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 Post subject: Putting weight on?
PostPosted: Mon Jul 05, 2010 10:56 pm 
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Joined: Fri Oct 02, 2009 8:06 pm
Posts: 217
Location: Terrebonne, Quebec
My 19.5 month old daughter just officially dropped below the 5th percentile for weight.. she's healthy, but a tiny little thing, the moms at the park go on and on about how her legs are so thin compared to their babies and her tummy doesn't stick out at all.. How can I put weight on her.. any ideas? She eats really whenever she wants, she gets a very balanced diet (as balanced as it can be), but I worry a bit about it. Her doctor didn't seem incredibly concerned last time, but not very pleased about her weight either, and I want to make sure she has enough to grow strong. I'm cursed with a kid that doens't like fatty foods either, if it's fried, she refuses it, only grilled low fat foods or fruits and vegetables..

To put in in perspective a bit, at her 12 month checkup she weighed 22.6 pounds.. Now (19.5 months) she weighs 23 fully clothed, which is pretty much no gain.. Did anybody else go through this?

_________________
Daughter 3.5 years) - Dairy, Eggs, Peanuts, Sesame, Beef; asthma and eczema
Daughter (2 years) - Peanuts Eczema
Son (7 months) - Contact allergy to something food undetermined


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 Post subject: Re: Putting weight on?
PostPosted: Mon Jul 05, 2010 11:32 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jun 26, 2007 2:45 pm
Posts: 803
Location: Vancouver, BC
My DD was allergic to milk and egg, but hadn't been diagnosed with the peanut allergy yet when she was that age. She was about 50th percentile until about 6 months, then not far below that at 12 months, probably 20 pounds, but gained almost nothing between 12 and 18 months. The GP sent us to a ped because she was concerned. Because she couldn't have dairy and I had weaned her at 12 months, and I didn't like the ingredients I read in the soy formula, I was giving her organic soy milk, which has less fat than regular milk.

The ped did a bunch of tests and found nothing wrong with her. Also, we saw a dietician who looked at a food journal and said she ate way more than most kids who came through her office. FWIW, I am 4'11 and DH is 5'6 1/2 . . . .

The ped told me that a child's ht/wt from birth to 6 months is more to do with maternal health, and then at 6 months genetics will start to kick in. Both my kids gained a lot in the early months due to being good breastfeeders, then dropped off at about 1 yr. DD is now 5.5 and below 0 percentile, but still there is nothing medically wrong with her. DS is almost 4 and probably at 1%. Both are active, healthy, developmentally normal.

If you're concerned, you can get referred to a ped to get some tests done to ensure there isn't an underlyinig cause for the lack of weight gain. There are also healthy fats, like avocado, etc you could probably give her (maybe hidden in a fruit smoothie?) Or maybe fatty fish like salmon? Not sure. . . . I was trying to fatten up my kids too, and they really just eat what they want to eat. Good luck!

_________________
DD 2004 Allergy to peanuts, egg, sesame, and new: lentils and chick peas
DS 2006 Allergy to peanuts, tree nuts, milk, egg, kiwi fruit, eczema


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 Post subject: Re: Putting weight on?
PostPosted: Tue Jul 06, 2010 7:04 am 
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Joined: Fri Oct 10, 2008 9:40 pm
Posts: 2034
Location: ottawa
Hi Cauger, We went through the exact same thing with almost identical weight numbers at the identical months old. At 24 months he was only 21 lbs. I was FREAKING OUT. This took him down to the 4th percentile and that number was grilled into my brain. There was only a 1/2 lb weight gain in almost a year making me frantic. He (at that time) was allergic to eggs and fish so I couldn't get any protein into him that way. With is allergies to legumes and nuts that eliminated pretty much every other source of protein other than dairy. He was reacting to meat also at that time so I was feeling very optionless. Basically he ate yogurt and carrots and rice crispies and milk. My life seems to be evolving around trying to get him to eat and then crying because he wouldn't. I wanted him to eat this healthy well balanced diet.
It was my family dr. who was worrried but not freaking out like me who suggested just relaxing my expectations and letting him eat anything he wanted for a while. If he could and would eat chips, let him, if he wanted ice cream, let him. Almost to increase his appetite. And it worked!!! For a while I let him nibble away on little things, mostly crap, just to get fat into him. All of a sudden he got hungry and was eating a piece of toast or a few bits of noodles.
Now at 33 months he eats more and doesn't look like a rail anymore. I added a tsp. of skim milk powder to his yogurt (really high in protein), I added a tsp. of wheat germ to anything I could possible make (cookies, muffins etc) that he'd have a few bites of. You can buy toddler powdered formula which is vitamin enriched and see if she will either drink it plain or add the dry powder again to something she might eat or drink.
I know how emotional it is trying to get your kid to eat. If he had any memory from that age (thank goodness they don't) all he would see is me following him around with food for months on end. :wink:

:huggy Good luck HUGS

_________________
DD 12 yrs -no allergies
4 yr old DS - asthma/eczema Anaphylactic to Peanuts, all tree nuts, sesame , all pea/lentil legumes, gelatin.
Allergic to trees, grass,ragweed, feathers, dander, mold and dust.
Outgrew eggs, fish, shellfish


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 Post subject: Re: Putting weight on?
PostPosted: Tue Jul 06, 2010 9:47 am 
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Joined: Fri Oct 02, 2009 8:06 pm
Posts: 217
Location: Terrebonne, Quebec
It's nice to know i'm not alone.. She gets frequent snacks during the day of teddy grahams and animal crackers, she likes those and she'll eat her meals, she loves meat which is great, i'm not worried about protein at all really, it's just the pesky fat I can't seem to get into her. We are all pretty tall in the family (i'm 5'8, so is the hubby - I guess that's shorter for a man). I guess I should just relax and keep doing what i'm doing. Rice crispy squares are a great idea, I love them too, which is the problem, because I'm trying to drop about 30 pounds and I simply don't have the willpower to not eat them once they are in the house (guess i'll have to learn). Her appointment is in november, so i guess I will just wait until then unless I see other things wrong.

_________________
Daughter 3.5 years) - Dairy, Eggs, Peanuts, Sesame, Beef; asthma and eczema
Daughter (2 years) - Peanuts Eczema
Son (7 months) - Contact allergy to something food undetermined


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 Post subject: Re: Putting weight on?
PostPosted: Tue Jul 06, 2010 12:25 pm 
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Joined: Fri Oct 10, 2008 9:40 pm
Posts: 2034
Location: ottawa
Oh how I wish I meant rice crispie squares (gelatin!!), we just have boring old rice crispie cereal with milk in our house. :(

I'm glad you feel a bit better now, I swear the day you find out you are pregnant the worry button turns on. If it isn't one thing it's another. Thank goodness for chocolate (peanut/tree nut/gelatin/shellfish, pea, sesame free of course :rofl )

_________________
DD 12 yrs -no allergies
4 yr old DS - asthma/eczema Anaphylactic to Peanuts, all tree nuts, sesame , all pea/lentil legumes, gelatin.
Allergic to trees, grass,ragweed, feathers, dander, mold and dust.
Outgrew eggs, fish, shellfish


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 Post subject: Re: Putting weight on?
PostPosted: Tue Jul 06, 2010 8:52 pm 
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Site Admin

Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6490
Location: Ottawa
When our daghter was 15 months old she was in the 95percentile both height and weight. Then she was diagnosed as allergic to milk and eggs. OUr pediatrician suggested soy milk and inthe next 6 months she did not grow at all. I asked to see a pediatric dietician at the local childrens' hospital and it was determined that she was deficient of oil by 7 teaspoons per day :frightened . Soy milk is equal to 2% milk when it comes to fat content. Children under 2 years of age need the full fat of homogenized milk.
Quote:
Dietary fat restriction during the first 2 years is not recommended because it may compromise the intake of energy and essential fatty acids and adversely affect growth and development.

http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/pubs/infan ... _9-eng.php

I contacted the Dietitians of Canada a while back (2008) and asked this question. This is the response I received
Quote:
...the following information is taken from Practice-based Evidence in Nutrition [PEN], DC’s online decision support service for dietitians www.dieteticsatwork.com/pen - I’ve provided the evidence and references behind each of the key practice points. Hopefully this will give you a more complete answer.

Q : What are the indications for the use of soy formula for healthy term infants?
Key Practice Point : Several studies suggest that infants grow and develop appropriately and are adequately nourished using soy-based formulas. However, indications for feeding soy formulas to healthy term infants are limited. These indications include infants who cannot take dairy-based products for health, cultural or religious reasons, such as vegan lifestyle, or infants who have galactosemia. (A Level Evidence)

Evidence
a. The Canadian Pediatric Society, Dietitians of Canada, and Health Canada recommend the "use of soy-based formulas only for those infants who cannot take dairy-based products for health, cultural or religious reasons, such as vegan lifestyle or galactosemia" (1).

b. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends the use of soy formula for infants with galactosemia or hereditary lactase deficiency, vegetarian diets, or for infants with documented IgE-mediated allergy to cow milk protein (2).

c. The Paediatric Group of the British Dietetic Association recommends that soy formula be only fed to infants when clinically indicated such as vegan diet, galactosemia or infants with cow's milk allergy / intolerance who refuse extensively hydrolyzed or elemental formulas (3).

d. A number of studies have documented normal growth and development in healthy term infants fed soy formulas. Bone mineralization has also been shown to be equivalent to that seen in term infants fed cow milk formulas (2,4,5). One study found that infants fed soy formula initially grew more slowly and had slower bone mineralization, but that differences had disappeared by 14 weeks and 26 weeks, respectively (6).

e. In a study to review long-term growth of infants fed soy-based formulas, there were no differences in weight, length or head circumference in infants fed soy formulas with or without added nucleotides, compared to infants fed human milk with supplemental cow milk-based formula during the first year of life (7).

f. One study reviewed adult height and usual weight in adults who had been fed soy formula versus cow milk formula in infancy. No significant differences in adult height, usual weight, or usual body mass index in either men or women were found (8).

g. Carbohydrate sources added to soy formulas are lactose-free, including corn starch, corn starch hydrolysate, tapioca starch and sucrose, and are considered appropriate for treatment of galactosemia. Only powder formula should be used for this population, because liquid preparations contain carrageenan, which is approximately 27 per cent galactose (9).
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Comments: The vitamin D added to soy formulas is from an animal source. This information is important to share with vegan families.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
References
1. Canadian Paediatric Society, Dietitians of Canada , and Health Canada . Nutrition for Healthy Term Infants. Ottawa : Minister of Public Works and Government Services, 2005. Available from : http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/pubs/infan ... m-eng.php; accessed 5 February 2006.

2. American Academy of Pediatrics : Committee on Nutrition. Soy protein-based formulas : Recommendations for use in infant feeding. Pediatrics 2005;101(1) : 148-153. Available from : http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/c ... 101/1/148; accessed 8 Dec 2005.

3. Paediatric Group Position Statement on the use of Soy Protein for Infants. February 2004. Available from : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14528647; accessed 8 Dec 2005.

4. Merritt RJ, Jenks BH. Safety of soy-based infant formulas containing isoflavones : The clinical evidence. J Nutr 2004; 134(5) : 1220S-1224S. Available from : http://jn.nutrition.org/cgi/reprint/134/5/1220S; accessed 8 Dec 2005.

5. Mendez MA, Anthony MS, Arab L. Soy-based formulae and infant growth and development : A review. J Nutr 2002(8); 132 : 2127-2130. Available from : http://jn.nutrition.org/cgi/reprint/132/8/2127; accessed 8 Dec 2005.

6. Kohler L, Meeuwisse G, Mortensson W. Food intake and growth of infants between six and twenty-six weeks of age on breast milk, cow's milk formula, or soy formula. Acta Paediatr Scand 1984; 73 : 40-48. Abstract available from : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6702448; accessed 14 Apr 2007.

7. Lasekan JB, Ostrom KM, Jacobs JR, Blatter MM. Growth of newborn, term infants fed soy formulas for 1 year. Clin Pediatr 1999; 38 : 563-571. Abstract available from : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/pubmed/10544862; accessed 8 Dec 2005.

8. Strom BL, Schinnar R, Ziegler E et al. Exposure to soy-based formula in infancy and endocrinological and reproductive outcomes in young adulthood. JAMA 2001; 286(7) : 807-814. Available from : http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/full/286/7/807; accessed 8 Dec 2005.

9. Acosta PB, Yannicelli S. The Ross Metabolic Formula System. Nutrition Support Protocols, Fourth Edition. 2001, Abbott Laboratories. Page 265.

Key Practice Point: Soy-based formulas are not recommended for the following conditions :

· Acute gastroenteritis, unless lactose intolerance has been documented.
· Prevention or management of colic.
· Prevention of atopic disease.
· Infants with documented cow milk protein enteropathy or enterocolitis.
· Preterm infants who weigh <1800 grams.

(A & B Level Evidence)


Evidence
a. The Canadian Pediatric Society recommends against the use of soy formulas in the treatment of colic. Although there is some evidence to suggest that the use of soy formula may reduce the symptoms of colic; soy protein is known to be an allergen in infancy (1).

b. One study on the use of soy formula to treat colic found that although the symptoms of colic improved or disappeared in 50 out of 70 infants changed from cow milk formula to soy-based formula, eight of the 50 infants became intolerant of the soy formula (2).

c. A systematic review of the effectiveness of treatments for infantile colic suggested no clear benefit of using soy formula (3).

d. A Cochrane systematic review of the trials using non-cow milk-based formulas for the prevention of allergy and food intolerance in infants with a family history of atopy was performed. There were four studies which used soy as an alternative to cow milk-based formula, and results suggest that feeding soy did not reduce the risk of having asthma or wheeze at any age (4).

e. A separate Cochrane systematic review compared the use of soy formula versus human milk, cow milk-based formula or hydrolysed protein formula for the prevention of allergy and food intolerance. This review included five trials. One study suggested a decrease in childhood allergy, asthma and allergic rhinitis with soy formula. These results were not seen in any other study, and did not persist with the meta-analysis. However, studies comparing soy to protein hydrolysate formulas found a reduction in infant and childhood allergy using hydrolysate formula compared to soy (5). It was concluded that soy formulas should not be recommended for the prevention of allergy or food intolerance in high-risk infants.

References
1. Nutrition Committee, Canadian Pediatric Society (CPS). Dietary manipulations for infantile colic. Pediatrics and Child Health 2003; 8(7) : 449-452. Available from http://www.cps.ca/english/statements/n/ ... sept03.htm

2. Iacono G, Carroccio A, Montalto G et al. Severe infantile colic and food intolerance : A long-term prospective study. JPGN 1991; 12 : 332-335. Abstract available from : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/quer ... ery_hl=59; accessed 8 Dec 2005.

3. Lucassen PLBJ, Assendelft JW, Gubbels JW et al. Effectiveness of treatments for infantile colic : systematic review. BMJ 1998; 316 : 1563-1569. Abstract available from : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/quer ... ery_hl=61; accessed 8 Dec 2005.

4. Ram FSF, Ducharme FM, Scarlett J. Cow's milk protein avoidance and development of childhood wheeze in children with a family history of atopy. The Cochrane Library; The Cochrane Collaboration. Available from http://mrw.interscience.wiley.com/cochr ... frame.html

5. Osborn DA, Sinn J. Soy formula for prevention of allergy and food intolerance in infants. The Cochrane Library; The Cochrane Collaboration. Volume 3, 2005. Abstract available from : http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/quer ... ery_hl=65; accessed 8 Dec 2005.


When dd was an infant, they recomended that we add oil to her diet. Warning, the Gerber sippy cup valves worked fine but the silicone Playtex valves slid right out.

_________________
Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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 Post subject: Re: Putting weight on?
PostPosted: Tue Jul 06, 2010 9:17 pm 
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Joined: Fri Oct 02, 2009 8:06 pm
Posts: 217
Location: Terrebonne, Quebec
Susan - what kind of oil did you add to the drink?

_________________
Daughter 3.5 years) - Dairy, Eggs, Peanuts, Sesame, Beef; asthma and eczema
Daughter (2 years) - Peanuts Eczema
Son (7 months) - Contact allergy to something food undetermined


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 Post subject: Re: Putting weight on?
PostPosted: Tue Jul 06, 2010 11:49 pm 
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Site Admin

Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6490
Location: Ottawa
We added canola oil.

_________________
Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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 Post subject: Re: Putting weight on?
PostPosted: Wed Jul 07, 2010 8:44 am 
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Joined: Fri Oct 02, 2009 8:06 pm
Posts: 217
Location: Terrebonne, Quebec
I may try that out, thanks..

_________________
Daughter 3.5 years) - Dairy, Eggs, Peanuts, Sesame, Beef; asthma and eczema
Daughter (2 years) - Peanuts Eczema
Son (7 months) - Contact allergy to something food undetermined


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 Post subject: Re: Putting weight on?
PostPosted: Thu Jul 08, 2010 1:50 am 
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Joined: Tue Jul 01, 2008 7:26 pm
Posts: 28
Location: Vancouver, BC
My daughter is tiny: she's 2.5 years old and barely 20 lbs. She's never been on any growth chart. We've seen tons of specialists and they all blame her severely restricted diet, due to allergies, and possibly malnutrition early on before her allegies were diagnosed. The allergist, however, does not think her size has anything to do with her allergies. :confused

In any case, it is definitely hard to fatten them up when you there are food allergies involved: especially milk and eggs and soy and nuts/peanuts.

We also do the oil in food (olive oil) but honestly, beyond that at this point I've stopped stressing about it. But I definitely understand the concern.

_________________
6 year old son - eczema and sensitive skin
4 year old daughter - allergic to nuts, peanuts, sesame seeds, mustard and eggs; has outgrown allergies to wheat and legumes (by age 2) and to dairy, soy (by age 3.5).


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 Post subject: Re: Putting weight on?
PostPosted: Thu Jul 08, 2010 11:04 pm 
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Joined: Wed Aug 10, 2005 11:21 am
Posts: 687
Location: Cobourg, ON
When our daughter was diagnosed at Sicks Kids, the doctors told us to use soy formula for the first 2 years at which point we could change to soy milk. I remember our daughter's weight gain really slowed down in the second year as she began walking and then running and generally more active. There is always so much to worry about. My daughter was on the opposite end of the spectrum. She was incredibly large (weight wise) for her age in the first year. She was over 20 pounds by 4 months. I remember being stressed out about it. Other moms would make comments about her size and it would add to my concern.

_________________
13 year old daughter -- lives with life-threatening allergies to milk, tree nuts and peanuts; seasonal allergies (birch, maple, ragweed); pet allergies; asthma; and eczema
10 year old son - no allergies


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 Post subject: Re: Putting weight on?
PostPosted: Sat Oct 09, 2010 12:11 pm 
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Joined: Fri May 07, 2010 1:49 pm
Posts: 28
Location: Westlock, Alberta
Have you tried avocado? I combine half and avocado with a ripe banana and add a splash of vanilla rice milk and puree it in the blender. Once it's nice and smooth and creamy our DD will gobble it up. If it works for you at least it's a way to get some healthy fats into your little one.

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DD: 2.5 years old, allergic to milk, outgrown egg


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 Post subject: Re: Putting weight on?
PostPosted: Wed Dec 01, 2010 12:54 pm 
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Joined: Fri Oct 02, 2009 8:06 pm
Posts: 217
Location: Terrebonne, Quebec
Her 2 year appointment went as suspected. She has to go in in 3 months for a weigh in, because her weight dropped off a lot, she's about 5th percentile now, she used to be around 30th I think, so it's a big drop. The pediatrician we have is great, she sent us for blood tests to make sure there is nothing else wrong besides weight, and even tested for celiac (just in case -she said there were no signs except the weight).

The dietician we are in contact with now has suggested we look for a soy protein powder to add to her soy milk, too add protein, fat and sugars to her diet, since I didn't like the idea of the vanilla soy milk because there is added sugar in it. I'll probably go out this afternoon to see if I can find it, and if we can get that, then hopefully it will make a difference. We see the allergist in 2 weeks, and i'll ask about a possible challenge for baked egg/dairy, because that would help a bit I think (and make baking a bit easier).

Our other challenge now is finding pants that fit her! All the size 2 pants without the elastic drawstring int he waist don't fit, and I can't have her in leggings every day (and even the ones with the adjustable elastic look kind of stupid because they are like 1/2 size and all bunched up). I'm going to have to get creative with the sewing machine soon!

_________________
Daughter 3.5 years) - Dairy, Eggs, Peanuts, Sesame, Beef; asthma and eczema
Daughter (2 years) - Peanuts Eczema
Son (7 months) - Contact allergy to something food undetermined


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 Post subject: Re: Putting weight on?
PostPosted: Wed Dec 01, 2010 2:05 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jun 26, 2007 2:45 pm
Posts: 803
Location: Vancouver, BC
I know what you mean about the pants. My ds, who is now 4, and weighs less than 30 pounds can only wear pants with the adjustable waist. Regular elastic waist pants just fall off. Thank goodness for Old Navy! (and they deliver!)

Will she wear dresses and tights? That's what my 6yo dd wears everyday. She refuses to wear pants at all.

_________________
DD 2004 Allergy to peanuts, egg, sesame, and new: lentils and chick peas
DS 2006 Allergy to peanuts, tree nuts, milk, egg, kiwi fruit, eczema


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 Post subject: Re: Putting weight on?
PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2010 12:20 pm 
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Joined: Fri Oct 02, 2009 8:06 pm
Posts: 217
Location: Terrebonne, Quebec
Sadly, she hates dresses and tights.. she's a very gymnastic child and is always dancing around, rolling, and the dress seems to annoy her and get in her way..

_________________
Daughter 3.5 years) - Dairy, Eggs, Peanuts, Sesame, Beef; asthma and eczema
Daughter (2 years) - Peanuts Eczema
Son (7 months) - Contact allergy to something food undetermined


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