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PostPosted: Thu Aug 10, 2006 4:00 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
If you or your allergic loved ones are planning on flying in the near future, you should be aware of these restrictions in the U.S. and likely elsewhere.

I do not know how restrictive things are for flights that remain in Canada.

---------------------------------------------------------------
**THE FOOD ALLERGY & ANAPHYLAXIS NETWORK SPECIAL FOOD ALLERGY ALERT NOTICE**

Airport Security Alert
What Allergic Passengers Need to Know
August 10, 2006

Because of heightened security measures in airports, the [U.S.] Transportation
Security Administration has announced that:

"NO LIQUIDS OR GELS OF ANY KIND WILL BE PERMITTED IN CARRY-ON BAGGAGE.
ITEMS MUST BE IN CHECKED BAGGAGE. This includes all beverages, shampoo,
suntan lotion, creams, tooth paste, hair gel, and other items of similar
consistency.

Exception: Baby formula, breast milk, or juice if a baby or small child is
traveling; prescription medicine with a name that matches the passenger's
ticket; and insulin and essential other non-prescription medicines."

Check with the Transportation Security Administration at http://www.tsa.gov
for the latest information about restricted items.

FAAN has these recommendations:

*If you carry an epinephrine auto-injector, or other prescription
medication, be sure that the pharmacy label is attached, and that the name
matches the passenger's identification. Carry a letter from your doctor
that explains the need for this medication. A sample letter is available on
the FAAN Web site at http://www.foodallergy.org/Advocacy/airlines.html

*If you carry a liquid medication, such as Benadryl®, you may encounter
close scrutiny. Before your trip you may want to ask your doctor about
possible alternatives, such as self-dissolve tablets. Be sure to check the
ingredients on any new medication. More information is available about self-
dissolve tablets on the FAAN Web site at
http://www.foodallergy.org/anaphylaxis/treatment.html

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

K.

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 10, 2006 4:08 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2005 6:39 pm
Posts: 2947
Location: Toronto
Karen, Think the change is U.S. flights only - at least for now.

Relates to the increased Homeland Security level in the U.S. following today's arrest of UK suspects plotting to blow up a US plane. Liquid explosives are reported to have been seized - which explains the clampdown on liquids on airlines.


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 10, 2006 4:09 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
Yeah - I didn't bother mentioning that since it's been splashed all over the news here! :) (No pun intended.)

K.

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 11, 2006 10:11 am 
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Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2005 6:39 pm
Posts: 2947
Location: Toronto
OK, so as most of you will have seen, heard, read, the changes do affect Canada, too.

I'm attaching the specifics from statement by the Minister of Transport. I'll try to find out from Transport whether auto-injectors specifically are exempt.

From Canada's Minister of Transport yesterday:

Quote:
The most significant changes passengers will notice, are measures to prohibit passengers carrying onboard containers of liquids or gels of any size.
This measure was put in place early this morning for flights to and from the United Kingdom and the United States.

This was followed by a measure effective 12 noon prohibiting passengers from carrying containers of any of size of liquids or gels on board any flights departing from or within Canada.

Liquids or gels prohibited on all flights in Canada will include: all beverages, shampoo, suntan lotion, creams, toothpaste, hair gel and other items of similar consistency.

Passengers may bring on board baby formula, breast milk or juice if a baby or small child is travelling with the passenger.

Prescription medicine with a name that matches the passenger’s ticket, insulin and essential other non-prescription medicines will be allowed.

These measures will be kept in place as long as it is necessary to protect the safety of all Canadians.


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 11, 2006 2:16 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2005 6:39 pm
Posts: 2947
Location: Toronto
Allergic Living has checked with Transport Canada about EpiPens specifically, since they aren't pills but rather a liquid injection device. Here's what Communications Manager Nicole McNeilly had to say

"EpiPens are still allowed onboard as a prescription medication. There shoud be a name on the device that matches the name on the passenger's ticket." She compared it to insulin for diabetics, which is also still allowed.

She added: "We advise that the prescription label be visible and that you get an official note from your doctor" stating that the medication is required and that the person has severe allergies. (See info in Karen's note from FAAN above.)

Hope that helps.


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 13, 2006 3:44 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2005 6:39 pm
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Location: Toronto
Travel on flights originating in the UK, however, is more restrictive.

As this Belfast story suggests, long flights out of Britain, Ireland or Scotland will create problems for those with diet concerns: http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/ ... ory=702165


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 13, 2006 11:03 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 6:53 pm
Posts: 1454
Location: Canada
I hope that allergy groups do some serious advocacy in this area. Airline food is just not safe. And multiple food allergies just blow their computer systems. My sister once managed to get a nut free meal but was served fish which is one of her allergies. She now no longer bothers trying to get a special meal, but she has had difficulty on a number of occasions. Once I think the meal just didn't make its way on board. That isn't to mention cross contamination issues which I don't think airlines get.

I can understand the need for restrictions, but I would hope that we could persuade airlines that a doctor's note + the willingness to taste one's food would be enough. It just isn't fair to expect people to starve. I personally could not go for 24 hours without food. Don't even think I'd make it for 8. And what if people are hypoglycemic on top of being allergic? Or what about people with diabetis + allergies?


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 14, 2006 1:58 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
I agree - I cannot imagine an airline being able to provide a meal that is guaranteed to be free of dairy, eggs, peanuts and nuts (for example).

I really don't see our family flying in the near (or perhaps medium) future, to be honest.

I really feel for those people who have no choice but to fly, or who already have vacations booked.

K.

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 14, 2006 8:23 pm 
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Joined: Wed May 31, 2006 12:18 am
Posts: 45
Location: Edmonton
Thanks Gwen for the info from Transport Canada! I would have never thought of having a note, all that is said in the news is to make sure it's the same name on the label as the passenger!
As for the food issue, I always bring my own snacks on board and almost always travel with WestJet which frequently serves Oreos, which i can eat. But i always check the ingredients. The longest flight i ever took was with Air Canada from Edmonton to LA and I called ahead of time and was told that they could not make any guarantees so i brought some snacks and my friends split my lunch between them. I don't know what I would do if i had to fly overseas (which i intend to do one day)!
Unfortunately, i don't have the option to stop flying, my sister lives in Vancouver and we frequently fly back and forth. My parents and I have already booked our flight for Christmas. The security measures are annoying, but if they'll make flying safer, i'm all for it. As a side note, yesterday i was helping my sister pack for her flight home and we argued about whether a cream blush and lip gloss would be considered liquids, she put them in her checked luggage to be safe. I know that mascara is considered a liquid, so I'm assuming that lip gloss/stick and cream would be too?

Caroline

_________________
Anaphylaxis to fish, nut, peanuts, soy, birch, and grass.
OAS


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