You are viewing Allergic Living Canada | Switch to United States

Talking Allergies

* FAQ    * Search
* Login   * Register
It is currently Sat Sep 20, 2014 10:05 am

All times are UTC - 4 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 20 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Reaction to walnut
PostPosted: Sat Jun 30, 2007 12:35 pm 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6462
Location: Ottawa
Well, I guess I will now be viewing the posts in this section.
Last evening my husband tested our daughter with walnut. She has avoided all tree nuts and peanuts from the time she was diagnosed with food allergies but as she is now 5, the allergist felt we could introduce nuts. No testing until a reaction has occured as you wouldn't have the IGE's with out that first exposure. Well, she must have had trace exposure as she reacted last night.
I must say that I credit this website and my local support group for our most positive experience. I arrived home just minutes after he offered her a smal piece of walnut. She was complaining of hives on her lip. We decided to prepare a bag for the hospital (toy, blanket, food, drink, etc) while watched for more symptoms (hind sight- next time we will immediately give Epi-Pen and call 911-list of supplies will be left on fridge for my husband to prepare the bag and follow in the car).
As soon as she started to cough and develop some facial swelling we administered the Epi-Pen (brave little girl, she didn't object at all-just squeezed my finger). Ambulance came and it all went very smoothly.
I think what was different this time was that we knew she was eating something that was a potential allergen, it is not something that we have always eaten so avoidance is just business as usual, we had been through the anaphylaxic experience before and we were all together and could discuss the plan as events unfolded.
We gave the medication so quickly, the reaction did not get very bad (no eyes swelling shut and today she just has allergic shiners and is stuffed up.
I hope that she will learn from this experience that while anaphylaxis is a life threatening situation, the Epi-Pen + 911 combo does work at keeping her safe. Can I really believe that an ana experience can allieviate anxiety? Is it the lack of sleep talking?

_________________
Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jun 30, 2007 4:58 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Sep 16, 2006 6:50 pm
Posts: 205
Location: Ontario, Canada
Hi Susan,

Having just been through a similar event about 3 weeks ago, I can tell you some of the positives that has come out of it:

1. My 3.5 year old is taking more responsability for her allergy. She knows she does not want the Epi/hospital combo again.

2. I am more prepared for a future reaction. I know what to do and what not to do.

3. We are talking more about the allergy. She even reinacted the entire event with her stuffed toys in a positive way ( the toy ate the nut and she gave the epi and took care of him in the play hospital). I think this is a healthy thing.

It is an awful thing to go through. I am still not sleeping well but this forum has really helped me through the ordeal. Other people just don't seem to get the huge responsability we have to carry 24 hours a day.

Take care of yourself.

_________________
daughter: 6 years tree nuts, peanuts


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Oh Susan!
PostPosted: Sat Jun 30, 2007 7:04 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jan 10, 2006 9:25 pm
Posts: 238
Location: Thornhill
First of all - I FEEL FOR YOU. In a way, reactions are reassuring - they reinforce that you (collective family unit/caregivers) know how to react and will. And frankly, I almost burst into tears (try not to) when I see how fast that G-d blessed epinephrine WORKS.

I don't think it is the sleep deprivation talking - our DD's last reaction was positive as we did have LOTS of dialogue after it. It helped her "get it" since we fortunately had a span of time without serious reactions. No matter what, knowledge is power and for your little one, she now has a very concrete event that can be spun in a positive light. For our girl, I think that the abstract concept of allergies was more difficult - the big reaction made it real and she has been much more involved in knowing that she doesn't go anywhere without the epipens and she understands now that even though they hurt, they HELP.

Few extra thoughts for you:
-- Unless they were walnuts bought in the shell, remember that there could be traces of other nuts or seeds.
--I really like the advice that I was given about new food introduction to expose her skin to a potential allergen in a progressive way rather than an oral exposure.
--We never trial foods in the afternoon/evening. If we're going to have the hours of observation, it may as well be in the day and then I also control my anxiety better when we put her to bed, as there are a lot more hours of observation - the other reason for us to do this is on two occasions, she had "sleeper" or delayed reactions.

Another aside, I am thinking of allowing her to play with an epipen trainer (she has also been practicing on animals as has Gem's daughter). More empowerment, at least I hope.

My thoughts are with you...
Get some rest !!!! and thanks for all the support you've given!

_________________
renie
daughter: ana for egg, sesame, dairy, pistachio/cashew/hazelnut. on contact. allergic+ to soy protein isolate, environmental allergies (e.g. dogs, dust mites). asthma. eczema.
son: peanuts, tree-nuts, OAS, environmental allergies. asthma.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jun 30, 2007 9:42 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Apr 11, 2005 9:38 pm
Posts: 926
Location: Oakville, Ontario
Hi Susan,

Glad to hear your daughter is okay - and mom & dad are too! Thank you for sharing your experience and what you feel you managed well and would change if there ever was a next time.

We also just experienced another anaphylactic reaction with our 5 year old son about 3 weeks ago. I haven't talked about it on the forum (to date) because I'm still pretty emotional about it. But what I did feel we did "right" was administer the Epipen right away and called 911 right away. We spent several hours at the hospital and our son did not require any further medication. It was AMAZING to see how quickly the epinephrine brought his allergic reaction under control. Within 5 minutes, his throat no longer had "something stuck in there" (his description) and his colouring returned to normal. It was very scary and I can barely talk about it now. It's only the second time we've administered the Epipen, but I would NOT hesitate to do so again, should the need arise. Seeing the very fast change in symptoms is such a relief after feeling such fear (not that our son knew how fearful we are) when you see the reaction. Our daughter (without food allergies) was EXTREMELY distressed and frightened by the situation, but we later emphasized the importance of always being prepared, doing what needed to be done, and then life gets right back to normal the next day. We made sure we had a very normal day the next day including playing outside with the neighbourhood kids so our kids would (hopefully) not be frightened by the need to use the Epipen should the need ever arise again.

Big hugs to you and your family. I'm so sorry you've had to had tree nuts to your list of allergens.

_________________
15 yr old daughter: no health issues
12 yr old son: allergic to peanuts, tree nuts, eggs, fish, sesame, sunflower, mustard, poppy seeds, green peas, some fruits, instructed to avoid all other legumes (except soy & green beans), pollen, cats, horses


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jul 02, 2007 7:59 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
Hi Susan -

I'm so sorry that you've had to add another allergen to the list, but you know we are here for you!

Good on you all for how you dealt with the emergency, and I'm glad that the forum and group helped you guys get through the experience.

Big hugs to you and your daughter AND your husband.

K.

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 03, 2007 9:22 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Apr 16, 2005 12:09 am
Posts: 1054
Hi Susan -- big hugs to you and your family. I'm sorry too that you have to add another allergen to the list. What a brave little girl you have! She (and you!) should be very proud! :)

You know, I asked our allergist about skin prick testing for tree nuts without previous exposure and the validity of the results (my son has only ever had exposure to peanuts, almonds, walnuts) and he told me that it wouldn't affect the results. That he would definitely have received trace exposures along the way (perhaps through breast milk? -- I'll have to clarify this when I see him next). Sure enough, Ethan ended up testing mildly positive to all of the tree nuts except almond where his SPT was quite significant and walnut which was negative. Strangely enough, he'd eaten almonds regularly in an almond cranberry granola bar before his reaction to peanut (and FA diagnosis). Almond was one I was sure he wouldn't show a reaction to. And it ended up being the largest reaction of the tree nuts? Isn't that strange?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 03, 2007 9:37 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jan 10, 2006 9:25 pm
Posts: 238
Location: Thornhill
SPT? Skin Prick Test?
While we've been dealing with ana for quite some time, we've been isolated (until now) so I'm not up on acronyms... Forgive my ignorance....

Is the prick reaction indicative of allergy severity? I have read opposing opinions on this. Hard to believe it isn't, with our girl, for her allergens, she doesn't even need to be pricked, although of course the allergist does... she hives and depending on the test, gets irritable as soon as the little test tool touches her skin...

_________________
renie
daughter: ana for egg, sesame, dairy, pistachio/cashew/hazelnut. on contact. allergic+ to soy protein isolate, environmental allergies (e.g. dogs, dust mites). asthma. eczema.
son: peanuts, tree-nuts, OAS, environmental allergies. asthma.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 03, 2007 8:59 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Apr 16, 2005 12:09 am
Posts: 1054
yes, you're right renie.
As I'm still a little unclear about what a positive SPT actually means, I've done a little searching and found this:

Quote:
Prick Tests (also called scratch or puncture tests)

Method: A liquid containing particles of an allergen is placed on the skin and the skin is pricked or scratched with a needle. You can be tested for up to 30 different allergies at the same time, but this would mean 30 separate pricks. Most people do not have such a large number of allergens tested. Your doctor can select those substances that are most suspicious as possible causes of your allergy symptoms.

When Recommended: When your medical history suggests an allergy but the source of the allergy is not obvious. Also, these tests also can be helpful to help plan treatment if you and your doctor are considering allergy shots (immunotherapy). These tests are recommended to check for allergy after a large local reaction to an insect sting, or symptoms after a sting that suggest allergy (such as throat swelling or wheezing).

Preparation: Stop taking antihistamines two to five days before the test (the length of time depends on the particular drug you've been taking; your doctor can advise you).

Discomfort: Not painful, but can cause itching. The needle doesn't penetrate deep enough to cause bleeding.

Reliability: Frequently helpful for identifying major airborne allergies (pollens, molds, dust mites, animal dander, and cockroach proteins). It can produce positive results for foods even when you do not have a true allergy, however. With the exception of some fruit and vegetable allergies, food skin tests can be helpful when there is no reaction; in that case, you can be reassured that it is about 95 percent likely you are not allergic to the specific food.

Results: If you are allergic, a raised red mark may develop within 20 minutes at the site of the scratch. No reaction means you're probably not allergic. You can have a positive reaction to a substance (especially a food) that you are not allergic to.

Risk: Extremely small risk of an anaphylactic reaction.

Precautions: Because of the risk, a doctor should be present and emergency equipment should be available.

taken from: http://www.intelihealth.com/IH/ihtIH/WS ... dmtContent

Reading this, it makes me question SPT results in the absence of any other info to put it into context.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jul 04, 2007 11:57 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jan 10, 2006 9:25 pm
Posts: 238
Location: Thornhill
Fascinating! Thanks for sharing. Our allergist only tests suspected allergens as a means of confirming. I am going to have to ask him about soy vs. soy protein isolate.

What are you going to do about almonds, if he has been tolerating them? Seems unfortunate to restrict if he's not allergic, unless he has a proven nut allergy and you are concerned about cross contamination?

I've just bought some almonds and walnuts in the shell to test with our DD. Of course, I forgot the nutcracker! Not always the brightest person...

_________________
renie
daughter: ana for egg, sesame, dairy, pistachio/cashew/hazelnut. on contact. allergic+ to soy protein isolate, environmental allergies (e.g. dogs, dust mites). asthma. eczema.
son: peanuts, tree-nuts, OAS, environmental allergies. asthma.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jul 04, 2007 10:01 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Sep 16, 2006 6:50 pm
Posts: 205
Location: Ontario, Canada
I think you need a blood test to test allergy severity.

We have just done the skin prick test which didn't register anything the first try. The second try the allergist said my daughter had a mild allergy according to the skin test. I then told him she had anaphylaxed on one nut ( throat closing within minutes etc). He then upgraded her to "mild to moderate" (???) :shock:

_________________
daughter: 6 years tree nuts, peanuts


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jul 05, 2007 8:44 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jan 10, 2006 9:25 pm
Posts: 238
Location: Thornhill
Gem! My mouth is agape! Mild to moderate! :? At least you KNOW regardless what the skin prick test said

_________________
renie
daughter: ana for egg, sesame, dairy, pistachio/cashew/hazelnut. on contact. allergic+ to soy protein isolate, environmental allergies (e.g. dogs, dust mites). asthma. eczema.
son: peanuts, tree-nuts, OAS, environmental allergies. asthma.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jul 06, 2007 12:18 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
My understanding is this:

1. There is no test that will predict the severity of a reaction. Blood tests and skin prick tests are used by allergists along with the patient history to help them diagnose the allergy. But there is nothing at the moment that lets anyone predict how severe a reaction will be.

2. The gold standard test is to eat the food - if you do not react, you are not allergic. If you react, you are allergic. That is why they have food challenges sometimes... the skin prick test and blood test give an indication that the person is not allergic to the food, and the food challenge (if successful) confirms this. Same goes with history - it's an important part of the diagnosis. Obviously if a test is negative but the person has had a severe reaction to the food, they are allergic.

K.

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jul 06, 2007 9:14 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jan 10, 2006 9:25 pm
Posts: 238
Location: Thornhill
I suppose trying to get a read on severity is irrelevant anyway, since one can become ana although let's hope that we can positive-think the trend toward outgrowing instead...

_________________
renie
daughter: ana for egg, sesame, dairy, pistachio/cashew/hazelnut. on contact. allergic+ to soy protein isolate, environmental allergies (e.g. dogs, dust mites). asthma. eczema.
son: peanuts, tree-nuts, OAS, environmental allergies. asthma.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jul 08, 2007 4:32 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
It's funny - a bunch of us were just talking about what concrete things we'd like researchers to come up with in the very near future, and the ability to predict the severity of a reaction was at the top of our list. I guess "finding a cure" just seems too far away to us, and maybe outgrowing the allergy sometimes does too!!

But it's good to think positively. ;)

K.

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jul 08, 2007 9:31 pm 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2005 6:39 pm
Posts: 2946
Location: Toronto
Belatedly to Susan - So sorry you're now dealing with nut.

But sounds like you and your husband and daughter all dealt with the reaction really well. Good for you. I hope she is back to herself now.

And Julie, so sorry to hear about your little guy. Hope both he and your daughter are getting past the experience. Epinephrine is amazing inside you during a reaction, I can tell you. It feels like someone abruptly shut off the anaphylaxis tap.

_________________
Allergic to soy, peanut, shellfish, penicillin


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 20 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC - 4 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group