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 Post subject: Any thoughts?
PostPosted: Sun Jun 08, 2008 9:28 am 
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Joined: Sat Sep 16, 2006 6:50 pm
Posts: 205
Location: Ontario, Canada
I am taking an additional qualifications course at an Ontario university to update my teaching credentials. The course is Special Education 1 and in the text( Inclusion of Exceptional Learners in Canadian Schools by Nancy L. Hutchinson), they list allergies and asthma as a special education exceptionality . I have been thinking about the implications of this in regards to the rights for allergic students in schools compared to the rights students with other exceptionalities are receiving in schools.

Any thoughts?

_________________
daughter: 6 years tree nuts, peanuts


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jun 08, 2008 1:41 pm 
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Joined: Wed Aug 10, 2005 11:21 am
Posts: 688
Location: Cobourg, ON
I am not sure what you are implying. In general, special education services are on the decline in most school boards in Ontario. EA time is limited and special education programs are being cut. Many children even with high academic special needs are not really receiving what they should be. There has always been a category for medical conditions in the IPRC process. In Ontario, there is probably more support for our children which will come out of Sabrina's law than by having your child designated as exceptional at an IPRC meeting. For people who are not teachers, at an IPRC (identification, placement and review committee) meeting, a child with special needs is identified, a special program is created and each year after the identification the program is reviewed.

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13 year old daughter -- lives with life-threatening allergies to milk, tree nuts and peanuts; seasonal allergies (birch, maple, ragweed); pet allergies; asthma; and eczema
10 year old son - no allergies


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jun 08, 2008 2:50 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6502
Location: Ottawa
I don't know if children with food allergies are exceptional learners. I'm afraid I don't understand the term.

If you mean that our children require additional resources because of a medical disability, then yes, they require a safe environment and that may mean additional time for the entire class to wash hands before and after eating. Additional custodial attention in cleaning the classroom and concideration in purchasing cleaning supplies. Additional supervision of meals or on class trips. Extra time being spent on an administrative level to create policies, disseminateinformation and train staff.

If you mean that their condition needs to be concidered when planning lessons, then yes, applications to real life are often the basisof lesson plans but art classs that include egg based paints, crafts involving foods, science experiments involving foods, mathematics in lower grade which use candies for sequencing all require some forethought as to what the ingredients are and whether or not they expose a student to a risk.

I have no proof, but I suspect food allergies affects a cross section of society in terms of intellegence. I do think that our children are under more stress than the other students and this can impact learning. On the other hand, our children are often further ahead of the rest of the class in terms of postponing gratification, problem solving, planning and analysing situations with possible outcomes. They practice these skills on a daily basis.

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Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jun 08, 2008 3:09 pm 
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Joined: Sat Sep 16, 2006 6:50 pm
Posts: 205
Location: Ontario, Canada
I should clarify that I am not implying anything, I am just reflecting. :) The author is suggesting is that children with LTA need special considerations as do children with diabetes , for example. I was just reflecting on how some of us on this forum seem to have quite a battle to receive these considerations and perhaps having the students labeled exceptional ( meaning they need special considerations - gifted students are also exceptional /special education students) would help.

Hope I didn't kick up a hornets nest :)

_________________
daughter: 6 years tree nuts, peanuts


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jun 08, 2008 9:11 pm 
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Joined: Wed Aug 10, 2005 11:21 am
Posts: 688
Location: Cobourg, ON
Oh no don't worry Gem, I just wasn't clear what you were thinking. In the absense of Sabrina's law, having an allergic child designated exceptional because of their medical condition might be the way to guarantee support - you're right.

_________________
13 year old daughter -- lives with life-threatening allergies to milk, tree nuts and peanuts; seasonal allergies (birch, maple, ragweed); pet allergies; asthma; and eczema
10 year old son - no allergies


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jun 17, 2008 1:24 am 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 6:53 pm
Posts: 1454
Location: Canada
I think this knowledge could be very useful for parents with children with allergies and asthma. I'm not clear on the extent to which under Sabrina's Law each allergic child would have an individualized allergy plan (I'm not up on Sabrina's Law), but I can sure see how this could help children with uncontrolled asthma who, say, can't fully participate in gym class.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jun 17, 2008 6:47 am 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6502
Location: Ottawa
Before our daughter started school 3 years ago, I was speaking to her aunt who lives in Alberta and is a school teacher.

She was concerned about how to keep a child safe (there was not policy in her school atthat time). She worried about lesson plans and meal times. She felt that having an EA would be necessary to ensure adequate supervision.

Without a specific policy on how to manage the students condition and without training for all staff on how to deal with an anaphylaxis reaction, I think having an advocate with the child who is trained would be a good thing especially in the lower grades. I don't think it would be good after grade 3-4 as it would set the child apart from their peers too much. I also think it removes the responsibility from the school and it is up to the school to develop plans and policies to ensure the safety of all students.

_________________
Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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