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PostPosted: Fri Jan 20, 2012 8:19 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jul 05, 2010 11:37 am
Posts: 1523
Location: Alberta
http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/her ... ide-policy

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Myself - Seasonal, cats
dd-asthma (trigger - flu) anaphylactic to eggs, severe allergies to bugspray and penicilin,pulmicort
ds-Seasonal, cats and OAS
dh-allergy cats, bugspray and guava, outgrew egg allergy


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 20, 2012 9:41 pm 
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Joined: Mon Apr 18, 2011 2:20 pm
Posts: 150
Location: Barrie Ontario Canada
I have always thought that if someone needed an epipen and couldn't tell me where theirs was (or didn't have one) I would gladly give them mine. I'm sure any parent of a child with allergies would be happy to replace someone else's epi if theirs had been used either by accident or bc it was closest.

Quote:
The mother also stated that she brought an Epi-Pen to the school, and the school reportedly told her that she should just take it home because they probably wouldn't need it.

I don't understand why the school would tell the parent that the epi wasn't necessary. To me that statement alone means the school is responsible for the death and someone needs to pay (not sure who...)

As a teacher I don't care about losing my job bc I gave life saving treatment. I'd rather save a child's (or anyone for that matter) life and get fired than stand by and watch them die!

Quote:
Morals are all okay when Monday morning quarterbacking, but what would happen if that wasn't an allergic reaction and the epipen killed the kid? The teacher would be fired and never get another job ever. The teacher would be publicly humiliated and possibly face criminal charges.

Public school teachers are paid to teach public school, not be emergency room doctors. If a kid has serious medical issues then a public school with hundreds of other kids and their peanut butter sandwiches, milk and bugs might not be the best place for them.
:verymad

Teachers go into the job knowing they will be dealing with medical issues. Yes I agree I became a teacher to teach not give out meds but this goes with the territory and if that is what a child needs to be able to access the same education as everyone else then I will gladly do it! According to this person I should also allow a child to bleed from a cut on their knee and limp around on a broken foot bc I am a medical person just there to teach :banghead

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Sarah
Outgrew: Wheat, corn, egg, chicken, to name a few
Sensitive to Milk/Dairy products
Allergic to: Tree nuts, percocet, toradol, environmental allergies and chemical allergies
Migraines caused by scented products, barometric pressure


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 22, 2012 10:35 am 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6456
Location: Ottawa
Would I administer my daughters epipen on another person who was suspected of having an anaphylaxis reaction? Yes! I would offer to do so if they wished. It makes me think of the cyclist who was stung by a bee during a race...
Quote:
Fortunately, a nearby spectator on the course had an EpiPen — used to inject epinephrine to counteract anaphylaxis — and helped inject Compton as her condition worsened.
A few hours later a stabilized, and fully recovered Compton was thankful for her encounter with the unidentified “good Samaritan” and said she would start carrying an EpiPen, as would her husband and team managers.
"Some things you just can’t predict, but that doesn’t mean you can’t be prepared nonetheless,” she said.

http://velonews.competitor.com/2011/04/ ... ing_169216

There are contraindications for epinephrine:
Quote:
Self-injectable epinephrine should be used with caution in patients with hyperthyroidism, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, or diabetes.

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/578750_6

But, you don't simply stick someone with the pen and go about your business; you stay with them and call 911.

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Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 22, 2012 1:36 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jul 05, 2010 11:37 am
Posts: 1523
Location: Alberta
I have been reminded more than once that teachers are educators not medical practitioners and it scares me that "assisting administering" seems to mean many different things to many people....when policies are unclear...as they are here....it is only a matter of time. Hence, my advocating.

I find most people (parents) assume that all staff in schools who work with our children would just be required to have more emergency training than what they do. With such a large amount of oil patch (dangerous) workers and the amount of time and money and energy spent on safety in that sector....we just take it for granted that that would be a gimme as well as a no brainer.

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Myself - Seasonal, cats
dd-asthma (trigger - flu) anaphylactic to eggs, severe allergies to bugspray and penicilin,pulmicort
ds-Seasonal, cats and OAS
dh-allergy cats, bugspray and guava, outgrew egg allergy


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 22, 2012 5:55 pm 
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Joined: Fri Oct 10, 2008 9:40 pm
Posts: 2034
Location: ottawa
In the meeting with school staff before DS started Jr. K this fall I specifically asked what they would do if any child had an ana reaction and his/her prescribed epi was lost, damaged, couldn't be found etc.. They said without a doubt they would take another child's (second) epipen and administer it to the child in need. They thought it was an odd question but I let them know that their response is not always how others feel. They told me their parental/human/ nurturing, caring, instincts would always come before policies if it meant saving a life.

Quote:
Would I administer my daughters epipen on another person who was suspected of having an anaphylaxis reaction? Yes! I would offer to do so if they wished. It makes me think of the cyclist who was stung by a bee during a race...
I so agree Susan. There also was the situation recently in a ball park I think where a girl was having an ana reaction and her parent's didn't even know but a police officer there who has a child with ana allergies recognized the reaction as just that and administered an epi.

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DD 12 yrs -no allergies
4 yr old DS - asthma/eczema Anaphylactic to Peanuts, all tree nuts, sesame , all pea/lentil legumes, gelatin.
Allergic to trees, grass,ragweed, feathers, dander, mold and dust.
Outgrew eggs, fish, shellfish


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