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PostPosted: Sun Jun 10, 2007 6:20 pm 
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Joined: Sat Sep 16, 2006 6:50 pm
Posts: 205
Location: Ontario, Canada
We have a bag like that too. I set it up after her first hospital trip. I also keep a copy of her health card, phone numbers and cash for parking in there. Unfortunately I forgot to take it with us this past week.

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daughter: 6 years tree nuts, peanuts


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 10, 2007 6:27 pm 
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Joined: Thu Aug 24, 2006 1:42 am
Posts: 222
Location: Victoria, British Columbia
Gem - I am glad to hear your daughter is doing fine. It really sounds like you handled the emergency very well in a scary situation. I would be very proud of that! As a parent who has never had to administer the EpiPen, I often wonder how I react. I hope to be as strong as you.
Thank you for sharing your experience,
Hugs to you and your little girl,
Caroline

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son anaphylactic to peanuts


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 11, 2007 10:36 am 
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Joined: Sat Sep 16, 2006 6:50 pm
Posts: 205
Location: Ontario, Canada
Administering the Epi ( Twinject , in our case) was not nearly as bad as I thought. The needle is very fine and did not seem to cause much pain. I hope this can reassure some people.

One thing to note. I almost bent back my Twinject needle after use. Luckily I did not because it is the same needle used for the second dose. I found this out at the hospital when the nurse bent it back. No one at the hospital was familiar with Twinject.

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daughter: 6 years tree nuts, peanuts


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 17, 2007 8:31 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2005 6:39 pm
Posts: 2943
Location: Toronto
Gem,

Just wanted to say that I'm so glad your little girl is ok. It's such a traumatic experience for all but, as others have said, you do come away more knowledgeable.

Good on you for acting quickly with the epinephrine.

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Allergic to soy, peanut, shellfish, penicillin


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 18, 2007 3:49 pm 
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Joined: Wed May 31, 2006 12:18 am
Posts: 45
Location: Edmonton
_Susan_ wrote:
Always give the EpiPen/Twinject first and then call 911 (I too would be tempted to drive if so close, maybe mention this to the 911 operator?)
If you have the child in a carseat and are trying to give the autoinjector it can take precious time to get her out.
You are not your normal self, you could have an accident and that woud delay even more.


I recently took a first aid course with my dad and we were taught to call 9-1-1 if you think that the person might become unresponsive (which is definitely true with anaphylaxis). At the end of the course, I asked our instructor specifically what he would suggest for us. We live less than 5 minutes away from the hospital, and my parents and i have always driven over calling an ambulance (i don't even think the thaught crossed our mind). The instructor told us this: Why would you take the precaution with a stranger and call an ambulance and yet risk driven a loved one to the hospital. My dad admitted the thought had crossed his mind in the pass that we could get into an accident. And it's not even you getting into an accident you have to worry about. What if there is an accident on the road or construction and it takes twice as long to get to the hospital - that would make it 10 minutes and by that time you'd probably need another epi. We also discovered this when i reacted to an allergy shot at my doctors office last June. My doctor called an ambulance as a precaution and also because he was worried for my dad having to drive me. Even the paramedics thought it unnecessary. However, once i sat up and got into the ambulance, my BP plummeted (like 90/60 when i'm usually 115/75) and they needed to start a saline IV to bringg it up. THey also needed to put me on a mask with ventolin. I probably would have ;ost consciousness in the car with my dad!

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Anaphylaxis to fish, nut, peanuts, soy, birch, and grass.
OAS


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 18, 2007 9:54 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6455
Location: Ottawa
At our Para-medics tour, we were told that the paramedic can hook you up with a heart/BP/O2 Sat monitor and feed the info directly into the hospital. You are being treated by trained medical personell from the start and they have many devices and medications at their disposal to stabalize and treat while en route.
Why wait until you get to the hospital?
(This is Ontario Para-medics, each province is slighty different. Check with your health department to see what is available where you live/visit)

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Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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