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 Post subject: What next?
PostPosted: Fri Feb 24, 2006 5:40 pm 
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Joined: Fri Feb 24, 2006 5:26 pm
Posts: 12
Location: Erin, Ontario
Hi there,

I am a newbie on this Forum as my dd has a peanut allergy. She has her allergy testing the end of March!

What do I do until then. I have so many questions..... Do we go totally peanut/ nut free in our home . What other precautions do we take? We did get the Twinjet Epi-pen after visiting our family doctor this week.

Any help or suggestions are welcomed. I am still getting use to the fact that dd has this life threating allergy! Are there any support groups for parents of kids like mine.

Thanks
LT :( :(


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Feb 24, 2006 6:09 pm 
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Joined: Fri Jan 06, 2006 8:22 pm
Posts: 154
Location: Georgia
newpeanutkid
How old?
What were her symptoms? How did you find out about the peanut allergy?

Just a few questions to get started.
Welcome,
Daisy :)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Feb 27, 2006 2:31 pm 
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Joined: Wed Aug 10, 2005 11:21 am
Posts: 687
Location: Cobourg, ON
It sounds like the allergy was just discovered, so you will be overwhelmed trying to figure everything out. When we discovered our daughter's allergies (milk, eggs, peanuts), we tried to cook milk free for her and add milk to our own meals. It became too difficult and mistakes were made and mild reactions happened. So I would suggest making your home nut free (as best you can) so that your child (and you) will not need to worry as much about accidental exposures. You will need to eliminate any foods bought at bulk food stores (spices, dried fruits etc.) because there is too much risk of cross contamination. When you are cleaning out your cupboards and you are not sure if an open container of food (flour, sugar, jam) might have been exposed to nuts - throw it out. When in doubt throw it out.

Read labels 3 times - when buying your food, putting it away, and when using it. The good news is that new labeling laws require manufacturers to list nut ingredients. The bad news is that trace ingredients are not required to be listed. I usually call food companies to find out if there product is made in a nut free facility. We generally stick to large companies like Kraft, General Mills, Dare which have good labelling policies.

Read lots and take your twinject everywhere.
Good luck.
Kate


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Feb 27, 2006 3:04 pm 
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Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 9:38 pm
Posts: 1643
Location: Toronto
If you haven't already got one, get the twinject demonstrator.

www.twinject.ca you can order for free at their web-site. Some people have said it's available free at pharmacies as well.

Familiarize yourself with it, as well as anyone that will be caring for your child. Depending on child's age, you might want to let her try it as well. (The demonstrator has no needle and no medicine.)

Even when nobody is going to be eating - always have the twinject with your daughter. ALWAYS


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Feb 27, 2006 11:42 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
I second the suggestion to get a Twinject demonstrator (or EpiPen trainer for those who have been prescribed an EpiPen). It's critical. You need it to show others how to use it. And you need it to practice with. And in my opinion, it's especially critical with the Twinject auto-injector, which is more complicated if you have to give the second dose.

I would also suggest viewing the training video at the Twinject site. I have had a recent spate of people telling me that they were not shown how to use the EpiPen or Twinject (grrrr), and it is so important that you know how to.

For English Twinject training, go to http://www.twinject.ca/en/training.php.

For those using EpiPens, go to http://www.epipen.com/ and click on How to Use EpiPen.

I also second the suggestion to go totally peanut and nut free in the home. I personally just don't think it's worth the stress or risk. And I have to say, I don't think it's really difficult to do, once you have your list of safe foods worked out.

K.

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


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 Post subject: Thanks for all the info!
PostPosted: Tue Feb 28, 2006 12:46 am 
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Joined: Fri Feb 24, 2006 5:26 pm
Posts: 12
Location: Erin, Ontario
I wanted to thank eveyone for the replies.

I am still getting use to the fact that all of this is real and trying to get my husband to understand all the implications.

I have not stopped doing research when I can and it is helping. I did get the Twinjet but funny thing my Dr nor pharmacist told me how to use. I was still in stock after leaving the office so I did not even ask either.

This weekend I was on the Twinjet website and did order a demo unit. I am trying to make sure I always have my Twinjet with me. What do you do with it if you say drop your kid off at a sports event ( gymnastics )?? Right now I am present in the facility ( she is turning 4 next month ) but what about when she is older?

Where do I start with the ok Food list? Any suggestions ?? I can not believe all the food that have traces of peanuts or made in facilities where there is peanuts or nuts!!! I was going to but my girls a popscicle today and read " May contain traces of peanuts"
Ice Cream is not safe ( Chapmans is Peanut free!! ) Crackers that I have purchases before and they also have been serving them at my Daughters Nursery school! Not anymore as of this weekend!!! What about the food products out there that do not list the traces?

If a peanut allergic child is exposed to traces without say knowing , over time could they become more allergic ( Reaction more severe)??? My husband thinks we just need to ensure we have the Twinjet and we are OK! Regards, Lori :)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Feb 28, 2006 11:04 am 
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Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 9:38 pm
Posts: 1643
Location: Toronto
My son has been carrying his own epi-pen since he was about 5 years old. I purchased a zonii e-belt (purchased through Medic-alert). There are other carriers available, but I like this one because it is just a belt with a tube to carry the pen. The twinject also fits in it. If he runs into the playscape there is no risk of the epi-pen (or twinject) breaking. He is not expected to self-administer, but if he's at school and has a reaction, they don't have to waste time trying to find his medicine.

In my home, I'm the one with the peanut allergy. (My youngest is allergic to bites/stings.) We have a peanut and sesame seed allergy (I'm also allergic to them). The risk of contaminating my food is to great and just not worth it. We chose to not ban *may contain* items though. I do have to keep a mental list of what foods in my home I cannot eat - and I recheck all labels before I do eat. This might be a bit harder to do with a child because they might feel if it's in their home it is safe.

************

Ensuring your have the twinject is important. It's the SECOND step though. The first step is TOTAL AVOIDANCE. It's kind of like looking both ways after you've stepped onto the road. Sometimes there won't be any car there. Sometimes you can get out of the way in time. And sometimes you get hit.

*********

Not sure where you are, but in Canada, Christie Crackers (and cookies) put allergy alerts on their packaging. They do have quite a few crackers that do not have a warning for peanut.


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 Post subject: Newbie too!
PostPosted: Sat Apr 01, 2006 11:44 am 
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Joined: Sun Mar 05, 2006 1:05 pm
Posts: 528
Location: Burlington, Ontario
Hi Newpeanutkid,

We are new at this too. On February 17th, my 14 year old had an English muffin with peanut butter. She had been eating peanut butter all her life. Twenty-five minutes later, she had bad stomach cramps, started vomitting and an hour later the skin on her trunk had turned beet red, as if she had a bad sunburn. Her arms were covered with welts. That's when I realized that it was a peanut allergy and we ended up at the hospital.

It is extremely overwhelming at first. A previous post said that total avoidance is the first step and that is very correct. My husband was a bit like yours at first. I am now educating him and everyone around us. Not always an easy task but you must become your child's advocate. You should teach everyone to use the epipen (or twinject in your case). I print out a sheet with instructions that I give to everyone. I also included the signs of anaphylaxis.

Our house has been cleaned of all peanuts, including products that "may contain". We have become label readers and company phoners, including the pet food company (turns out that the dog food is manufactured in a company that handles peanut hulls and is not safe. We had to switch to the canned version!).

This website and forum is wonderful and I also found a lot of useful info about manufacturers at www.peanutaware.com. Print out material and get your hubby to read it.

My daughter was disappointed that she couldn't have peanut butter and reeses peanut butter cups (her favourites) anymore, but I am buying other, safe treats. Dare is a wonderful company that makes a lot of peanut/nut free products, including some fun candy for Easter, Bear Paws and Wagon Wheels (don't buy the McCormick Wagon wheels, as that brand is not safe but Dare's is). Kelloggs products are all safe if they don't have a warning, same goes for General Mills products (and that's a lot of products). Of course, there's also Chapman ice cream, another wonderful company.

We now avoid any bakery bread, rolls, cakes and pastries, we only buy from big companies like Dempster's. Dempster's makes a nice crusty bread, they are in the frozen section and you warm them up in the oven.

We are still learning what she can and cannot have and adding foods as we go, or subtracting as the case may be.

Eating out is tricky too, but not impossible. You have to inform your waiter/waitress. We have eaten at East Side Mario's, where the food is safe with the exception of the desserts, so we simply skip dessert.

You have to teach her also that she cannot take food from anybody unless you okay it. I realize it's harder with a little one. At 14, my daughter reads her own labels, it's a little easier. But she has a best friend who has peanut/nut allergies and she has always led a very active, normal life, so your daughter can too. :)

Good luck!


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