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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2012 8:20 am 
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Joined: Thu Dec 20, 2007 7:23 pm
Posts: 823
Location: Kingston
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According to Clark, Hollywood often depicts children with asthma, the leading chronic illness of U.S. children, as vulnerable characters, not heroes. Showcasing asthma as a form of weakness adds drama to action films and levity to comedies. The habit of stereotyping asthma in movies, her research suggests, should be rethought by Hollywood and its writers.

Clark says the media, as well as other social contexts like school and peers, matter significantly for how the 9% of Americans under 18 with asthma view their illness and commit to its treatment. Adherence to medication for severe asthma, which requires steady attention and consistent relationships with physicians to monitor symptoms, can fall short among children and adolescents.

"Asthma is not a telethon disease," Clark quotes a mother of a child with asthma in her studies.

In her research, 66 films that dramatized asthma were analyzed, including Goonies, Toy Story 2, As Good As It Gets, Signs, and Without A Paddle. The analysis revealed four main ways of stereotyping asthma: implying that the character with asthma is wimpy; that asthmatic breathing is how a person with asthma reacts under stress; that if a child would just exert enough willpower, asthma can be overcome; and in a couple of movies, that the character can attack their enemies through asthma, such as using an inhaler as a weapon.

"None of these stereotypes have medical backing," notes Clark, who points out that when asthmatic children experience an attack, time and again remain calm. For instance, children have to convince the teacher that they need to get their inhaler (from the school nurse), all while calmly enduring poor breathing until they obtain relief. "If asthma was so widely psychosomatic, as movies imply, it would not be so pronounced in geographic areas of extreme air pollution," she adds.


http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-06-c ... ovies.html

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PostPosted: Thu Jun 14, 2012 10:05 am 
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Joined: Wed Jun 22, 2011 4:26 pm
Posts: 413
Finally, an article that recognises something I have been upset about for years. Hopefully this will be taken more seriously by the media, as showing this marginalised attitude to kids over and over again can dampen their own self-esteem. Already, too many kids with asthma think they cannot do things because their disease weakens them. We need to change that! This is a step in the right direction. :)

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anaphylaxis to tree nuts and peanuts; asthmatic, dairy intolerant, vegan
other family members allergic to to dairy, egg, peanut, peach, banana, sesame, environmentals


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 14, 2012 1:26 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6476
Location: Ottawa
Yes!

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Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 14, 2012 8:48 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2005 6:39 pm
Posts: 2948
Location: Toronto
I'm only surprised they used so few examples.

The classic was the boy in the wheelchair with asthma on Malcolm in the Middle. Great show, but bad depiction.

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Allergic to soy, peanut, shellfish, penicillin


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 16, 2012 8:00 am 
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Joined: Wed Mar 23, 2005 9:47 am
Posts: 305
Location: Montreal, Canada
It's true for asthma but the same can be said for peanut allergies, if not worse.

I don't know if any of you saw Horribles bosses. The scene were the guy stabs the boss with his Epipen repeatedly in the chest because he's having a reaction was propostrous. It reminded me of Pulp fiction when the character of Uma Turman overdose. Not only is it stupid to use allergies to do someone's harm, but you don't even bother to make it slightly medically acurate. No wonder people are clueless, don't know how to help someone use an Epipen and think that aftet you used it, you are fine and don't need to go to the hospital. Epipen are not used that way. But if you have one, you all aready know that.


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