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PostPosted: Mon Jan 22, 2007 11:58 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
Health-Related Quality Of Life In Food Hypersensitive Schoolchildren And Their Families: Parents' Perceptions
Marklund B; Ahlstedt S; Nordström G

Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2006; ©2006 BioMed Central, Ltd.
Posted 01/09/2007

NB: HRQL = Health-Related Quality Of Life

Quote:
Results: An important predictor of low HRQL was allergic disease (i.e. asthma, eczema, rhino conjunctivitis) in addition to food hypersensitivity. The higher the number of allergic diseases, the lower the physical HRQL for the child, the lower the parental HRQL and the more disruption in family activities.


Quote:
Conclusion: The variance in the child's physical HRQL was to a considerable extent explained by the presence of allergic disease. However, food hypersensitivity by itself was associated with deterioration of child's psychosocial HRQL, regardless of additional allergic disease. The results suggest that it is rather the risk of food reactions and measures to avoid them that are associated with lower HRQL than the clinical reactivity induced by food intake. Therefore, food hypersensitivity must be considered to have a strong psychosocial impact.


Lots more details at medscape, which you can join for free.

Link is http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/549405_1 .

K.

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 23, 2007 1:10 pm 
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Joined: Thu Aug 24, 2006 1:42 am
Posts: 222
Location: Victoria, British Columbia
Quote:
The results suggest that it is rather the risk of food reactions and measures to avoid them that are associated with lower HRQL than the clinical reactivity induced by food intake.

This quote is perhaps at the heart of why it is so important we get the information out there about food allergies. If we change the public's view of allergies to "this is what to look for in an allergic reaction, and why we must avoid exposure" from "these people with allergies make requests that are inconvienient", I think we would see that the stress levels lift. It is the burden of 100% avoidance combined with the knowledge that a lot of people don't 'get it' that challenges my family's quality of life.

JMHO.

Caroline

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son anaphylactic to peanuts


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 25, 2007 11:36 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
I agree, Caroline. It makes all the difference if you know that people understand why you do what you do to keep yourself or your child safe, and support you.

K.

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 27, 2007 12:35 am 
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Joined: Mon Apr 11, 2005 9:38 pm
Posts: 924
Location: Oakville, Ontario
Thank you for posting the link to this article Karen. I found it very interesting. One of the positive findings I found interesting is that families dealing with a chronic illness are a more cohesive family. At first, I found this to be an odd finding, but upon further reflection, I realised this does make sense... when a family must go above and beyond to care for one of the family members, it does follow that the family dynamics would lead to a more cohesive family.

Many of the findings are concerning, which I guess is not overly surprising. I feel concern about the mental health of children dealing with a chronic illness. As parents, I feel we should try not to burden our children (when they are young) with the efforts involved in keeping them safe. My husband & I never complain, in front of our children, about the worry and the work involved in keeping our son safe. Our son is the most carefree, happy-go-lucky kid, and I really hope he remains this way. He knows he has food allergies, and we are very careful, and we've worked very hard at educating him, but he is still a very happy, full-of-life child (as is our daughter, I should add). I hope we can always frame our son's food allergies in a positive light so he will maintain this positive outlook. We never complain, to our children, about the fact that we never go to restaurants or do not travel further than a couple of hours from home. We always focus on the fun we are going to have with the choices we do have available to our family. I suppose our son's attitude could change as he gets older, but we will do everything in our power to teach him to have a positive outlook. We teach this to both of our children.

_________________
15 yr old daughter: no health issues
12 yr old son: allergic to peanuts, tree nuts, eggs, fish, sesame, sunflower, mustard, poppy seeds, green peas, some fruits, instructed to avoid all other legumes (except soy & green beans), pollen, cats, horses


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