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PostPosted: Wed Jul 06, 2005 9:01 am 
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Joined: Wed Mar 23, 2005 9:47 am
Posts: 305
Location: Montreal, Canada
For the ones who can kill a child, and up to end of high school. The most tragic experience happened to me in high school, not in elementary school although most people would probably think that it would be the other way around.


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 08, 2005 3:12 pm 
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Joined: Wed Mar 23, 2005 1:17 pm
Posts: 50
Location: Hamilton, Ontario
Youngvader, a ban won't protect you if someone wants to use your allergy against you. I agree with other writers that relating our personal stories to educate is an effective way to ease the hostile feelings. My sister's family just didn't get it and used to tease my son with shaking unopened tins of peanuts near him until my sister heard me speak at a "Mom and Me" group meeting. I told everyone, in detail, about my son's anaphylactic reaction -- from the swollen lips, vomitting, total body hives, and right up to his semi-conscious state. My sister came up to me later and said, "I had no idea it was like that!" Her family has never teased my son since and are careful to make all food peanut-free when we visit.


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 08, 2005 7:43 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 6:53 pm
Posts: 1454
Location: Canada
I agree that education is key too. If a school has an allergy plan in place, allergy-related bullying clearly won't be tolerated. Plus with greater understanding of allergies, kids are less likely to bully others (I would hope). When kids are young I believe that peanut bans are necessary. Yes, in highschool, students are probably old enough to shoulder more responsibility, but peanut bans at least in common eating areas are still a good idea in my opinion when the students in question have a contact allergy. Cases have been reported of reactions from trace peanut proteins on surfaces that have been thoroughly cleaned. (I'm getting this from that document I cited elsewhere on this site written by several Canadian allergists on recommendations for schools and school boards.)


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 11, 2005 9:27 am 
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Joined: Wed Mar 23, 2005 9:47 am
Posts: 305
Location: Montreal, Canada
shaking unopened tins of peanuts near him

That's one thing. When they try to force peanuts down your throat or spread peanut butter in your face, it's a totally different story.


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 11, 2005 11:52 am 
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Joined: Wed Mar 23, 2005 1:17 pm
Posts: 50
Location: Hamilton, Ontario
Youngvader, do you think that would not have happened if the school had a ban in place?


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 11, 2005 1:47 pm 
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Joined: Wed Mar 23, 2005 9:47 am
Posts: 305
Location: Montreal, Canada
I don't know. Maybe, maybe not. And otherwise, I think the perpetrator would have been severly punished. You need laws and we need to obey them. Otherwise, it's just a free for all.


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