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PostPosted: Mon Jun 25, 2012 7:39 am 
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Study identifies causes for high rates of allergic reactions in children with food allergies

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Nearly 72 percent of the participants experienced a reaction, with 1,171 allergic reactions in total. Allergic reactions were attributed to such factors as a lack of close supervision, misreading ingredient labels, cross-contamination, or errors in food preparation. Participating families had been given written and verbal food avoidance instruction, and written prescriptions for self-injectable epinephrine, beforehand.

"This study reinforces the importance of educating parents and other caregivers of children with food allergy about avoiding allergenic foods and using epinephrine to treat severe food-allergic reactions," said Scott Sicherer, MD, Professor of Pediatrics and Chief of the Division of Allergy and Immunology at Mount Sinai School of Medicine. "We must work harder to thoroughly educate parents about the details of avoidance and when and how to correctly use epinephrine to manage this life-threatening condition."

Approximately 11 percent of the children experienced anaphylaxis, which can include symptoms such as swelling in the throat, asthma, sudden drop in blood pressure, dizziness or fainting. The children's parents or caregivers administered epinephrine in only 30 percent of the cases of children having severe reactions to food. Investigators found children did not receive epinephrine because either the drug was not available, or parents and caregivers were too afraid to administer the drug, or they did not recognize the reaction as severe and waited to see more symptoms.

"We found a significant number of young children received allergenic foods from caregivers other than their parents," said Hugh Sampson, MD, Dean for Translational Biomedical Sciences, Professor of Pediatrics, and Director of the Jaffe Food Allergy Institute at Mount Sinai School of Medicine. "This underscores the need to educate everyone who is responsible for the child, including grandparents, older siblings and teachers."


http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/ ... 062012.php

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 25, 2012 2:25 pm 
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I saw this similar article, possibly about a different study?

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Even when parents and caregivers are aware of infants' food allergies and have been instructed in avoiding potentially dangerous trigger foods, allergic reactions still occur, the result of both accidental and non-accidental exposures, a study finds.

Accidental exposures from unintentional ingestion, label-reading errors and cross-contamination resulted in 87% of 834 allergic reactions to milk, eggs or peanuts in the study, reported in today's Pediatrics.

Non-accidental exposures resulted in 13% of reactions. It's not clear why caregivers would purposely give a child a known allergen, maybe "to see if (the child) has outgrown an allergy, or how allergic he is," says lead author David Fleischer, a pediatric allergist at National Jewish Health in Denver.

http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/sto ... 55797696/1

The take away is the same.

Quote:
"There is still some misunderstanding in the general public about food allergy and how serious it can be," says Ruchi Gupta, an associate professor of pediatrics at Northwestern University. She led a study published last year that found 8% of U.S. children younger than 18 have a food allergy. About 40% had experienced a life-threatening reaction, such as blocked airways or a drop in blood pressure.

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Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 25, 2012 8:34 pm 
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Location: Kingston
This has more information about the study:

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/247037.php

Quote:
It can be very difficult to avoid common foods, but once the discipline and awareness is in place it ought to become fairly straight forward. With such a high number of allergies around, it's clearly no longer a case where there's only one child, in a school of 500, who represents the awkward exception that has to be handled with kid gloves at meal times. Rather, dairy free, nut free, gluten free and other options should be becoming virtually standard fare.

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