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PostPosted: Mon Oct 29, 2007 12:49 pm 
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Joined: Fri Sep 21, 2007 3:03 pm
Posts: 180
Location: Montreal, QC
Since my little one is allergic to a few things we enjoy, we've decided to have them in the house (like regular pasta and bread), and show her that she cannot eat everything she sees. That said, I was wondering when it comes to cooking, washing dishes, and the dishwasher. Should I use a different set of dishes, pots and pans to serve and cook the "allergenic" foods? Once it's thoroughly washed by hand in hot soapy water, or in the dishwasher, are those plates safe? Or am I making my little girl live in a "may contain" house?

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Me - Kim - No allergies
DH Ben - 31 - Allergic to nuts and peanuts, lots of environmental allergies.
DD Anne - 4 - Asthma. Allergic to dairy, eggs, mustard, kiwi, peanuts, wheat and barley... for now...
DS Francois - 1 - No allergies so far...


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 29, 2007 6:39 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 6:53 pm
Posts: 1454
Location: Canada
Good questions! When I was growing up, we didn't bother having separate utensils, pans, etc. My parents did eat peanut butter on occasion when I was a kid, and for birthday cakes and things, my mom would sometimes use egg . . . I never reacted to cross contamination as far as I can tell. Of course, that doesn't mean that it couldn't be a problem--it is just something that never crossed my mind. (When I was in highschool, though, my parents all but stopped eating eggs and our house became a nut-free zone. There was still soy for me to contend with, however. Not to mention some egg-containing products like mayonnaise.)

I look at things differently now. After I tested positive for celiac, my GI doctor sent me to a dietician who gave detailed instructions for avoiding gluten contamination in the kitchen---I would suppose these guidelines could be applied to dealing with allergies as well.

Among the recommendations/suggestions:

***** a separate gluten-free counter
* **** separate cutting boards for gluten-free and gluten-filled foods because gluten can get stuck in the cracks of the wood or in the scratches on the plastic
*****gluten-free non-stick pans (teflon can harbour bits of gluten)
*****separate wooden utensils

I, personally, have my own dishcloth as well.

But I use the same glass dishes/glasses/plates/bowls, cutlery, etc.as everyone else so long as they have been run through the dishwasher. I tend not to put my cutlery on the table in case crumbs haven't been wiped off well enough (they generally are.)

I wash my own pots and pans separately myself with my gluten-free discloth.

I've asked family members to wash their hands after handling gluten-filled foods.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 29, 2007 8:46 pm 
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Joined: Sun Oct 08, 2006 10:53 am
Posts: 207
Location: Winnipeg, MB
We use the same plates,cups & cutlery and run them through the dishwasher. However, if we do have something with egg in it, we scrub those very well first before loading them in the dishwasher as I find with egg it almost gets cooked on if not rinsed well first. We don't eat anything with peanuts or tree nuts in the house.

The only thing we have kept separate is our plastics. When our son was young we had "green for go" dishes. Everything that was safe for him was put into plastic containers with Green Lids. Anything that he was allergic to went into other containers (like sour cream containers, cottage cheese, margarine tubs, etc.) That way he knew he could eat whatever was in the "green" containers.

His first (and only) reaction to peanuts was from what we thought was a regular reussable plastic container that we put safe food into. Turns out it was an old peanut butter container and he had a reaction to the pasta we put into it. We didn't even know he had a peanut allergy at that time so didn't really take note of the container. Ever since then, I'm leary of plastics which is why we put this plan into place. It's worked for us.

I can understand the Gluten precautions that Helen has described as my SIL has Celiac and I have separate dishes, pots & measuring tools (and pantry) for her as I do alot of baking for the family. I don't know if you need to use the same precausions with a wheat allergy as you do gluten but if so, what Helen has suggested is right on the money. The only thing I don't agree with is the wooden utensils. I use only stainless for my SIL as they are easier to sterilize.

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adult son allergic to peanuts, most tree nuts, eggs and penicillin.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 12, 2007 8:04 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 6:53 pm
Posts: 1454
Location: Canada
mharasym wrote:
His first (and only) reaction to peanuts was from what we thought was a regular reussable plastic container that we put safe food into. Turns out it was an old peanut butter container and he had a reaction to the pasta we put into it. We didn't even know he had a peanut allergy at that time so didn't really take note of the container. Ever since then, I'm leary of plastics which is why we put this plan into place. It's worked for us.

I can understand the Gluten precautions that Helen has described as my SIL has Celiac and I have separate dishes, pots & measuring tools (and pantry) for her as I do alot of baking for the family. I don't know if you need to use the same precausions with a wheat allergy as you do gluten but if so, what Helen has suggested is right on the money. The only thing I don't agree with is the wooden utensils. I use only stainless for my SIL as they are easier to sterilize.


That's interesting about the reaction to residue on the plastic jar---it does seem that some potential methods of cross-contamination which the celiac community is aware of aren't really on the radar of the allergic community. (I got specific, detailed instructions re: x-contamination from my dietician. Nothing comparable (or even remotely close) re: handling life-threatening allergies.)

Thanks for the confirmation re: the gluten cross-contamination. People who sometimes "get" the need to avoid peanuts like the plague (seeing as they can actually kill me) think I'm a bit paranoid with gluten-avoidance (seeing as it won't . . .unless I continue eating gluten and get cancer or something.)

My allergist didn't think that I needed to be so cautious about my wheat allergy (before I knew about the celiac)---I knew that oats were bothering me, and I asked him if it could be because of cross contamination with wheat and he said it was unlikely. (His answer might have been different if I had had anaphylactic reactions to wheat.) But no doctor would tell anyone with celiac that cross contaminated oats are okay.


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