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PostPosted: Fri Sep 14, 2007 11:39 pm 
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http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/co ... 00260.html

People who have allergies/asthma cannot tolerate flavored oils. They are not just a flavoring; nor are they an extract. They are highly potent. Nothing else is mixed with this oil to lessen the toxicity as are extracts. They are 100% oil and very very potent.

People with allergies/asthma can end up in the ER having an anaphylactic attack from digesting a "flavored oil". And they do not list the specific flavored oil on the ingredients as they should. Look for a petition regarding labeling of foods and healthcare products.

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Allergic to shellfish, penicillin, blackflies, fire ants, harsh chemicals in shampoos; hot foods; molds; did I say fire ants...hehe


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 14, 2007 11:55 pm 
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JustineHH -I see you have found more information on the flavoured oils that you were wondering about a while back.

It is true that one can be allergic to just about any food but I don't think that all people with allergies and asthma are allergic to flavoured oils. Is that what you meant to say?

I agree that we need clearer label laws in Canada.

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Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 15, 2007 3:07 am 
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http://eethomp.com/AT/dangerous_oils.html

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/co ... 00944.html



Quote:
For the seriously allergic, "I've characterized it as akin to playing Russian roulette with a really big gun that has 100 chambers and only one bullet. Sooner or later if you eat these products, you're going to eat the wrong one," he said.

About 12 million Americans have some degree of food allergy. Severe food allergies trigger 30,000 emergency room visits a year, and 150 to 200 deaths a year. Food labels help the allergic avoid ingredients that could sicken them.


I'm saying I don't feel like playing Russian roulette! :o

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Allergic to shellfish, penicillin, blackflies, fire ants, harsh chemicals in shampoos; hot foods; molds; did I say fire ants...hehe


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 15, 2007 8:30 am 
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You quoted the article related to confusing label laws and the fact that "may contains..." are placed on so many labels that those who should be heeding this caution are not always.
Yes, in this case you could very well be playing "Russian Roulette" when eating the food.

_________________
Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 17, 2007 9:47 am 
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Joined: Tue Sep 12, 2006 8:25 pm
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Location: Winnipeg
I agree that it is very dangerous for any allergic person to ingest anything without knowing exactly what is in it (calling the manufacturer to double check labeling etc.), but a flavoured oil that is intended for consumption is no more or less dangerous than anything else. For example a food grade basil oil, would be perfectly safe for someone who isn't allergic to any of it's ingredients.

However aromatherapy oils, which are not intended for consumption, would be incredibly dangerous to take orally or use in any type of cooking. It would be very important to differentiate between the two if you're planning to use an oil in the kitchen.

And even if an aromatherapy oil would be toxic if taken internally that doesn't mean that it doesn't have therapeutic benefits if used properly. For example eucalyptus oil is highly toxic if ingested, but can provide relief from congestion if inhaled. There have even been some studies done suggesting that it may have an antibacterial effect in the upper respiratory tract, and so may be helpful in warding of respiratory viruses.

Then there is the whole grey area of essential oils used for medicinal purposes (i.e. oil of oregano), and I agree completely that I would be wary of taking any of these internally or even topically. They are not well studied or well regulated, and could be particularly dangerous to allergic individuals.

So anyway, I don't think an allergic person necessarily needs to avoid all of these products.

_________________
1 son allergic to eggs, peanuts, green peas, chick peas, lentils and tomatoes
(avoiding tree nuts and most other legumes too)
1 son allergic to eggs, and has outgrown peanuts
Both with many environmental allergies, asthma and eczema


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 17, 2007 10:30 pm 
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Quote:
So anyway, I don't think an allergic person necessarily needs to avoid all of these products.


That's not true and I think you're trying to sell the products.
http://www.answers.com/topic/essential-oil?cat=health
Read this entire article. Especially the parts about people with allergies, pregnant mothers and babies. These are dangerous chemicals and NOT meant to be ingested. The manufacturers could care less about our health and the FDA turns the other way. Hopefully someone new in power will get the FDA to pay attention!

These oils are extremely concentrated and potent. Unlike plain old flavoring. They are 35X stronger than flavoring. And maybe 5X stronger than extracts. Try pouring extract on your tongue and see if it doesn't burn. Essential Oils are 35X stronger. Shouldn't be put on your skin or ingested.

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Allergic to shellfish, penicillin, blackflies, fire ants, harsh chemicals in shampoos; hot foods; molds; did I say fire ants...hehe


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 18, 2007 6:59 am 
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JustineHH,
Firstly, I am confused. In you first posting on this thread you spoke of flavoured oils and now you are speaking of essential oils.
Quote:
People who have allergies/asthma cannot tolerate flavored oils. They are not just a flavoring; nor are they an extract. They are highly potent. Nothing else is mixed with this oil to lessen the toxicity as are extracts. They are 100% oil and very very potent.

I think that we can all agree that they are two different things.

Secondly, let's keep this friendly. You may not agree with everything you read posted here and that is OK. We are dicussing issues and offering what works for us. We need to take the information in the same friendly manner in which it is offered and do our own research to determine if it applies to us specifically.

I don't believe that Twinmom was selling anything nor was she suggesting that you ingest something that is non-edible.
Quote:
Then there is the whole grey area of essential oils used for medicinal purposes (i.e. oil of oregano), and I agree completely that I would be wary of taking any of these internally or even topically. They are not well studied or well regulated, and could be particularly dangerous to allergic individuals.

_________________
Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 18, 2007 9:40 am 
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Location: Canada
I'm guessing that Justine meant "essential oils" all along --- the anise oil mentioned in the Washington Post article is an essential oil (i.e. a very concentrated distillation of anise with nothing added to dilute it.) I've never heard of essential oils causing allergies before unless the person is allergic to the source of the oil . . . but I wouldn't use essential oils in cooking unless I were 100% sure the oil were food grade + I checked with the manufacturer or unless I produced it myself!

(Flavoured oil on the other hand would be cooking oil ( i.e. olive) with flavours/herbs added . . . I don't think that would pose a danger to anyone.)


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 18, 2007 1:44 pm 
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Location: Winnipeg
JustineHH, I assure you I'm not trying to sell anything to anyone. :lol: Just another person trying to learn as much as I can about allergies, and share what I do know.

My concern was that you seem to be using the terms for a couple of different types of products interchangeably, and that might be confusing for someone. Aromatherapy oils (never intended for consumption), essential oils (sometimes intended for consumption, but of dubious safety...I agree with Susan that these are the ones you are trying to warn against), and flavoured oils are 3 different things.

Helen wrote:

(Flavoured oil on the other hand would be cooking oil ( i.e. olive) with flavours/herbs added . . . I don't think that would pose a danger to anyone.)

Yes, this is what I was saying. Unless a person had an allergy to one of the ingredients (the herb, the oil used as a base, preservatives, seasonings etc.) there would be no reason to avoid it.

_________________
1 son allergic to eggs, peanuts, green peas, chick peas, lentils and tomatoes
(avoiding tree nuts and most other legumes too)
1 son allergic to eggs, and has outgrown peanuts
Both with many environmental allergies, asthma and eczema


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 28, 2007 6:10 pm 
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Posts: 52
People who use EO's should know about this too.

Quote:
Some essential oils have not been thoroughly tested and may be toxic. The oils to be avoided include arnica, bitter almond, calamus, cinnamon, clove, mugwort, sage, wintergreen, and wormwood. Pregnant women should avoid these and basil, fennel, marjoram, myrrh, oregano, star anise, and tarragon. In general, any essential oils that have not been tested or lack adequate information should be avoided.

Some essential oils may cause the skin to become photosensitive, or more sensitive to sunlight and more likely to become sunburned. Essential oils that are photosensitizing include bergamot, orange, lemon, lime, grapefruit, and angelica root. These oils should be avoided before exposure to sunlight and ultraviolet light such as in tanning beds. People with sun-related skin problems should avoid these oils.

Those with health conditions should use care with essential oils. Steam inhalation of essential oils is not recommended for asthma sufferers. The essential oils of rosemary, fennel and sage should be avoided by those with epilepsy.

Pregnant and nursing women should use caution with essential oils, because their skin and bodies are more sensitive and some oils may cause adverse reactions. Essential oils should not be used during the first three months of pregnancy, and after that they should only be used when heavily diluted with base oils. Women with histories of miscarriage should not use essential oils during pregnancy at all. Pregnant women should perform skin tests before using essential oils. Essential oils are not recommended for nursing mothers.

Essential oils should be used with care on children. They are not recommended for children under one year of age, and should be heavily diluted with base oils when used as a skin massage or lotion for children.

Essential oils should be stored out of the reach of children. Clean glass containers are the best storage vessels, and should be dark in color to keep sunlight from damaging the oil. Some essential oils can damage wood, varnish, plastic, and clothing, and should be handled with care."

This has nothing to do with people like myself who have allergies. It can be dangerous for people who don't have allergies.

And ALL the people using EO's should know that they can be dangerous too.

_________________
Allergic to shellfish, penicillin, blackflies, fire ants, harsh chemicals in shampoos; hot foods; molds; did I say fire ants...hehe


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 28, 2007 6:14 pm 
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Helen wrote:
I'm guessing that Justine meant "essential oils" all along --- the anise oil mentioned in the Washington Post article is an essential oil (i.e. a very concentrated distillation of anise with nothing added to dilute it.) I've never heard of essential oils causing allergies before unless the person is allergic to the source of the oil . . . but I wouldn't use essential oils in cooking unless I were 100% sure the oil were food grade + I checked with the manufacturer or unless I produced it myself!

(Flavoured oil on the other hand would be cooking oil ( i.e. olive) with flavours/herbs added . . . I don't think that would pose a danger to anyone.)


Well now you have heard of someone being allergic. And this is all the new rage adding EO's to foods and cosmetics. People are at home making these toxic cosmetics not knowing anything about EO's. Only that they can make $$ selling the product over the net. I mean we are not Egyptians!

The old flavored oil is not a potent concentrate of the plant and I have never had a problem with that.

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Allergic to shellfish, penicillin, blackflies, fire ants, harsh chemicals in shampoos; hot foods; molds; did I say fire ants...hehe


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 28, 2007 11:15 pm 
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Unfortunately, anyone an sell anything over the internet. It really is buyer beware. The same can be said for information taken from websites. Anyone with a computer can create a webste and say whatever they want. It is best to purchase products or get information from websites or companies that you can research and trust.

I think that it is beneficial for people to remember that before the time of the great pharmacutical companies, dried plants and essential oils where used as medicine. Indeed many medicines are derived from plants. Plant extracts can interact with medications and can cause reactions within the body.

If you have had a reaction to a product that did not identify and ingredient on its' label or if an ingredient that is not concidered safe in food was added to a product to be consumed, you might want to contact the authorities CFIA http://www.inspection.gc.ca/ in Canada and FDA http://www.fda.gov/ in the USA.
If it happened to you, it could happen to anyone.

_________________
Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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