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PostPosted: Thu Apr 12, 2007 1:39 pm 
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Joined: Thu Sep 22, 2005 11:39 pm
Posts: 1141
Location: saskatchewan, canada
Quote:
So, saskmommy, while I agree the school has to be prepared, willing, and able to provide the care, I also feel that we as parents need to pay attention when they have concerns/objections and work together with them. It's the same medicine in either container. I don't see the value in fighting over which one is administered.

Anyway, I'm going to back out of this thread. I seem to be upsetting you. (Maybe it's the tone I'm reading in, not the tone you are writing in -- can never really tell. Either way, I'm not interested in upsetting anyone. )


I'm not upset...just curious as to how all the other childhood health conditions are dealt with (or not dealt with?). I would be interested to know the answer to the insulin question Andrea asked as well. It just seems kids with allergies get the short end of the stick alot. So while I have chosen to keep my girls home...their friends with allergies attend public school and it seems very scary to me how little anyone seems to care. Yes, the teachers recieved training on the epi pen, and admit they're scared to use it, ...but continue to provide an environment that just seems way to risky. I would sure hate for something to happen to my kids friends. Maybe that's just because I'm in a province without a "Sabrinas law"...but I'm just wondering what the overall plan is for kids with health issues...

Yes, I'm sure everyone here has multiple twinjects/epi's at their kids school...but not everyone provides multiples...sometimes the schools loose them...and as Helen experienced...one did not work. It just seems odd to me that school districts would not allow twinject, or absolutely REFUSE to administer a second dose if needed. It just doesn't give me a "warm fuzzy feeling".

_________________
DD age 9 1/2 -peanuts, nuts,
DD age 7 1/2 - milk, eggs, chicken, peanuts, treenuts, cats, dogs,
DS age 2 1/2
Husband- asthma, eggs, treenuts, fish, shellfish environmental
Self - penicillan, eurithromiacin, mild laytex allergy.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Apr 12, 2007 8:22 pm 
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Joined: Sat Sep 16, 2006 6:50 pm
Posts: 205
Location: Ontario, Canada
I believe that most children in Ontario, who have serious health issues that require daily treatment would have an Educational Assistant attached to that child. I could be wrong. There is a diabetic child with epilepsy at my school and there is an EA in the class.

_________________
daughter: 6 years tree nuts, peanuts


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 30, 2007 5:23 am 
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Joined: Wed May 31, 2006 12:18 am
Posts: 45
Location: Edmonton
My GP recommended over the summer that i should get Twinject. But it's not covered by our health plan yet (which typically covers everything) i should check with my pharmacy about getting a second Epipen for the kitchen though. My parents' health plan no longer pays the dispensation fee for injectables or inhalants. Luckily our pharmacy put a note in my file not to charge me the fee for my Epi-pen (I've had to go to emerg. twice in 2 months so i needed a new epipen each time).
I would feel a lot safer with Twinject though. My house is just a couple minutes away from the Grey Nun's hospital in Edmonton so it's unlikely i would need a second dose in that case, but my last 2 reactions weren't at home. Luckily both times I was on the U of A campus so the hospital was right there, but now i'm on a different campus, which could potentially take more than15 minutes between taking the first dose and the ambulance arriving.

_________________
Anaphylaxis to fish, nut, peanuts, soy, birch, and grass.
OAS


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jul 15, 2007 11:12 am 
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Joined: Sun Oct 08, 2006 10:53 am
Posts: 207
Location: Winnipeg, MB
Went to the Dr. for a prescription refill and he really was pushing the Twinject. When I expressed my concern for how complicated it was, he pulled out the trainer, took off the end cap, poked his leg and said sarcastically "oh, yeah, that was tough" . Then, when I said asked about shot # 2, he couldn't get it out of the trainer! Score one point for me!

I see his point about having two shots available at all times. For now we have a refill for two Epipens and have ordered a Twinject trainer. We'll practice with it until we're very comfortable before switching over. I still think we'll keep Epipens around for school and backup, but Twinject seems to be the new gold standard.

M

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adult son allergic to peanuts, most tree nuts, eggs and penicillin.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jul 15, 2007 11:45 am 
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Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
You might want to check if the school will allow Twinjects... Some school boards will not allow students to carry Twinjects at all, while others will allow it but will only let teachers administer the first dose. That has been a consideration for parents in my local support group, as a few Ottawa boards have made decisions like this.

As for the doc being sarcastic, I find that really upsetting. I hope that having problems with the second dose put him in his place a bit - and validated your very real concerns.

K.

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jul 19, 2007 8:49 pm 
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Joined: Sun Oct 08, 2006 10:53 am
Posts: 207
Location: Winnipeg, MB
I received my trainer Twinject today. Can't really get used to it. It doesn't "click" like the Epipen does when you KNOW you've done the injection. On the trainer the grey part that covers the needle only moves about 5mm and I'm not sure if that is representational of how far it really moves and how it feels. It just didn't feel like it did anything. With the Epipen (trainer and real thing) you KNOW when it's activated.

The second shot also doesn't let you know what the plunger is like. I don't think they did a very good job of creating the tester and I'm not sure if this will help me with converting to the Twinject.

We'll have to keep trying, but I'm not convinced yet!

_________________
adult son allergic to peanuts, most tree nuts, eggs and penicillin.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jul 19, 2007 9:18 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
Why not ask you local pharmacies if they have expired real Twinjects that you can practice with? We've been able to practice with a few of our own (expired finally) and that does give you a better idea of how it all works.

K.

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jul 20, 2007 8:15 am 
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Joined: Sat Sep 16, 2006 6:50 pm
Posts: 205
Location: Ontario, Canada
I felt the same way about the Twinject trainer. When I had to use it , it was no problem. It ejects with less pressure than I used on the Epi trainer.

_________________
daughter: 6 years tree nuts, peanuts


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Aug 20, 2007 3:01 am 
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Joined: Wed Aug 15, 2007 1:40 am
Posts: 423
Location: Alberta, Canada
I just don't get this debate! This is not an everyday situation like a feeding tube where someone needs training ... This is an emergency and I think most of us are not comfortable with many situations that we may face in an emergency. we as people should do what we can be it to give an epi-pen or a twin ject or to tend to a broken bone or open wound we are not all emergency tech. trained ! This is not to be a nurse or doctor it is just until help arrives. I may be wrong but I believe you cannot harm a child by giving an epi pen/twinject but a child can be in harms way if no epi pen/twinject is given. I think, if this is true it is very important for teachers or anyone in a position to give the epi pen/twinjiect that they know they cannot make the situation worse.
?? I may need to learn More??

p.s. I carry a twin ject just incase help is not quick enough and no I am not thrilled at the thought that I may have to use it myself but I like it better than two epi-pens

there is no right answer I guess just as long as we always have either one with us at all times

_________________
Me-Allergic to Peanut, Tree Nut, Coconut, Shellfish, ASA and Asthma
My Husband and Children No Allergies


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Aug 20, 2007 7:35 am 
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Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 9:38 pm
Posts: 1643
Location: Toronto
Hi Paige, welcome to the forum. :)

While you are correct that you don't need to be a doctor or a nurse to administer an epi-pen or twin-ject, you don't want to be reading the instructions while someone is in anaphylactic shock. It is necessary to familiarize yourself or caregiver with how to administer it. The two forms of auto-injector are similar but different enough that if you are only familiar with one, it can waste unnecessary time to figure out how to use the other at the last moment.

Also, in a normal healthy person a shot of adrenalin, if given unnecessarily, would not cause harm. However, there are a few instances -- a person with a pre-existing heart condition may not be able to handle their heart racing. That's why you should not use your own epi-pen on a person that has not had one prescribed for themselves. Also, a person having an anxiety attack -- their heart could be racing and adrenalin has the opposite effect of what is needed.

Also, I don't really this this thread is a debate. It's more a case of asking people's opinions.

_________________
self: allergy to sesame seeds and peanuts
3 sons each with at least one of the following allergies: peniciilin, sulfa-based antibiotic, latex, insect bites/stings


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Aug 20, 2007 2:37 pm 
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Joined: Wed Aug 15, 2007 1:40 am
Posts: 423
Location: Alberta, Canada
I am greatly enjoying all this information, everyones experience, what they know and what they have been through. The use of an epi pen on someone with a panic attack is not something I thought about (My mother has problems with speeding heart). Any way growing up with allergies I very much felt alone as I seemed to be the only one I knew who had to deal with this life threatening situation. Though I don't want anyone to have to deal with allergies. It is so nice to have others to talk to and to hear from. Thanks to all for your thoughts and information.

_________________
Me-Allergic to Peanut, Tree Nut, Coconut, Shellfish, ASA and Asthma
My Husband and Children No Allergies


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