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PostPosted: Fri Dec 15, 2006 5:48 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 12:17 pm
Posts: 249
Location: Niagara region, Ontario
I was wondering if anyone has any thoughts on the safely of reuseable water bottles (not the disposeable one time use kind). I would especiallly appreciate Lance's thoughts if he reads this.

I read in a magazine that Health Canada is studying the safety of Nalgene water bottles, so I have stopped my kids from using theirs anymore. Some searching on the internet, and another magazine article suggest not using water bottles that have a 1 or 7 on the bottom. (The recycle number in the triangle). I had just bought three new sports bottles for my kids for Christmas and they are all number 1's!! I believe the Nalgene ones are 7's.

I don't like using the bottled water as it is such a strain on the environment. Luckily some of my kids sports bottles are number 4's, so I can keep using those. Have any of you seen some reliable info out there?

Soccermom


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 18, 2007 4:47 pm 
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Joined: Mon Nov 20, 2006 7:30 pm
Posts: 19
Location: Burnaby, BC
Available consumer information on plastics is contained in the It's Your Health publication on Microwave Ovens and Food Safety:

http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/iyh-vsv/prod/micro-f-a_e.html

Information on the Food Directorate Packaging Materials program is available at:

http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/securit/packag-emball/index_e.html

This page provides a description of our pre-market assessment programs for food packaging materials as well as a link to the list of acceptable polymers for use in food packaging applications. These pages are not really designed for the consumer and do not really provide answers about safe water or drink bottles. The sale of bottles for water or drink, not containing food, excludes them from the purview of our Foods Direcorate. Reusable polycarbonate bottles (e.g. Nalgene) are not subject to the requirements of Division 23 of the Food and Drug Regulations (Food Packaging Materials) or to the general provisions of the Food & Drugs Act since they are sold as empty containers. These bottles fall under the jurisdiction of the Consumer Product Safety Bureau of Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch (also responsible for toys, cosmetics, etc..)

In absence of any prepared information and for those interested in doing their own reading on this subject here are some references that may be of assistance:

A guide to the recycle symbols that you may find on the bottom of containers is available at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resin_identification_code[/url]

Iinformation on Nalgene posted on Wikipedia is informative along with the link at the bottom to the Nalgene website:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nalgene

http://www.nalgenelabware.com/techdata/technical/phthalates.asp

Wikipedia also has a very good entries on polyethylene which apply to type 4 (LDPE):

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polyethylene

and type 1 (PET or PETE): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polyethylene_terephthalate

For those interested in the issue of antimony leaching from PET containers read:

http://plasticsinfo.org/s_plasticsinfo/sec_level3_collapsed.asp?CID=657&DID=2594

http://www.plasticsinfo.org/s_plasticsinfo/sec_level2_faq.asp?CID=705&DID=2839

PET is commonly used in the production of smaller water bottles. While these bottles are designed for single use, they are frequently re-used and from a chemical safety perspective this should not pose a safety concern as long as they are clean. However, if there is any doubt about their cleanliness, they should be discarded.

Health Canada is well aware of the antimony issue. We have reviewed the matter and, based on the data available to date, the antimony levels in bottled water are not considered to pose a concern to human health. Nevertheless, we are continuing to monitor this issue and will review any new data as it becomes available.

One of the substances used in the production of polycarbonate resins is Bisphenol-A (BPA). To date, theoretical estimates of human exposure to BPA from dietary sources have been found to be well below tolerable intake levels. We are currently reviewing the most recent studies relating to BPA to ensure that the BPA risk assessment is as up-to-date as possible.

In closing, I can comment that at this time our Food Directorate is not aware of any safety concerns when such bottles are used as directed. I also note that as this in not an uncommon question, I have forwarded a suggestion that we consider developing some information on this subject that would be directed and available to the consumer.

I trust this is helpful.

_________________
Lance Hill
Regional Food Liaison Officer
Health Canada


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 18, 2007 8:23 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 12:17 pm
Posts: 249
Location: Niagara region, Ontario
Lance,

You're the best!!

Thanks so much,

Soccermom


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