that they might have "peanut free buffer zones", or alert us ahead of time if the caterer was serving seafood. I asked what would be the action taken if someone sitting beside an allergic person decided to chomp away on a jar of peanuts - answer "nothing" - "Don't you have your epi-pen?" Oh, yeah - just carry on eating your nuts, etc. and I will inject myself over and over. Why are so many other disabilities accomodated and the airlines act like you are trying to be SPECIAL and I'M SO SENSITIVE you have to cater to me - One representative said "we're not going to change what we do just for one person" in an extremely irritated voice. Then she said, why don't you fly with another carrier?

Oh, boy - just venting. Actually, I think their attitude just reflects alot of people's attitudes in the general population towards allergies - they don't understand. We have to get out there and educate them!!

Just venting ..........whew......... off to work, now.

S.

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Mum of 19 year old daughter - asthma and life threatening allergies to nuts, peanuts and seafood


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Feb 19, 2007 2:34 pm 
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Joined: Thu Aug 24, 2006 1:42 am
Posts: 222
Location: Victoria, British Columbia
Oh yeah, I hear you. I was once told that attendants wouldn't administer an EpiPen to a person who needed it because they don't handle needles. I then spoke to a former attendant who said that their union wouldn't let them 'guarantee' they would do it, but most people wouldn't sit and just watch someone suffer. Good to hear, isn't it. :roll:

I agree that we need better education for the general population. We need to get the focus on the health condition and away from 'blaming' the person with the allergy. Sheesh.

Caroline

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son anaphylactic to peanuts


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Feb 19, 2007 3:47 pm 
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Joined: Sat Apr 16, 2005 12:09 am
Posts: 1054
Does anyone know what would happen or who is responsible if some kind of medical emergency (allergy related or not) were to take place during a flight?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Feb 20, 2007 5:04 am 
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Joined: Wed Dec 06, 2006 12:47 am
Posts: 58
I believe the flight attendants are in charge, but the pilot has the ultimate authority in the air. They are trained in a few procedures such as using an AED (automatic external defibrillator), using oxygen, and a few other basic procedures. Many people are not authorized to give epi-pens in many situations, it's not just flight attendants. With the amount of lawsuits these days, it's no wonder that people are reluctant to. When I worked for the parks department in the parks doing horticulture stuff we were not even allowed to give a diabetic an insulin shot they prepared or administer an epi-pen. We could position it, but they had to administer the medication themselves. In fact, we could not even put a band-aid on someone, we could give it to them, but they had to do it themselves. If someone even asked for an asprin, we couldn't give it to them.

With Good Samaritan laws in place, a person can not exceed what their given level of training is. If I were the average Joe with no training, I could reasonably apply pressure to a bleeding wound, but no more. If I had EMT training, I could do more, but not perform say, a tracheotomy (because I wouldn't have been trained in that). If a person goes above and beyond their level of training, they can be sued if they screw up a procedure or cause more harm to the victim.

Not trying to say that Flight Attendants shouldn't be able to administer an epi-pen or a whole host of other people including lifeguards, et al. But after studying Good Samaritan laws in school, the level of training required would be more than most employers would be willing to provide.

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Me- Allergic to Eggs and Dairy

Looking forward to ankle surgery. That's sad when that's what you have to look forward too.....


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