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PostPosted: Tue Jun 20, 2006 1:23 pm 
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Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 9:38 pm
Posts: 1643
Location: Toronto
_Susan_ wrote:
It seems to me that the school playground monitor (teacher on duty) is there to keep the chidren safe.
I can't imagine there would be very many school age chidren who are on Epi-pen Jr's although I forget the weight that they are switched to adult Epi-pens.
So...
Why can't the monitor carry an Epi-pen?
Why can't the classroom teacher of an Anaphyaxic student carry an Epi-pen?
Additional Epi-pens could be stored in a locked unit with the other first aide suppies. (Remember when there was a school nurse?)
Time is of the essence!!
Call 911, go and check the files/photos to verify the student is alowed the Epi-pen, find the key, unlock the supply cabinet, sign out the Epi-pen, go back to the student, administer the Epi-pen...how long?


In Ontario, a teacher cannot carry an epi-pen to use on just any student. They are not qualified to make a diagnosis. We have to sign a paper giving permission for any medication - and it must be signed by a doctor as well. Not only did I have to get the doctor to sign permission for the epi-pen, but also for the benedryl even though it's an OTC.

Personally, I don't want teacher's making a decision like that. They should only be giving meds to the child that has written permission.

However, I do NOT understand why so many schools won't allow the student to carry the epi-pen. Then it's right there with the child. Not at the opposite end of the school yard with a teacher.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jun 20, 2006 8:40 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6455
Location: Ottawa
Quote:
_Susan_ wrote:
They are made to carry the inhaler but what about the areochamber?
We keep a fannypack in dd's backpack. It holds an areochamber both inhalers, Benedry, a medicine spoon, 3 Epipens, her healthcard, hospital cards, Dr.'s cards, a list of medicines she is allergic to, vaccination record, money for phone calls and parking, telephone numbers for dh and I, bandaides and stickers. I can't fit all of that into an Epipen case. It's my lifeline and security blanket.

Susan -- just wondering what you ended up doing for your daughter's inhaler and aerochamber while she's at school? Does she have the epi-belt and fanny pack on her person at school? (Seems like a lot around a tiny waist??) Or did you come up with something different?


She wears an EpiPen belt with a singe EpiPen in it. She has her backpack which contains the fannypack with 1 EpiPen, aerochamber, control and rescue puffers, her healthcard, hospital cards, Dr.'s cards, a list of medicines she is allergic to, vaccination record, money for phone calls and parking, telephone numbers for dh and I, bandaides and stickers.

The school office has an EpiPen, her Benedryl and a measuring spoon. She has medication release forms for the EpiPen and the Benedryl. Next year I will only give them the EpiPen for the office. I don't trust them to figure out when to give the EpiPen and when to give the Benedryl.

Her bigges prblem now is that she wants to wear the belt and her pants low, a la Britney Spears :roll: . We try to get onger t-shirst as the belt is uncomfortable on bare skin. :oops: ...4 1/2 going on 141/2

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Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jun 20, 2006 9:08 pm 
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Joined: Sat Apr 16, 2005 12:09 am
Posts: 1054
So Susan, does the fanny pack and back pack stay in her classroom when she's out for recess or in another part of the school? Does it stay with the teacher's desk (for her to monitor) or in her own cubby?
Quote:
Her bigges prblem now is that she wants to wear the belt and her pants low, a la Britney Spears.

All I can say is, thank goodness I have a son! :lol:


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 20, 2006 9:57 pm 
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Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 9:38 pm
Posts: 1643
Location: Toronto
ethansmom wrote:
All I can say is, thank goodness I have a son! :lol:


You say that now! Just wait until he comes home wearing baggy pants, boxers hanging out the top, shirt inside out. :roll: My son thinks he's Eminem.


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 20, 2006 10:01 pm 
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Joined: Sat Apr 16, 2005 12:09 am
Posts: 1054
UGH!! Thanks AnnaMarie -- I think 20 more grey hairs just sprouted!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jun 20, 2006 10:04 pm 
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Joined: Fri Jan 06, 2006 8:22 pm
Posts: 154
Location: Georgia
_Susan_ wrote:
Quote:
_Susan_ wrote:
The school office has an EpiPen, her Benedryl and a measuring spoon. She has medication release forms for the EpiPen and the Benedryl. Next year I will only give them the EpiPen for the office. I don't trust them to figure out when to give the EpiPen and when to give the Benedryl.

Her bigges prblem now is that she wants to wear the belt and her pants low, a la Britney Spears :roll: . We try to get onger t-shirst as the belt is uncomfortable on bare skin. :oops: ...4 1/2 going on 141/2


Susan,
See the chart in resources listed as Anaphylaxis chart. My hubby :) shrunk & laminated a copy for me to keep in my purse. It cleared up a lot of questions, especially since I don't get hives (with GI reactions it's sometimes difficult to tell how the reaction is progressing).
If you had this, the school wouldn't have to *guess*. And they could still use Benadryl for minor reactions. I consider the Epi to be the 1st line of defense, and the Benadryl stops the rest of the histamine already in the body.

Sounds like your daughter is well-prepared.

Oh, and mine is 9 going on 19. Some of the clothing in the kids dept is really trashy. But then again, I'm still the one holding the checkbook. 8)

Take care,
Daisy


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jun 20, 2006 10:54 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
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Location: Ottawa
Ethansmom-As far as I am aware, the backpack is kept in her cubby. The JK/Sk use a different playground than the others and it is right outside their classroom.

Daisy-I'll look at the chart. Thanks!

Re: clothes

I've told her that she can't shoe her belly button at schoo or she'l be sent to the Principals office. Low pants = long shirts!

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Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 28, 2006 7:54 pm 
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Joined: Sun Mar 26, 2006 5:15 pm
Posts: 20
Location: Central Alberta, Canada
Hi!
I found out about a new epipen carrier for children ages pre K to grade five. The website is www.epipuppy.com it is only $20, and it is this cute little puppy. Check it out!! 8)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Aug 28, 2006 8:40 pm 
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Joined: Sun Mar 05, 2006 1:05 pm
Posts: 528
Location: Burlington, Ontario
It's adorable and it's Canadian!

_________________
15 year old - asthmatic, allergic to cats, dogs, horses, waiting to be "officially" diagnosed for anaphylaxis
12 year old - asthmatic, allergic to tree pollen and mold, OAS
Husband - Allergic to amoxycillin
Self - Allergic to housework only


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Aug 28, 2006 9:32 pm 
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Joined: Fri Jul 21, 2006 2:43 am
Posts: 10
Hello

My dd was recently prescribed and epi-pen Jr.. she is almost 3 yrs.. and is small for her age.. She weighs under 25 lbs approx.. and is already in a type of protect tube, is that the protective case that you are talking about??
Do you think that any of these carrying cases would be able to fit around her waist?she is in 12-18 month clothing....

She is starting pre-school and I am looking for something that she wither can carry or the teacher..

_________________
Sherry
mum of 4
b-healty
c-healthy
m-enviro allergies
a-milk, wheat, raspberries, blueberries, strawberries, blackberries, enviromental, epi-pen for wasp
possiable soy.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Aug 28, 2006 9:34 pm 
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Joined: Wed Aug 10, 2005 11:21 am
Posts: 684
Location: Cobourg, ON
My husband and I are trying to decide on what to buy for our daughter to carry her own epipen now. She will be in Sk this year and in day care some days also. The puppy carrier looks really big and bulky for her. It is cute though. My dd is very fashion conscious even though she is 5!!! (I can't wait until the teen years...) So... we want something safe, somewhat discreet and durable. We are thinking of buying both an ebelt and an kozy - epi pouch ( www.kozyepi.com ), the cute one with pink flowers. She could wear the pink one on special occasions or when she has a dress on. It is big enough for an epipen in a protect tube. I am not sure what is best. Maybe we should just buy the ebelt and not give her a choice. Has anyone else bought this product?

_________________
11 year old daughter -- lives with life-threatening allergies to milk, eggs and peanuts; seasonal allergies (birch, maple, ragweed); pet allergies; asthma; and eczema
9 year old son - no allergies


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Aug 28, 2006 11:23 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
mumof3girls1boy wrote:
already in a type of protect tube, is that the protective case that you are talking about??


The EpiPen used to come in a really useless soft tube, so people had to buy things like the ProtecTube ( http://www.allstarsalesltd.com/content/ ... ation.html ) to keep it safe. Now, thank goodness, the redesigned plastic tube that the EpiPen comes in does the job. So if you're relatively new to EpiPens you likely wouldn't have seen the old flimsy tube.

As for size... my kids are pretty skinny and are fine wearing the EBelt ( http://www.ebelt.ca/products.asp ), but it's black leather and I know a lot of parents of little girls aren't taken with it. It's great for boys though.

I like Kate's idea of having an "everyday" EBelt and a fancy one. The EBelts are really well made, and Canadian. You might get a better price from Anaphylaxis Canada.

K.

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Aug 29, 2006 3:40 pm 
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Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 9:38 pm
Posts: 1643
Location: Toronto
Kate, my son started wearing the e-belt in jk. I was so pleased with it that when he outgrew it, I bought the next size up. I wouldn't consider switching to anything else for him as a child.

Regarding the epi-puppy, while it is cute, it looks a bit bulky, and will it offer protection when a child runs into the playscape? I want something that will not break no matter how much weight/force goes against it.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Aug 29, 2006 7:47 pm 
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Joined: Wed Aug 10, 2005 11:21 am
Posts: 684
Location: Cobourg, ON
So today we went into the daycare where my daughter will start in about a month and checked it out. In the last week we went through child care panic when our nanny announced that she was moving out east in 2 months. It was very unexpected because I had secured plans with her in the spring for the coming school year and had taken a new position with different hours also. It was wonderful because having her allowed our daughter to be cared for in her own allergen safe home. Anyways we lucked out because the Y daycare very close to home and work can accommodate them.

Now here is the shocking thing we discovered today. When we were talking about our daughter wearing her epipen, the supervisor said that they keep the epipens locked up. I was so surprised because schools have finally gotten over this issue. She explained that the key is kept beside the cupboard and the cupboard is in the room where the children are. The epipens are taken outside when they go out. I asked if they were aware of the new document, Anaphylaxis in Schools and Other Settings. She said that she wasn't but maybe her supervisor was. I am still not comfortable with this arrangement and will have to pursue this further. What happens at other daycares? Daycare is new to us. My daughter will only be going to daycare 2 or 3 afternoons a week after lunch and we will provide her afternoon snack.

_________________
11 year old daughter -- lives with life-threatening allergies to milk, eggs and peanuts; seasonal allergies (birch, maple, ragweed); pet allergies; asthma; and eczema
9 year old son - no allergies


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Aug 29, 2006 8:08 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
At my son's daycare they had the kids wear the EpiPens, in the end.

They went through a bit of back-and-forth at the start -- when he was 3 they asked us to have him wear it. I thought he was a bit young but said okay, and it was fine. When he was 4 they changed their minds (had been advised that young children probably shouldn't wear their EpiPens) so had the teachers wear it in a fanny pack.

Later that year they changed their minds again - they were worried that it would get forgotten if one teacher replaced another - and went back to the policy of having the kids wear it, which I actually preferred.

They were quite accomodating too - one mom always wanted her daughter to wear it, even during the "no-kid-carrying-EpiPen" phase and they said okay. And I'm sure now that if the parents of a young child said their child was too young to wear one, they'd work around that.

But they have never locked them up, and I think it's a very bad idea to lock them up - and obviously not recommended by the new guidelines. What if the key somehow goes missing? I was fine with my son wearing it even at age 3, but I realize parents will have different feelings about this.

I would not actually send my child to a place that locked up the auto-injectors, to be honest. I couldn't cope with that stress. And for me it shows a lack of allergy awareness if they are not willing to negotiate with you on this.

K.

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


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