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PostPosted: Sat Sep 06, 2008 10:56 pm 
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Joined: Fri Dec 22, 2006 12:52 am
Posts: 214
We had first aid training at school yesterday (I am a teacher). The organization running it was called Link to Life, and the trainer was very good. She was also anaphylactic to bee stings and took the allergy section of the class very seriously. A few interesting things happened:

1) We had to do a lot of buddy stuff where one of us played the victim and one of us played the resucer. After the first such thing, I off-handedly remarked to the trainer that my 'rescuer' missed my medic-alert bracelet. She then commented on this to the group, who all looked sheepish. I played the 'victim' at least six more times over the course of the day (including once as a demo victim for the trainer herself) and not once did anybody notice or look at the bracelet :)

2) When she found out the bracelet mentioned that I carry an epi-pen, everyone immediately asked me where it was and why I carried it. When my answer was 'it's in my bag, in the classroom' everyone went 'ooooh!' But I remarked to the trainer that I had not eaten, there as no food in the room and I was not allergic to anything airborne. She said I should still have it handy, but it's not a big deal in a case like this given my history to have it in front of me at every moment. But she did say that this comes up in every single training she does---there will turn out to be someone with an epi-pen, and they will sheepishly admit that it isn't with them right now :)

3) I remarked afterward to a friend of mine that I found the whole dialogue about my epi-pen a little embarrassing. She said not to worry about it, that a lot of people carry them and she herself is anaphylactic to wasp stings. I asked where HER epi-pen was and she whipped it out of her pocket right there! I had no idea. I wish she had spoken up about it in the training so I wouldn't have felt so singled out.

4) As far as allergy plans for kids, the trainer emphasized that our plan should be 'work out a plan with the parents and do what they say.' Some kids (such as her own, who shares the bee allergy) need the epi-pen followed by oral medication. Another teacher mentioned that her child's school has a phone tree for every child---so, for example, if you are first on the phone tree, they will call you before they call 911. If the parent wants the first thing the school does to be 'call 911' then that needs to be specified. So basically, the plan should be 'set up an emergency checklist with the parent then follow that in case of a reaction.' This seemed to me to be a very sensible way to train teachers on the topic.

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Asthma and eczema
Drug allergy (succinylcholine)
Food (corn, raw apples, green beans, tree nuts, flax)
Misc (pollen, grass, mold, dogs, cats)


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 07, 2008 6:51 am 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
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Location: Ottawa
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I remarked afterward to a friend of mine that I found the whole dialogue about my epi-pen a little embarrassing. She said not to worry about it, that a lot of people carry them and she herself is anaphylactic ... I had no idea. I wish she had spoken up about it in the training so I wouldn't have felt so singled out.


I would have been annoyed with the trainer lumping me in with the allergy deniers too, if I were you. Usually after a training session we are given a feed back form. I would have addressed this and offered that it was more the job of the trainer to reinforce to the class to searchfor all symptoms and/or evidence of health conditions than to chastise you for not carrying your Epi-Pen on your person. (To have missed the bracelete was a huge mistake-what if the person had angina? Reading the bracelete would have instructed them to give the medication ASAP)

You had your Epi-Pen in your bag, in the classroom, you're doing well. We try to keep it on the same floor as our daughter but we don't ask her to sleep with an E-belt nor does she swim or bathe with it on her body.

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Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 11, 2008 12:07 pm 
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Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 9:38 pm
Posts: 1643
Location: Toronto
Actually, pointing out someone not having their epi with them is good advice to teachers. While my son does not carry his belt around at home, it is always hanging in one spot and every adult there knows where it is. That's not the case in a school. If you needed it, how long before someone who knows where it is would be there? Plus, a school is a lot bigger then my little home. :lol:

(I think I'll go hide now...)

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self: allergy to sesame seeds and peanuts
3 sons each with at least one of the following allergies: peniciilin, sulfa-based antibiotic, latex, insect bites/stings


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