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 Post subject: Inaccurate articles
PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 2007 6:44 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6455
Location: Ottawa
I am having a hard time letting this go. When I see inaccurate articles on parenting boards and I notify them about it, nothing happens. I see inaccurate articles on internet newpaper websites and again I bring it to their attention and...nothing is done.
I know that anyone and his brother can put stuff out on the internet and you really have to be careful but doesn't anyone police the newspapers and magazines?
Apparently not.
:?
Here are two such articles that are bothering me:
http://www.canadianparents.ca/CPO/Toddl ... 56407.html
Speaks of new labeling laws but doesn't point out the laws are USA laws. This can lead some parents into a false sense of security.
and
http://www.canadianparents.ca/CPO/Toddl ... 91919.html
The Dairy farmers of Ontario put this one out stating (3x) that milk allergies are rare.

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Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 2007 7:21 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2005 6:39 pm
Posts: 2943
Location: Toronto
I hear you.

I came across an article on the Mayo Clinic's site - yes, the Mayo Clinic, temple of health excellence - repeating all sorts of information about how holding off the introduction of certain allergenic foods may prevent allergies. It even went so far as to repeat the old saw about women with allergies in the family avoiding nuts in their diets while pregnant.

Allergic Living, as you know, spent a lot of time investigating the latest thinking on allergy prevention ('Protecting Baby" article in the Winter issue.) In it, we interviewed several leading experts in Canada and the U.S., whohad studied all the important studies around pregnancy, breastfeeding and solids introduction. To a person, they said there was just as much indication that keeping foods in a pregnant woman's diet might be a more natural way (and therefore safer way) to introduce potential allergens to a fetus.

They also all said that the old guidelines on which ages to introduce allergenic solids after the age of one were too precise and not fact-based.

But here's the Mayo Clinic, repeating all the strict, old, conservative theories from guidelines that the American Academy of Pediatrics is working to rewrite. How are we supposed to create awareness for this community when people read stuff like that from the Mayo Clinic?

That's my rant. But it bothers me enough that I'm going to let a couple of the doctors we spoke to know. Perhaps they'd contact the Mayo Clinic about this.

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Allergic to soy, peanut, shellfish, penicillin


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 2007 7:52 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6455
Location: Ottawa
I wrote back to the editor of the website and asked her when I can expect the articles to be edited and if not why.
I told her that I was appalled that she would have to go to the Dairy Farmers of Ontario to get an article on milk allergies and that I would see what was available from Anaphylaxis Canada, the Calgary Allergy Network and the Allergy/Asthma Information Association and I copied the e-mail to each of them.
The Dairy Farmers of Ontario, :roll: yeah, that's gonna be objective!
What, do people just offer articles to websites and hope they get published?

_________________
Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Mar 23, 2007 9:01 pm 
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Joined: Thu Sep 22, 2005 11:39 pm
Posts: 1141
Location: saskatchewan, canada
Quote:
Only about 6 percent of all children have clinically diagnosed food allergies. This number is rather small...


I don't exactly consider 6 percent of all children a small number... and the second article said 6 - 8 %. *ONLY* six percent of kids is more than 1 in 20!!!

_________________
DD age 9 1/2 -peanuts, nuts,
DD age 7 1/2 - milk, eggs, chicken, peanuts, treenuts, cats, dogs,
DS age 2 1/2
Husband- asthma, eggs, treenuts, fish, shellfish environmental
Self - penicillan, eurithromiacin, mild laytex allergy.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Apr 28, 2007 4:44 pm 
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Joined: Wed Apr 11, 2007 11:15 pm
Posts: 3
I don't mean to be obtuse, but what in the first article you have listed is incorrect? And how do you know the information is incorrect?

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Daughter 12 months: anaphylactic to dairy, allergic to eggs, soy, peanuts, fish
eczema


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Apr 28, 2007 8:56 pm 
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Joined: Thu Sep 22, 2005 11:39 pm
Posts: 1141
Location: saskatchewan, canada
Quote:
One way to prevent food allergies is not to introduce commonly-known allergenic foods until later in your baby's life, at 1, 2 or even 3 years old. This approach is referred to as "delayed introduction."


Personally this statement is problematic. There is nothing to back it up. Allergists don't support it...they are just baffled for ANY ideas on how to prevent allergies The statement implies that food allergies are preventable and therefore "the parents' fault" if the child develops allergies. We (husband and I) actually attended prenatal classes in which this was brought up AS FACT...and that allergies are prevetable. BOTH my girls have allergies even though we did this. It is unfortunate that with all we have to deal with when advocating for our kids...there are others out there who have been told AS FACT that it is OUR FAULT.

P.S. IT ISN"T OUR FAULT!!! :D

Quote:
Help for the allergy sufferer: While there is no cure for food allergies, eliminating foods from your diet is often easier said than done. Reading ingredient labels of foods can be a daunting and confusing task. Eight major foods - milk, eggs, fish, shellfish, tree nuts, peanuts, wheat, and soybeans - account for 90 percent of food allergies. If you or your child suffers from one of these common food allergies, there is some good news that makes reading ingredient labels easier. As of January 1, 2006, food manufacturers must include a listing of the plain English name of these culprit foods just below the ingredient listing. These new standards provide a definite improvement for the food allergy sufferer


Those "easy read" label laws will only be happening south of the border...not in Canada. Since the magazine is Canadian Parent...it implies that the label laws will be happening in Canada.

_________________
DD age 9 1/2 -peanuts, nuts,
DD age 7 1/2 - milk, eggs, chicken, peanuts, treenuts, cats, dogs,
DS age 2 1/2
Husband- asthma, eggs, treenuts, fish, shellfish environmental
Self - penicillan, eurithromiacin, mild laytex allergy.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Apr 28, 2007 9:58 pm 
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Joined: Sat Apr 16, 2005 12:09 am
Posts: 1054
Quote:
Fortunately, most allergic reactions in babies are temporary and the culprit foods can usually be reintroduced when the child is older.

In addition to those mentioned, I also found this statement very misleading and wide sweeping. Not very responsible journalism if you ask me.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Apr 28, 2007 11:01 pm 
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Joined: Wed Apr 11, 2007 11:15 pm
Posts: 3
Thank you for informing me. I guess I'm fortunate in that my daughter's allergist never suggested her allergies were my fault. I That isn't to say I don't feel that way; just that the guilt I feel is self-inflicted. :-)
But anyway, thank you for expounding on your opinions.

_________________
Daughter 12 months: anaphylactic to dairy, allergic to eggs, soy, peanuts, fish
eczema


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Apr 29, 2007 6:39 am 
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Site Admin

Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6455
Location: Ottawa
Swiftyjess-
Quote:
I don't mean to be obtuse, but what in the first article you have listed is incorrect? And how do you know the information is incorrect?

No question is a bad question :)
The statement I object to is:
Quote:
As of January 1, 2006, food manufacturers must include a listing of the plain English name of these culprit foods just below the ingredient listing. These new standards provide a definite improvement for the food allergy sufferer.

The reason I object is that the authors are American and are referring to a USA law. The article is published on Canadian Parents Online and by its' very title implies the information it gives is Canadian.
I object because they omitted the reference to this law as an American law.
I am concerned that those newly diagnosed who are seeking information may believe that they need only to look for the words peanut, milk, wheat, egg etc., and failing to find these words, they may think the food is safe to eat. :shock:

_________________
Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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