You are viewing Allergic Living Canada | Switch to United States

Talking Allergies

* FAQ    * Search
* Login   * Register
It is currently Tue Jul 29, 2014 7:10 pm

All times are UTC - 4 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 7 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Mon May 14, 2007 10:01 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2005 8:55 pm
Posts: 412
Location: Vancouver, BC
In the May/June edition of "Blueprint" magazine (it's a Martha Stewart mag targetted to younger, urban females), they have an article on what a doctor keeps in her family medical kit.

The kit contains an Epipen, as well as the usual stuff, and the caption says that she doesn't have LTA's herself, but she keeps it in case a friend or neighbor is ever having a reaction. It does say it is a prescribed device.

Does anyone know any situations re: using an Epipen that has not been prescribed for that particular person? This question keeps coming up for me: "If there is a child having a reaction, and they don't have an Epipen , can you give someone elses?"

Common sense and the Good Samaritan Act would say "yes", but I wondered if anyone had a concrete example, or if they knew which organization I could ask. I had asked a woman who was teaching first aid and she said "Worksafe BC" did not suggest it. But that seems wrong. I was reading of a case of a little boy in Australia who died after that very situation happened, and although there was no talk of what the consequences are, the way it was worded made it clear that everyone thought the wrong decision had been made.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon May 14, 2007 10:22 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 9:38 pm
Posts: 1643
Location: Toronto
I don't know who could tell you the correct answer about *what if*, but I can give you some food for thought.

If a person is diagnosed with a food allergy and has a reaction, that's one thing. But, there are other situations that could appear to a non-medical person to be anaphylaxis when in reality it is not. The doctor in the article could take a person's blood pressure before giving them an epi-pen. I can't. If a person is having an anxiety attack it can mimic anaphylaxis -- but in that case bp would be up not down, and the epi would raise it even higher.

This came up in a discussion with my son, when we were discussing whether schools should have extra epi-pens in the office (provided by the school) for students not diagnosed. I have to say I agree with him. Unless you are a medical professional who is capable of making a quick diagnoses, I don't think you should be giving an epi-pen in those circumstances. On the other hand, if someone with an allergy forgot their epi-pen, I would give one of mine in an emergency.

_________________
self: allergy to sesame seeds and peanuts
3 sons each with at least one of the following allergies: peniciilin, sulfa-based antibiotic, latex, insect bites/stings


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon May 14, 2007 3:59 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2005 8:55 pm
Posts: 412
Location: Vancouver, BC
Yeah, that's a good point.

I wonder who we could get a definitive answer from. Maybe an allergist? Or a lawyer?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon May 14, 2007 7:07 pm 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2005 6:39 pm
Posts: 2943
Location: Toronto
I think this one is a judgment call - case by case.

I know that I'm always glad that I have an EpiPen on me in case of an emergency. And since I've used it a few times, I have no fear of it.

Allergists sometimes say that people forget to ask a key question of someone in obvious distress that has alllergy-like symptoms: did you recently eat? If so, what? If it's a known allergen, even with a person's first reaction, I think I'd err on the side of using the Epi if symptoms indicate that this is anaphylaxis. Guess, I'd hope a parent wouldn't try to kill me later.

This might also not be with a child - consider that 1 in 25 Americans is allergic to seafood, largely adult onset. If sitting in a restaurant, and someone starts going down for the count with a reaction, I think (hope!) I would know enough about the symptoms to be able to judge whether it was anaphylaxis or a different type of distress. (I certainly would mention I had a pen).

To me, the key would be to look for a food context.

_________________
Allergic to soy, peanut, shellfish, penicillin


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon May 14, 2007 8:21 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
Or an insect sting context... if you are outdoors.

K.

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jun 16, 2007 4:14 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed May 31, 2006 12:18 am
Posts: 45
Location: Edmonton
I took a CPR course this past february and as far as i can remember, the Good Samaritan Act varies from province to province. But according to my manual "As long as you act reasonably and carefully, you don't need to worry. . .Just use common sense and don't try to do something that you're not trained to do." (Canadian Red Cross, 2006).
But administering meds is an entirely different story - even if it's prescribed for them. We can HELP someone take their medication but we can't actually give it to them. This is really important in schools; parents must sign forms in order to give permission to the teacher or another staff member to administer medication - you can't even give someone an advil if they have a headache. Here's a link i found about the Good Samaritan Act. In Alberta, for example, it's called the Emergency Medical Aid Act.
http://www.cafb-acba.ca/english/GetInvo ... anLaw.html
I hope this helps. And for all it's worth, if i saw a child who had many signs of anaphylaxis, i wouldn't be able to live with myself if i just sat there and watched him/her die. If they had an EpiPen, i would give it to them

Caroline

_________________
Anaphylaxis to fish, nut, peanuts, soy, birch, and grass.
OAS


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Jun 22, 2007 9:03 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jan 10, 2006 9:25 pm
Posts: 238
Location: Thornhill
It's another reason to carry extra epipens !!!(it is one of my anxiety nightmares - being somewhere more than 30 minutes from medical attention, having 2 epis and someone other than my daughter needing one)
When I raised the scenario with another allergic parent - essentially would you part with an epipen in this scenario, they reminded me that you are not able to administer prescribed medication to someone else, other than the person it is prescribed for. A big liability here for the reasons that came in the previous posts.
That said, you can get epis over the counter now as well.

_________________
renie
daughter: ana for egg, sesame, dairy, pistachio/cashew/hazelnut. on contact. allergic+ to soy protein isolate, environmental allergies (e.g. dogs, dust mites). asthma. eczema.
son: peanuts, tree-nuts, OAS, environmental allergies. asthma.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 7 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 4 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group