You are viewing Allergic Living Canada | Switch to United States

Talking Allergies

* FAQ    * Search
* Login   * Register
It is currently Thu Apr 24, 2014 11:34 am

All times are UTC - 4 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 13 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Thu Jul 26, 2007 1:32 pm 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2005 6:39 pm
Posts: 2928
Location: Toronto
There I was, working on the news pages for Allergic Living mag last night, when I stumbled upon the early reports of this. Just about fell off my chair.

Eureka - or at least one hopes so. (We'll do a good, full story on this in the next AL issue.) Gwen

press release
N.C. A&T Scientist Develops Process for Allergen-free Peanuts

GREENSBORO, N.C. – An agricultural researcher at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University has developed a simple process to make allergen-free peanuts. The new process – believed to be a first for food science – could provide relief to millions of peanut allergy sufferers, and be an enormous boon to the entire peanut industry.

Doug Speight of the N.C. A&T Office of Outreach and Technology Transfer said food companies are showing a strong interest in licensing the process, which does not degrade the taste or quality of treated peanuts, and might even render them easier to process for use as a food ingredient.

Immunoassays showed 100 percent inactivation of peanut allergens in whole roasted kernels, and the processed peanuts showed no reaction in tests on human serums from severely allergic individuals. The inventor, Dr. Mohamed Ahmedna, is optimizing the process further to remove allergens from other foods.

“We are extremely pleased that we were able to find such a simple solution to a vexing problem that has enormous economic and public health ramifications, both for peanut sensitive individuals, and the food industry as a whole,” said Ahmedna, associate professor of food science in N.C. A&T’s School of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences.

Peanut and tree nut allergies are the most severe of all food allergies, affecting approximately 3 million Americans, and causing 100 – 150 deaths from anaphylactic shock annually and many more hospitalizations. In industrialized nations, the allergy has been rapidly increasing in children, for causes that are not entirely understood. One study showed that between 1997 and 2002, peanut allergies in children doubled in the United States. Today, an estimated one percent of all children suffer from the allergy.

_________________
Allergic to soy, peanut, shellfish, penicillin


Last edited by gwentheeditor on Thu Aug 02, 2007 10:13 am, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jul 29, 2007 10:23 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Jul 03, 2006 8:23 pm
Posts: 190
Can you imagine the possibilities? I'm cautiously optimistic about this.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jul 29, 2007 9:10 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 9:38 pm
Posts: 1643
Location: Toronto
Pesonally, this whole idea scares me. Who is this peanut for? Are people with pa going to want to eat it? A lot of parents don't even want to feed their child soynut butter because it could confuse them when trying to teach to stay away from peanuts.

People without the allergy aren't going to want it. They are quite happy with the peanut they already have.

If manufacturer's start using it, how do we know which type of peanut they are using? Can you imagine trying to get accurate information when you call to find out about trace amounts? Will they specify whether they are using *peanut* or *genetically modified peanut*?

I don't imagine every peanut farmer in the US - never mind the whole world - is going to invest in this new peanut.

I just feel like I'll be back where I was nearly 20 years ago. No idea what's safe and what's not.

_________________
self: allergy to sesame seeds and peanuts
3 sons each with at least one of the following allergies: peniciilin, sulfa-based antibiotic, latex, insect bites/stings


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jul 29, 2007 10:04 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Sep 22, 2005 11:39 pm
Posts: 1141
Location: saskatchewan, canada
I totally agree with AnnaMarie. Then there's the whole possibility of the new GMO peanuts being grown and cross polinated with other strains of currently grown GMO peanuts and then what??? Personally I see GMO's as a big part of the problem...and screwing with nature only leads to more problems.

_________________
DD age 9 1/2 -peanuts, nuts,
DD age 7 1/2 - milk, eggs, chicken, peanuts, treenuts, cats, dogs,
DS age 2 1/2
Husband- asthma, eggs, treenuts, fish, shellfish environmental
Self - penicillan, eurithromiacin, mild laytex allergy.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jul 29, 2007 10:08 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Sep 13, 2006 10:59 am
Posts: 63
Location: Ohio
Wow what a great finding. I hope it does come to fruition.

I am a bit skeptical about the ability to change the individual level response. Coming from a mother of a child who has several different types of food allergies, it makes more intuitive sense that it is the child's immune system reaction rather than the specific properties of a particular food. My child is allergic to oat and turkey, as an example, neither of which is considered one of the top allergens. The logic of this technique implies that the problem rests with the food not the individual. At least with my child, I feel the problem more likely rests with his immune system rather than the food.

Maybe its an interaction effect?

Either way, I would love to hear more about the findings. :D

_________________
2.5 year old: allergic to wheat, dairy, egg, peanut, oat, turkey, and cats
5 year old: no known allergies
Husband no known allergies
Me allergy to morphine only


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jul 30, 2007 6:27 am 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6429
Location: Ottawa
I suspect they will sell these peanuts to companies who want to use peanuts for texture or taste in some products but who also want to be able to boast peanut-free on items created on the same lines or in the same facililty.
I am thrilled that someone is doing any research into food allergies and food allergens as all news wil help get the message out there that this is a issue that needs to be recognised.

_________________
Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jul 30, 2007 12:51 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
I saw this article as well when doing some late-night surfing, and at the beginning just really didn't know what to make of it... It almost seemed too good to be true. Almost weird that there has been any kind of breakthrough.

It will be very interesting to see what comes of all this. I can totally relate to what you have said, AnnaMarie. It's kind of one of those "be careful what you wish for" situations!

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 31, 2007 8:15 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 9:38 pm
Posts: 1643
Location: Toronto
saskmommyof2, I also think GMO's are part of the problem. I don't think they are the only cause of allergies, but I do think they are a contributing factor in why there is such an increase.

_________________
self: allergy to sesame seeds and peanuts
3 sons each with at least one of the following allergies: peniciilin, sulfa-based antibiotic, latex, insect bites/stings


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 31, 2007 11:08 pm 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2005 6:39 pm
Posts: 2928
Location: Toronto
There are GMOs, but this isn't one of them. It's said to be a process that "deactivates" the allergencity, so a process regular peanuts are put through.

We'll have to hear more about how that works to know if it's safe, and all sorts of human trials need to be done. But still, I thought it was exciting.

There will be hurdles even if it does work out. Food labelling - oy!

Manus would have to be clear on whether using the "safe" or "unsafe" peanut. Could we believe they all did the processing properly. No, it's never easy. But neither was Sabrina's Law. It might be doable.

One step at a time, though.

_________________
Allergic to soy, peanut, shellfish, penicillin


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Aug 01, 2007 9:56 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 9:38 pm
Posts: 1643
Location: Toronto
gwentheeditor wrote:
There are GMOs, but this isn't one of them. It's said to be a process that "deactivates" the allergencity, so a process regular peanuts are put through.


Is it *deactivated* before or after it's grown? My understanding was that it is being grown with this difference. And to do that -- it must be modified. Maybe not genetically, but somehow. That idea scares me more then the allergy does.

_________________
self: allergy to sesame seeds and peanuts
3 sons each with at least one of the following allergies: peniciilin, sulfa-based antibiotic, latex, insect bites/stings


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Aug 01, 2007 11:31 am 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2005 6:39 pm
Posts: 2928
Location: Toronto
No, the process happens after the peanut is grown in this instance.

We're doing an article in the Fall issue of AL, so that's right from the head researcher.

_________________
Allergic to soy, peanut, shellfish, penicillin


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Aug 02, 2007 9:14 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 9:38 pm
Posts: 1643
Location: Toronto
Now you're gaining my interest. :) I'm looking forward to reading the full article.

_________________
self: allergy to sesame seeds and peanuts
3 sons each with at least one of the following allergies: peniciilin, sulfa-based antibiotic, latex, insect bites/stings


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Aug 02, 2007 10:11 am 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2005 6:39 pm
Posts: 2928
Location: Toronto
Although, FAAN's Medical Advisory Board is cautioning that the university may be over-stating the achievement. They're suggesting that the university's findings are encouraging but quite premature.

It is unfortunate that some of the media coverage has sounded as if we've got peanut allergy licked. Not so fast ...

_________________
Allergic to soy, peanut, shellfish, penicillin


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 13 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 4 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group