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PostPosted: Wed Jun 14, 2006 6:11 pm 
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http://www.prnewswire.co.uk/cgi/news/release?id=173308


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 14, 2006 6:38 pm 
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Also from this conference - a startling story about fatal attacks/mild asthma, as well as info about Euro parents' not controlling their children's asthma:

http://www.forbes.com/technology/ebusin ... 15457.html


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 15, 2006 8:24 am 
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Location: Burlington, Ontario
[quoteTherefore, food allergy sufferers should always carry an emergency kit containing an antihistamine, epinephrine and a cortisone product.][/quote]

I asked the intern at our doctor's office about the need to carry an antihistamine and he said it was not necessary, that it wouldn't hep that much. The ER doctor when my daughter had her reaction told us that we should have given her some Benadryl, that it would definitely have helped. Who do I believe? What does everybody else do? Do you carry Benadryl? And in what form, liquid or pill? (I would think that the liquid would be easier to take if your throat is tightening.) What about the cortisone? This is the first time I hear about carrying cortisone as part of the emergency kit.

Quote:
Dr. G. Walter Canonica of the University of Genoa in Italy said the survey underscored how effective treatment "is a shared responsibility requiring continuous communication among physicians and children with asthma and their parents."


This is indeed very important, because even though we comply with our doctors' instructions to the letter, both my daughters' asthma is still not completely under control. It takes a lot of work and it is definitely an ongoing process. I see so many people who take Ventolin as needed but no anti-inflammatory medicine to prevent attacks. That's not management, that's crisis control only. They are not kidding when they use the word "management", it is really like managing a business. (You almost need an MBA! :lol: ). You have to take preventative measures, you have to have an action plan, you have to have an emergency plan and you definitely have to educate yourself in an ongoing manner

_________________
15 year old - asthmatic, allergic to cats, dogs, horses, waiting to be "officially" diagnosed for anaphylaxis
12 year old - asthmatic, allergic to tree pollen and mold, OAS
Husband - Allergic to amoxycillin
Self - Allergic to housework only


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 15, 2006 11:18 am 
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Joined: Thu Sep 22, 2005 11:39 pm
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Location: saskatchewan, canada
Nicole,

We carry benadryll at all times as well. There are those times that one of my daughters(usually the youngest) will come into contact with milk protein (IT IS EVERYWHERE). My allergist says benadryll for any "outside" symptoms (hives, outside swelling etc.) and epi pen fpr anything "inside".

We carry liquid since the tablets are from age 6 and up. The liquid is a bit awkward, you must also carry something to measure the dosage (measuring spoon, syringe). Tablets would be easier...not to mention smaller, and not add a lot of "bulk" to the allergy supplies she is already carrying. For each of my girls, a twin ject AND a bottle of benadryll is bulky. Perhaps, a few benadryll tablets, and dosage instructions would discretely fit in wherever she carries her epipen.

_________________
DD age 9 1/2 -peanuts, nuts,
DD age 7 1/2 - milk, eggs, chicken, peanuts, treenuts, cats, dogs,
DS age 2 1/2
Husband- asthma, eggs, treenuts, fish, shellfish environmental
Self - penicillan, eurithromiacin, mild laytex allergy.


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 15, 2006 11:50 am 
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Joined: Sun Mar 05, 2006 1:05 pm
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Location: Burlington, Ontario
Thanks, saskmommy, that advice makes sense.

I wish our allergist would have mentioned this. I don't always think of everything. I really need to bring an emergency plan at our next appt to go over those details.

_________________
15 year old - asthmatic, allergic to cats, dogs, horses, waiting to be "officially" diagnosed for anaphylaxis
12 year old - asthmatic, allergic to tree pollen and mold, OAS
Husband - Allergic to amoxycillin
Self - Allergic to housework only


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2006 3:11 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 6:53 pm
Posts: 1454
Location: Canada
I agree that it is important to carry Benadryl or an antihistamine in some form or other in case of minor reactions (i.e. through contact....not that some peoples' contact reactions can't be severe)

My allergist told me that it isn't necessary to take Benadryl if it is an epi moment. The reason: if you need to take the epipen, you also need to go to the hospital. Antihistamines take awhile to kick in, and you are going to get Benadryl at the hospital anyways. He said that it won't hurt to take Benadryl at home....but it isn't going to help a whole lot.

I'm not entirely sure if he was thinking of the pill form, though....I've heard that the liquid form is absorbed faster.

I do carry liquid Benadryl with me at all times. *But* I would only take it in an emergency situation after I took the epi and called 9-1-1.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2006 8:22 pm 
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Joined: Thu Sep 22, 2005 11:39 pm
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Location: saskatchewan, canada
Yeah, I think liquid does absorb faster than pill form. Good point Helen. In addition to pill form, there are chewable tablets, which would probably be the most convienient, since most people would need water to swallow the pill form. Chewable would probably absorb quicker than pill as well.

_________________
DD age 9 1/2 -peanuts, nuts,
DD age 7 1/2 - milk, eggs, chicken, peanuts, treenuts, cats, dogs,
DS age 2 1/2
Husband- asthma, eggs, treenuts, fish, shellfish environmental
Self - penicillan, eurithromiacin, mild laytex allergy.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2006 8:55 pm 
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Joined: Sat Mar 04, 2006 1:30 pm
Posts: 134
I am not sure where but someone had submitted a link to an article in the Journal of Pediatrics. It talked about using both an antihistamine in addition to epi. If anyone can find it it is certainly an article worth reading adn it reviews protocols for emergency treatment.
Stephanie


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2006 10:22 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
The first link has this quote: "Anaphylactic shock is fatal in approximately five percent of cases."

Is it me, or does this seem like a very high percentage? Five percent really seems like a lot to me.... Perhaps it depends on how you define anaphylactic shock? And who exactly is tracking anaphylaxis? I didn't think it was being tracked consistently, so how can they know what percentage is fatal if they don't even know how many people are experiencing anaphylactic shock every year?? I know that the people whose names are attached to the referenced study/article are very well known and respected, but I still wonder about this....

K.

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Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 19, 2006 6:45 am 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
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Location: Ottawa
Just wantd to comment on the Benedryl liquid vs pill topic:

For those with milk allergies, be suspicious of pills. They might contain lactose.

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Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 19, 2006 9:03 am 
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Joined: Sun Mar 05, 2006 1:05 pm
Posts: 528
Location: Burlington, Ontario
Karen, that percentage also doesn't reveal the circumstances surrounding each incident. Did these persons have an epi-pen, did they use it, were these people careless about their allergies, was it their first and only reaction, etc.

It doesn't make their deaths less important, but this percentage may not be as high in people who manage their allergies.

And you are right about defining anaphylactic shock. Symptoms might differ from one person to another. If a person shows GI symptoms only, do they consider this as not being full anaphylactic and therefore not count it in the percentage?

There are many factors to consider and therefore that percentage might not be extremely accurate.

_________________
15 year old - asthmatic, allergic to cats, dogs, horses, waiting to be "officially" diagnosed for anaphylaxis
12 year old - asthmatic, allergic to tree pollen and mold, OAS
Husband - Allergic to amoxycillin
Self - Allergic to housework only


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