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PostPosted: Wed Nov 02, 2011 2:23 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jun 22, 2011 4:26 pm
Posts: 412
Can someone please explain to me why this is? I'm not a parent, and even my parent friends can't figure this out. Perhaps someone here can provide enlightening thoughts on the matter. I get that parents want to protect their kids in every way possible, and without a better explanation, I think this goes too far.

I know two kids, not related to each other, who have EpiPens even though they have no allergies, have never had a reaction, have no family history of allergies, and don't have any other medical condition that could require one (i.e. asthma). Their parents state that they need them just in case they ever have a reaction to something. One kid has never been stung by a bee/wasp/hornet yet the parent is terrified that she will die if she is stung... yet no known allergies in the family, no history, etc. The other kid has no reason at all that I could get from the parents other than what I take as general allergy paranoia, no known allergies in that family either. Huh? Why would you do that to your kid?

I could understand if there was a suspected allergy to something (pre-diagnosis) or if there was a strong family history of reactions even, but the pieces just aren't adding up here.

_________________
anaphylaxis to tree nuts and peanuts; asthmatic, dairy intolerant, vegan
other family members allergic to to dairy, egg, peanut, peach, banana, sesame, environmentals


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 02, 2011 4:57 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6490
Location: Ottawa
Do they have an individual anaphylaxis plan?
Could they be concerned about the first reaction occuring at school? Do they wear the epipens or are they kept at the office?
You can purchase an epipen over the counter but most use a prescription because then they can get most of it reimbursed.
I would ask for clarification, as the teacher, you want to know what the issue is so that you can reduce the risk and be extra vigilant at the appropriate times.

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Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 03, 2011 1:51 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jun 22, 2011 4:26 pm
Posts: 412
I've tried to get as much information from the parents as I possibly can. The EpiPens are carried by the kids. Neither of them have anaphylaxis action plans and parents couldn't have them completed properly because they have no known allergies, reactions, or doctor notes. So they are going with the 'if they experience life-threatening symptoms, give them Epi' - which is pretty vague and makes me a little afraid, not knowing if there is something they aren't telling me or how to explain this to the child if they ever ask questions. :scratchy

These are both non-prescription EpiPens. Their parents seem to me (from the extensive quizzing I have done to them) simply afraid that their kid will develop an allergy at some time and that carrying an EpiPen could save their life. Well... yes... but that's like carrying around an AED (defribrulator) everywhere if you do not have a heart condition, just in case your heart stops... (1 in 40 people have a condition that may make this happen; 1 in 8 kids could develop food allergies, usually before school age) and that's why many schools and fitness facilities have AEDs and EpiPens, just in case something random does happen. I tried to rationalise this with them, gave them some educational material about allergies, encouraged them to see their GP to get more advice, and brig me a doctor's note with a better explanation. (Two months later... still no doctor's notes.)

After thinking this over and asking a few other people yesterday, I think all the focus on allergies, food bans, news articles, warning posters, etc. at school and in the media is making some hyper-protective parents worried that life-threatening allergies are so common that their kid will eventually develop an allergy and their first reaction will require Epi. That't not very likely, although I can see how very worrisome parents could interpret it that way. And if $100 per year buys that 'peace of mind', I can almost see where they are coming from... but still... what is this saying/doing to their kids?

Sorry if this has turned into a bit of rant. I've always been thorough when it comes to understanding things parents write on health forms as I take them very seriously. It's just like the kid whose form says she is allergic to soy yet can drink soy milk and eat tofu but not soy butter. (We're working on that one... she's going to get tested.) I don't like conflicting and/or confusing information.

_________________
anaphylaxis to tree nuts and peanuts; asthmatic, dairy intolerant, vegan
other family members allergic to to dairy, egg, peanut, peach, banana, sesame, environmentals


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 04, 2011 12:12 am 
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Joined: Tue Jun 26, 2007 2:45 pm
Posts: 803
Location: Vancouver, BC
I'm shocked and shaking my head over this one. I have never heard of this, and it really seems unnecessary and overly-protective. I wonder if either parent has spoken to a doctor about it. Maybe one parent decided to do it, then convinced the other parent to do the same? It seems odd that two families would both do it with no reason.

I guess if the children one day develop an allergy, then they'll be used to carrying their epipen! There are several children with severe allergies at our school, and my kids are the only ones who carry their epipens on their person.

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DD 2004 Allergy to peanuts, egg, sesame, and new: lentils and chick peas
DS 2006 Allergy to peanuts, tree nuts, milk, egg, kiwi fruit, eczema


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 04, 2011 7:40 am 
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Joined: Fri Oct 10, 2008 9:40 pm
Posts: 2034
Location: ottawa
I know of one older child who I've seen for 5 years now eat nuts/pn products but her parents call her allergic (no epi) just make a scene the odd time about food. :dungetit
And I know three small children (two are siblings) who also carry epi's - no ana reactions - got sick one day and the parents had the GP prescribe epi's. That I don't have a problem with as it could take ages to see an allergist and they need med. (epi) in case they are in fact allergic. But for these parents to advertise to everyone their kids have allergies...then wonder why I'm not on the 'same page' as them regarding food/other issues is infuriating. It makes me look over reactive and unreasonable and that they are the rational allergy parents.
It would be different if they all said, we are awaiting confirmation etc..,but to deem their kids allergic yet they eat things I know are not safe...safely....just makes my blood pressure go up as it directly affect how people view ds and what should be safe for him in this situation.

:banghead

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DD 12 yrs -no allergies
4 yr old DS - asthma/eczema Anaphylactic to Peanuts, all tree nuts, sesame , all pea/lentil legumes, gelatin.
Allergic to trees, grass,ragweed, feathers, dander, mold and dust.
Outgrew eggs, fish, shellfish


Last edited by BC2007 on Fri Nov 04, 2011 3:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Fri Nov 04, 2011 3:30 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jun 22, 2011 4:26 pm
Posts: 412
Thanks everyone. I am relieved that I am not the only person here who hasn't heard of this before and cannot make sense of it. I agree with BC that it can send the wrong message to others about people who actually have allergies. Another item to add to the 'weird and unexplainable' list.

_________________
anaphylaxis to tree nuts and peanuts; asthmatic, dairy intolerant, vegan
other family members allergic to to dairy, egg, peanut, peach, banana, sesame, environmentals


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 23, 2011 1:59 am 
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Joined: Wed Dec 01, 2010 12:49 am
Posts: 122
Location: USA
I've read this, and hypochondriac comes to mind. I think this would fall under a DSM-VI category, but don't quote me on this as my book is lost after many moves.

_________________
Asthma, SHF, GF, EF, Allergic: Meat, Poultry, Laurel, Mustard, Gras, Mallow, Plantain, Flacourtia, Pine family; ETOH, Vinegars, CremeTartar, Cucumbrs, Fenugrk, Most of Lily, Myrtle, Parsley, Nightshade, Composite familys. Pomgrante, Litchi, Starfrt


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 23, 2011 6:48 am 
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Joined: Wed Jun 17, 2009 9:23 pm
Posts: 129
BC2007 wrote:
It makes me look over reactive and unreasonable and that they are the rational allergy parents.


Ohhhh I know all about that! We were out with my brother and his kids. My son refused some chips as they were cooked in sunflower oil (he gets facial swelling from just the oil and anaphylaxis with the seed). I heard a lady we were with ask my brother if J was allergic to something and he said yes sunflower oil. The lady then went on to say how her grandson had a peanut allergy to which my brother said 'yes, we know all about that our son has a peanut allergy' and then went on to say how it didnt impact on their lives too much and that they just needed to be careful about reading labels . (which they read once then consider them good for life!)

BUT he forgot to mention that his son gets a RASH from exposure to peanut-is not considered to be at risk of anaphylaxis....and that MY son has had anaphylaxis to sunflower, peanut, barley, pineapple and is highly sensitised to tree nuts. It made me feel like my son was making a big deal about refusing the chips as it was 'only' a sunflower allergy. GRRRR

_________________
twin boys-
c-eosinophilic oesophagitis
j-avoids peanut, sunflower, pineapple all ana-sensitised to maccadaemia.pecan.Passed barley (previous ana) last year...out grew egg ana and peanut at 3 years..became re sensitised with ana at 6 years to peanut.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 24, 2011 10:03 pm 
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Joined: Sun Nov 30, 2008 11:00 am
Posts: 1119
The anxiety that those parents would be causing for those kids is unfortunate. If you are far from medical help then I could understand having one as a precaution but to carry it around is just odd. I think the DSM-IV reference is on to something...

I now have to carry an epi-pen pending allergy tests in a few months and although I have often carried it for my daughter I truly didn't realize what a pain it is to always have it!

Sad that the reverse happens as well where a student has a diagnosed medical condition but will not carry meds or provide the paperwork so that the school can better help them.

_________________
me: allergic to crustaceans plus environmental
teenager: allergic to hazelnuts, some other foods and environmental


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