You are viewing Allergic Living Canada | Switch to United States

Talking Allergies

* FAQ    * Search
* Login   * Register
It is currently Tue Jul 29, 2014 12:56 am

All times are UTC - 4 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 11 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Need help
PostPosted: Mon Dec 03, 2007 12:59 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Dec 21, 2006 5:25 pm
Posts: 83
Location: Orleans, Ontario
Hello,

My 4 year old has asthma that is usually triggered by the cold virus, cold weather and vigorous exercise. We follow our allergist's recommended action plan to the letter. In the first few days of a cold we give him the blue puffer every four hours, and before going outside in the very cold weather or just before strenuous running activities.

My concern is that lately he seems to be gasping for air. This happens throughout the day whether he's running or just sitting watching television. This is not normal, anyone who is around him for any period of time notices and agrees that it is not normal. Of course I hate seeing him like that, knowing that his breathing is compromised.

I've talked to our new GP who was very dismissive, he listened to his lungs for 5 seconds, assured me that there was no wheezing therefore he's just fine. This doctor's apt went from bad to worse and I'm never going to him again, but in the meantime I would like to figure out what is happening to my little guy.

I asked to be referred to a respirologist, which the doctor said he would do, but it would take one year before I get an apt. It will take at least two months before I can see my allergist. What do I do in the meantime?

We started giving him Singulair again about one week ago, but I'm not noticing any differences yet. We've increased his orange puffer to two puffs morning and night and still no difference.

Has anyone else had to deal with this? Any ideas or suggestions that may provide relief while I wait for an apt with a specialist?

Thanks for your help

Denise

_________________
Oldest son 9: allergic to fish and shellfish, pollens, pets, mould and dustmites
Youngest son, 5: allergic to peanuts, nuts, dairy, eggs, sesame, kiwi, asthma, pollens, pets, mould and dustmites


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Dec 03, 2007 1:46 pm 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2005 6:39 pm
Posts: 2943
Location: Toronto
Hi Denise,

So sorry to hear about your bad doctor experience.

My strong suggestion: soonest call the The Ontario Lung's Asthma Helpline: 1-800-668-7682

They have 3 asthma educators available to take calls. If you explain the situation to them, I'm sure they'll have some ideas on what your son is experiencing and on how to get him in to see a specialist sooner rather than later.

best with it. Keep us posted. Gwen

_________________
Allergic to soy, peanut, shellfish, penicillin


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Dec 03, 2007 1:54 pm 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6455
Location: Ottawa
Denise, not all children wheeze with asthma. Our daughter has never wheezed.
I don't know singulair but the orange puffer takes some time to notice a change (days), don't give up on that.
If he is having trouble breathing, go to emerg.
Ask for the referral and contact the respirologist and ask to be placed on the cancelation list so they'll call you if some one cancels.
Good luck with that.

_________________
Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Dec 03, 2007 2:30 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Dec 21, 2006 5:25 pm
Posts: 83
Location: Orleans, Ontario
Thanks Susan and Gwen,

I agree that not all children wheeze with asthma, Liam has never wheezed either. I find though that Doctors seem to use that as the be all and end all when it comes to asthma, it's very frustrating.

I've just contacted the lung association, they suggested the same as you Susan, essentially to continue with a double dose of orange and if it doesn't work, to see a doctor about a combination medication.

I've also considered the emerg route, I think it may be our best bet if nothing else works. I just need to figure out when I have 5-8 hours to sit around and wait!!!

Thanks gals

Denise

_________________
Oldest son 9: allergic to fish and shellfish, pollens, pets, mould and dustmites
Youngest son, 5: allergic to peanuts, nuts, dairy, eggs, sesame, kiwi, asthma, pollens, pets, mould and dustmites


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Dec 03, 2007 9:22 pm 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6455
Location: Ottawa
Maybe you can bring your Christmas cards and address them all as you wait. 8)

_________________
Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jan 27, 2008 9:45 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
Denise - did you get in to see a Certified Astham Educator (CAE)?

In Ottawa, Rosario Holmes (CAE) is the best person to see. She is awesome, and I know I forwarded info to the OASG about her in the recent past.

The Lung Association Ottawa
2319 St. Laurent Blvd., Suite 500
(between Walkley & Conroy)
Ottawa, ON
613-230-4200

I highly recommend that anyone dealing with asthma see a CAE (via the Lung Association). It's free of charge as well.

I have found that some (many?) family physicians don't seem to know that much about asthma. When I asked my doctor 7 years ago if my youngest (7 months old at the time and showing a variety of symptoms) could have asthma, he said, "Oh no. He's got this kind of wheeze, and asthma is that kind of wheeze." A month later my youngest ended up at ER in CHEO, having a lot of difficulty breathing, with an oxygen level of 93, which apparently is very serious, and was immediately diagnosed as having athma.

Grrr... Part of the reason that asthma is so poorly treated sometimes (see other discussion) is because parents, even when they try hard to get help, get bad "expert" advice.

K.

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jan 27, 2008 10:21 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 10, 2005 11:21 am
Posts: 684
Location: Cobourg, ON
Could a new allergy or new exposure to an allergen be causing these increased symptoms? Did your little guy start school this year - this would be a new situation for him? Is there something at school causing this? My daughter's asthma got worse in her first year at school. Schools are not clean places. The carpets in kindergarten rooms should be burned in most schools. If you go the emergency route why not go to CHEO - you are in the Ottawa area right?
Good luck.
Kate

_________________
11 year old daughter -- lives with life-threatening allergies to milk, eggs and peanuts; seasonal allergies (birch, maple, ragweed); pet allergies; asthma; and eczema
9 year old son - no allergies


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Mar 29, 2008 1:40 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Mar 16, 2006 11:24 pm
Posts: 94
Location: Toronto area
Wow - I can relate to this! Hopefully by now (its March) things have evened out for your son. One of our sons didn't wheeze for years but I knew he was asthmatic - coughed continuously - specialist told us many kids have only the coughing form.....but can lead to wheeze.
Dealing with GP's or hospital Drs. - you gotta stand your ground and insist on him being seen by Paediatrician on call. Been there, done that - GP's listen for a few minutes (this is when you've just brought him in after he's been on everything you can give him at home) and say - 'he doesn't sound that bad'.....right....he's just had a nebulizer treatment before coming here to sit for 4 hrs! One episode of that, I refused to leave until the specialist was called - came in 1 hour later (by this time my son was in distress) and he bascally chewed out the GP for not admitting him.
If we deal with our children's asthma on a daily basis, we know their warning signs and limits - doctors need to realize that most parents have done everything in their power to keep their child OUT of hospital - so if I'm bringing him in, don't you think its because he's beyond help at home???!!!!!!
Respirologists and Asthma Educators are extremely helpful because this is the focus of their job - helping patients manage asthma/respiration.

_________________
4 out of 6 of us nut allergic (mom & 3 kids) - hey, who needs 'em! we're nutty enough!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Mar 30, 2008 11:51 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
Quote:
doctors need to realize that most parents have done everything in their power to keep their child OUT of hospital - so if I'm bringing him in, don't you think its because he's beyond help at home???!!!!!!


That is a really good point, Pepper. Something to quote next time any of us have to visit a doctor or hospital because of our kids' asthma! We don't want to have to take them to the doctor or hospital - we are at a point where we NEED to.

I feel so blessed to have an allergist who really understands asthma and also to have found Rosario (Certified Asthma Educator), and who together have helped us understand my son's asthma and get it under control. It's made a real difference in our lives.

K.

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Mar 30, 2008 2:10 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Dec 21, 2006 5:25 pm
Posts: 83
Location: Orleans, Ontario
Thank you all for your responses and helpful insight.

We have been to see a respirologiste and she was most helpful. I was most impressed with the depth of the intake questions. She has confirmed that given my son's history, predisposition as well as his patterns, he most likely does have asthma.

She did however say that his funny breathing is not asthma which is reassuring, but I still don't like it when he breathes that way. It seems however that he is doing much less these days. I still don't understand why he does it or what triggers it.

The most valuable piece of info that I left with was concerning the dosage of Flovent. During the peak season we would administer one puff/twice a day of the 125mcg and 1 puff/twice a day of the 50 mcg during the summer and low seasons. When things got worse during a cold, I hesitated at increasing the dosage of the 125 mcg believing that that was a megadose of sorts. She said that the 125mcg/twice a day is the most common base dose for most of her patients and is considered at the low end of the spectrum.

She explained how when we were giving him one dose of the 50mcg/twice a day over the summer it was as if we were in fact giving him nothing. She compared it to an adult walking in with a pounding headache and being offered one half of a child's aspirin. It would do absolutely nothing for that adults headache. The 50m mcg/twice a day was similarly doing nothing to help with our son's asthma.

I left feeling empowered again and well supported. She is going to continue to monitor him and it feels good to know that he is being followed by someone who truly knows and understands asthma.

Denise

_________________
Oldest son 9: allergic to fish and shellfish, pollens, pets, mould and dustmites
Youngest son, 5: allergic to peanuts, nuts, dairy, eggs, sesame, kiwi, asthma, pollens, pets, mould and dustmites


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Mar 30, 2008 6:45 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Mar 16, 2006 11:24 pm
Posts: 94
Location: Toronto area
Trilliam, you and your son are truly fortunate to have a medical person who is so aware of her field. Treatment of asthma and prevention of such has come leaps and bounds since my kids were small. Prevention is key in treating allergies and asthma, as most of us are all too aware. Tell your respirologist how much she is appreciated next time you see her - it'll make her day! Having said that though, don't drop your guard concerning your son's unusual breathing pattern - if you're concerned, keep monitoring it and asking questions. My younger son (the more severe asthmatic of the family) was sick and losing weight for 2 1/2 years before it was determined what was truly wrong - and all that time I was told it was "likely nothing - he'll grow out of it" ! Finally found out when he hit a severely dangerous low weight of 60 lbs (he was grade 8 at the time) that he was hypoglycemic.....so all the time when I kept telling doctors that something was wrong and getting the brush off - turned out my instincts were right. Follow your instincts - you know your child better than any doctor who only sees him for short periods of time. If you have a children's hospital nearby - ask to be sent there - that's what finally helped us.

_________________
4 out of 6 of us nut allergic (mom & 3 kids) - hey, who needs 'em! we're nutty enough!


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 11 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 4 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group