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PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2006 2:40 am 
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Joined: Sat Apr 22, 2006 10:22 am
Posts: 24
Location: Vancouver Island
My 11 month old son (just started walking this week!) started as many on this site with eczema at 3 months and allergies are a big trigger for him.

I've been breastfeeding on a restricted diet since he was diagnosed with eczema and for the last few months on a "few foods diet". The whole point was to help Kai get to a stable place with his skin ,and have it heal so that we could start introducing foods and know if he was reacting. I really didn't want to stop breastfeeding, so this was part of our negotiation with the Allergist. Kai has been doing well and now I'm desperately trying to introduce foods to him without much success.

RAST showed very high numbers for most things tested: dog, dust mites, nuts, milk egg, peanut, soy, wheat, (exposure for all these through breastmilk), and potato. He had moderate levels for Rice (0.77) and hasn't been tested yet for pear or yam. Barley was quite a severe reaction that hasn't been tested yet either (hives, swollen face, reduced consciousness).

He is only eating broccoli at the moment and I've just started giving him Neocate (he doesn't tolerate any other formula). I'm having a more difficult times staying on the diet as I feel I shouldn't be eating foods that Kai is allergic to and potato had been a huge part of my diet, so I'm starting to wean him.

Rice, yam, pear and carrot have a similar effect on him. It takes a while to show up (a few days) and he has to be eating a enough volume (some for breakfast, lunch and dinner). He ends up getting diarrhea with eczema on his bum and scrotum and VERY itchy bits (bath is not fun). A dietician has mentioned that he may have carbohydrate intolerance with regards to rice and yam reaction (hadn't tried other foods at that point). The allergist doesn't feel that it is necessarily allergy as there could be other factors resulting in those symptoms and we need to test it to confirm. I'm waiting to have a number of foods to test as last time we went in for a blood test we just had one item.....there seem to be lots of allergies, so I'd rather reduce the number of times we draw blood.

Does anybody know anything about carbohydrate intolerance? Does anyone have any food suggestions to trywith Kai? I'm going to try lamb next and was thinking of arrowroot after that. I'm emotionally really needing to have another food work out for him. I'm thrilled that he can eat broccoli, but it has been a few months now without having luck with anything else.

trying to stay positive, but ending up feeling more desperate and depressed these days....then there are the denial days....food fantasies....


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2006 12:59 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
Hi k-rae -

I'm sorry you're having such a very tough time. It is so frustrating when you can't quite figure out what the cause is, not to mention having to deal with the symptoms and frustrations of introducing foods only to have them cause severe problems.

I don't know any thing about carbohydrate intolerance, but I did a quick google and the sites I saw don't seem mention anything about eczema. Perhaps it's a combination of the two - CI and allergies - for your son...

Maybe see if Google will help you find some info - I find it's often the best place to start. And PM me for another possible resource if you don't get any other responses here.

I really don't know what to suggest for foods. I guess you need to research carbohydrates and figure out what is low/no-carb. I think a lot of foods have carbs in them from the little I've read...

I would think your best bet is to consult with the dietitian. Has s/he been able to make any suggestions about what to try that is low/no carbs??

Also... I hope you're doing okay mentally with the weaning. I am a huge breastfeeding fan, and nursed my youngest until he was almost 3 (avoiding wheat, barley, eggs, milk, peanuts and nuts), but I strongly believe that it's important for the mom to be healthy too, and such a restricted diet likely isn't good for your own health (physical or mental). If I'd had to cut out potatoes and rice and more, I likely would have reconsidered how long I nursed.

Obviously you're a very caring mom who is doing all she can to try to help her little boy, and that's the main thing. :)

I hope you get some answers, and wish I were more help!

K.

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


Last edited by KarenOASG on Tue Jul 18, 2006 9:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2006 1:54 pm 
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Joined: Sat Apr 22, 2006 10:22 am
Posts: 24
Location: Vancouver Island
Thanks for the tips Karen. I've done a bit of googling now and think that I need to have a confirmation on if there is something else going on for Kai, like carbohydrate intolerance. Perhaps a trip to the pediatrician. I've started feeling like Kai's situation is getting quite complicated for the doctors that we see that no one really knows what to do to get a handle on the big picture. Sometimes it takes alot of energy to be always grabbing to bull by the horns, researching, asking, trying to get somewhere.

I will also talk to the dietician to see if she has any suggestions of low carb food (Yikes I sound like my mom the Atkins follower!!).

And thanks for understanding that giving up breastfeeding is so difficult. I nursed my older son until almost 2.5 (was getting complicated tandem nursing) and I've fought hard to continue breastfeeding my youngest. My diet consists of about 15 food items and losing staples....like potato has been harder than I would have thought. There are so many layers to the emotions, I've been working hard at trying to acknowledge them all. Not to mention that Neocate is rediculously expensive! One day at a time...


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2006 10:04 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
Quote:
I've started feeling like Kai's situation is getting quite complicated for the doctors that we see that no one really knows what to do to get a handle on the big picture.


I think that is the hardest thing with some of our kiddoes (and even the adults) - the situation is so complicated and there is no one medical specialist that you can go to to say "put all these pieces together and tell me what is wrong!!"

I remember saying that to someone when we were having problems with one of my guys (the oldest I think), and they looked at me and said, "Well, that would be you." Not in an unkind way - but as if they knew how hard it was and realized what a tough job it would be to do that.

I knew I'd be with our current allergist for a long time when she said, of my two kids and their combined situation, "Wow, you must be pretty overwhelmed. This is pretty overwhelming." Just to have that acknowledged -- and for her to use that word -- was amazing.

K.

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 19, 2006 2:38 am 
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Joined: Fri Jan 06, 2006 8:22 pm
Posts: 154
Location: Georgia
k-rae
So sorry you are having to deal with this. :(

I have no advice on the breastfeeding. My daughter weaned herself. Just dropped a feeding a month until she finally gave up the bedtime feeding at 11 months. My allergist wanted me to breastfeed her for at least 6 months before introducing any foods. (I have several food allergies; fortunately, she has none.)

But as a child my Mom said I got "colicky" at about 4 months when she stopped breastfeeding and introduced foods. Well, duh! :roll: Had all the classic symptoms...ring around the bottom, diarrhea, irritability...later on I had nausea/vomiting/stomachaches...then as a teen, nausea and diarrhea into my 30's. My reactions are now anaphylactic to some of my allergens.

The good news is that most of the foods you will have to avoid for your son can probably be re-introduced in a few years. That's why the Docs suggest you introduce a new food for a week or two, then pull it back out of the rotation if a problem arises.

When I was first diagnosed in my early 30's, I had to avoid eggs, beef, chicken, pork, fish/shellfish and several grains and fruits. I asked my Allergist, "What on earth can I eat?" He replied, "Have you ever had lamb?" I said, "Well, I did marry a Greek! " :lol: Something to be said for serendipity!

Try to get grass-fed lamb. It tastes better, and won't cause possible grain reactions. Of course we love the lamb chops, but who can afford them? The arm steaks (with a round bone) do great on the grill. We just use salt and a little pepper. These are our staple cut of meat. You can make stir-fry from this cut also (yummy with broccoli). Much less expensive than the chops.

The leg of lamb makes a good roast that will serve a small family for a week, or you can freeze some for later. I season it with salt, pepper, lemon juice and olive oil. You can use garlic, but it may be a little strong for an infant. Cut it all off with an electric knife, then throw the bone back in a pot for broth. It will keep in the freezer for several months.

The ground lamb can be made into just about anything you would use as ground beef, but be sure to tell your butcher it can't be adulterated. You don't want it ground on the same grinder as beef or pork.

The good news... after 5 years on an elimination diet, I now tolerate some beef. Never have been able to do chicken; tummyaches almost immediately. But the little cornish game hens do not bother me for some strange reason. :? And we eat lots of turkey, too.

Remember, his diet may sound really restrictive to you, but he is not used to all of the things we miss. Now is the ideal time for you to find this out; you have complete control of his diet. And many of these foods won't be forever.

Take care,
Daisy


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