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 Post subject: New to allergies
PostPosted: Sun Apr 01, 2007 12:47 am 
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Joined: Sat Mar 31, 2007 11:36 pm
Posts: 2
My six year old son was recently diagnosed with a peanut allergy and a mild sensitivity to tree nuts ( as well as 16 enviromental allgeries dogs,cats,trees,ragweed etc.) He has never had an anaphylaxis reaction to peanuts but did experience an itcy tongue after one bite of a peanut butter sandwich last year.
We were sent to see the allergenist not for the itchy tounge but because of his eczema. We were shocked at the amount of allergies he has. My husband and I always figured he may of had a sensitivity to peanuts (because of his itchy tongue, and the fact that he has never liked peanut butter) but not to the extent of what the doctor said. He now has epipens, benadryl and a medical alert bracelet. We were told to make sure that we advoid all peanuts, read labels, and ask at restaurants about the use of peanut oil.
Since we are new to this we dont know much about it. We left the doctors office overwhelmed. At home, that is when all of our questions hit (I didn't ask them at the doctors because I was overwhelmed and shocked). Since he has never experienced anaphlyxis should I take away the things he has ate since he has been able to eat people food (like Tim Horton donuts)? What about foods that say "have been processed in facility that also processes peanuts"? What about " may contain traces of"? If anyone has some suggestions or answers it would be appreciated.

Thank you,

Tiffanie


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Apr 01, 2007 7:09 am 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6455
Location: Ottawa
Welcome to this board. Many of your questions so typical of a parent of a newly diagnosised child. They have been asked and answered here. Use the search engine at the top to review some threads and feel free to make new ones. Talking and sharing is a great way to externalize the stress and deal with it. Knowledge is power!
What you are describing sounds like the shock and realization that this is truly a life threatening allergy and the responsibility is huge. It is a difficult fact to face and people come to it a different times. Be kind to yourself and get ots of sleep. Talk to your husband about the information you both are discovering and come up with strategies you can bith agree to. There is nothing worse than having one parent feeling that the other is not doing enough to protect their child. The last thing you need is more stress.
It is helpful to go through the cupboards and read every label on every ingredient in your kitchen (yes, everything). It is good practice and once you have removed all allergens you will get a sense of your home at the very least being a safe haven.
It does get better.
We were "fortunate" in that our daughter was diagnosed at 10 months so she really doesn't know any other way of life. How does your son feel about this sudden diagnosis? Coming to terms with your own mortality is something very hard for most adults let alone a child. I have described EpiPens in terms of firehydrants. You probably will never need to use one because you try to stay safe but if you need one you want it to be close at hand. It is also helpful to link up with a support group that meets once in a while so that he can see there are other children dealing with the same issues.

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Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Apr 01, 2007 8:17 am 
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Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2005 8:55 pm
Posts: 412
Location: Vancouver, BC
I love your analogy of an Epipen being like a fire hydrant, Susan. Good luck, Tiffanie. It will be a steep learning curve, and the next little while will probably be challenging as you come to terms with all this. It is a manageable disease, however, and we will all help you and your family as much as we can.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Apr 01, 2007 3:01 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 6:53 pm
Posts: 1454
Location: Canada
Hi Tiffanie, and welcome :) I'd definitely say it is a good idea to avoid anything that could possibly have come in contact with nuts. I'm pretty sure that Tim Horton's donuts fall under this description. Unless the bakery is really careful about keeping everything separate and using separate tongs, etc. . . it is a good idea to avoid baked goods.

"may contains" are out . .. . although if it says "processed in a facility that contains peanuts" you might want to call the company for clarification. If there is a substantial risk of cross contamination (and it is sometimes difficult to determine that from where we are) I avoid. Hope this helps!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Apr 02, 2007 11:55 pm 
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Joined: Sat Mar 31, 2007 11:36 pm
Posts: 2
Thank you for your support and information. Its good to find a group of people that have children with allergies or have allgeries themselves. I have not had much time to read alot of other posts, but did read some. When we were first told about his allergies we felt so overwhelmed and kind of alone, I am glade that I found this site.


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