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PostPosted: Thu Jan 25, 2007 11:56 am 
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Joined: Thu Aug 24, 2006 1:42 am
Posts: 222
Location: Victoria, British Columbia
Check this out:

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/LAC.20070125.HPICARD25/TPStory/Education

Quote:
As it stands, the safety of children depends on where they live, and on the willingness of their parents to roll up their sleeves and duke it out with school officials.

That's a tragedy, and an injustice.

Public institutions such as schools should be setting an example of equality and integration, and they should be adapting to the new reality; large numbers of children in society living with chronic health conditions.


It gives me chills. He is dead on.

Caroline2

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son anaphylactic to peanuts


Last edited by Caroline2 on Thu Jan 25, 2007 10:07 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 25, 2007 2:02 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2005 6:39 pm
Posts: 2945
Location: Toronto
I know! André Picard was bang on with the thrust of his article.

Reminded me of Ontario MPP Dave Levac saying that uniform procedures, such as Sabrina's Law, were necessary "to avoid the arguing and the gnashing of teeth in the protection of a child."

My only criticism is that André upholds the US as a good example, but neglects to mention that there are still many states that prohibit children from carrying their Epis and inhalers. (This is changing but slowly, and state by state). Stilll, details, details, a great column.

It's exactly the kind of message in the mainstream media that helps parents like you when you're talking to the school and school board.

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Allergic to soy, peanut, shellfish, penicillin


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 25, 2007 7:36 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6456
Location: Ottawa
Quote:

My only criticism is that André upholds the US as a good example, but neglects to mention that there are still many states that prohibit children from carrying their Epis and inhalers.

Yes, but the US have laws that protect the rights of all students (504) whereas in Canada only Ontario has legislation (Bill 3/aka Sabrina's Law).
What we need is for all Canadian students to be afforded the same opportunity- to go to school and to be safe.

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Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 27, 2007 1:02 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
A member of my group who is a teacher and a parent of a child with FAs sent me this response, which certainly provides some food for thought.

She said it was okay for me to post it here.

K.

==================================

I am writing to you in response to the article "Schools need an injection of common sense". Feel free to share my opinions with anyone.

I agree that the students must have their medical needs met, but I don't think it is the teacher's responsibility. Proper people have to be a part of the school to take care of this stuff. Perhaps, they should put nurses back in the schools. The teachers (and secretaries for that matter) have taken on so many duties over the years that it's hard to perform their actual role. I didn't go in to the profession of teaching to become a nurse, social worker, corrections officer, psychologist, lawyer, doctor, family therapist.... you get the point... and with all these roles that teachers now must perform to fill in the gaps of where our society falls short, it's a wonder teachers have time for education in the classroom I realize most people don't understand how the role of a "teacher" has been stretched over the years, and how difficult it is to perform all that society expects of us to an acceptable degree. Being both a teacher and a parent of an allergic child, it worries me to know that one teacher alone with a degree in education and a class of 25-35 children will be expected to carry out all the "duties" of a teacher, while keeping my child safe.

Of course, teachers should have some training in EpiPen, glucose reading, etc... but to put the responsibility on the teachers who are not qualified in these areas, who did not choose a medical profession, and who are not paid appropriately for this responsibility, is unfair.

I wonder if nurses in the schools could be a solution...

Nancy P.

==================================

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Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 27, 2007 6:07 pm 
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Joined: Thu Aug 24, 2006 1:42 am
Posts: 222
Location: Victoria, British Columbia
I certainly understand that teachers these days are overburdened with a lot of responsibilities, and I completely agree that the health community must do more to assist education professionals in fulfilling students' medical needs. I wish that a school nurse were an option, but I would be surprised if there was funding or staffing to provide a nurse for each school, all the time. (I know it couldn't happen in our area -- the most they can do is visit the school for a couple of hours every 2 weeks.)

So... what to do. Teachers and school staff are 'front line' with children: do they get first aid training? It is my understanding that teachers and school staff do need to know emergency procedures. However, it should not be their responsibility to figure out what they have to do for kids with severe medical issues. There should be strong policies that administrators and school boards develop with or by health professionals. It is the government that is ultimately responsible for the safety of the students, and they need to provide the tools and training to make sure everyone knows their part in helping kids with serious medical concerns. Is this how Sabrina's Law works? If you are in Ontario, please let me know...

Until we have it figured out, a partial solution to this issue could look something like this: my friend in the US works in a public school from 11 am - 2:30 pm (perfect hours for her, as she wants to be there for her kids before and after school). Her duties are to answer the telephones at lunch and provide general admin support. She also has complete first aid training and, in those hours, she is the person that children go to if they have a bleeding nose, not feeling well and need to go home, want a band-aid or. . . need their epi-pen or glucous monitors. Although she has helped a few kids with minor scrapes and whatnot, she has not had a serious medical emergency since she started there. I don't think this is a bad system, but of course this keeps the responsibility on the school staff to deal with health issues.

Caroline

_________________
son anaphylactic to peanuts


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 27, 2007 9:13 pm 
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Joined: Thu Sep 22, 2005 11:39 pm
Posts: 1141
Location: saskatchewan, canada
Quote:
do they get first aid training?


When I took my post secondary education in "Early Childhood Education" I was absolutely stunned when my friend in post secondary education for "Education" was NOT taking ANY first aid/CPR training and I was. Last I heard it was NOT a requirement...now whether that's local or more widespread I don't know.

_________________
DD age 9 1/2 -peanuts, nuts,
DD age 7 1/2 - milk, eggs, chicken, peanuts, treenuts, cats, dogs,
DS age 2 1/2
Husband- asthma, eggs, treenuts, fish, shellfish environmental
Self - penicillan, eurithromiacin, mild laytex allergy.


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 28, 2007 7:36 am 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
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Location: Ottawa
I'm surprised about the glucose monitors. Here in Ontario we have a Community Care Access Centre which is a part of the Ontario Ministry of Health and they regulate community nursing.
They have a school program which sends nurse, physiotherapists, dieticians and Personal Support Workers into the schools to assist with medical needs.
I work for a community nursing agency and I send nurses in to feed via feeding tubes and give medications.
I have just finished arranging training for a PSW to learn the chest percussion routine for CF so that we can take this role over form (the more expensive) physiotherapist.
I would be surprised if the CCAC woould not consider glucose monitoring to be within the scope of the community nurse.
Again this I only know about the Ontario system.

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Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 28, 2007 1:16 pm 
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Joined: Thu Aug 24, 2006 1:42 am
Posts: 222
Location: Victoria, British Columbia
I will double check with my friend who works at her US school part-time about glucous monitoring. (Frankly, it also disturbs me that the kids aren't carrying their EpiPen. What if there is an emergency before she gets there at 11am? I wonder who is in charge.)

The more I think about this whole issue of schools and medical protocols, the more complicated I see it is. What an administrative conundrum -- and it is so scary that it directly affects the safety of kids at school.

Caroline2


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