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PostPosted: Sun Dec 29, 2013 7:14 pm 
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Joined: Thu Dec 20, 2007 7:23 pm
Posts: 817
Location: Kingston
Quote:
Allergy anxieties at a Windsor elementary school have forced the cancellation of a peanut butter charity drive for a local charity.

The campaign was cut short at the beginning of December, after a parent raised concerns over the school’s decision to encourage students to donate jars of peanut butter to the local Society of Saint Vincent de Paul, Pamela Baksi, president of the Catholic organization, told the Star Friday.

“Peanut allergies are nothing to joke about and can be very severe or life-threatening,” Baksi said. “We would never want somebody put in peril for something like this.”



http://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2013/12 ... drive.html

My question: If the school Principal was aware of the allergy why would they not have chosen a different food to collect?

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 30, 2013 2:21 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6455
Location: Ottawa
I agree that it's in poor taste to choose pb as the item to collect. That could have been chosen by a business.

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Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 31, 2013 7:26 pm 
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Joined: Thu Dec 20, 2007 7:23 pm
Posts: 817
Location: Kingston
Quote:
Neil MacKenzie, the manager of the nutrition program at the local health unit and a registered dietitian, said the sealed jars of peanut butter kept in the principal’s office presented a very low risk to children with allergies at the school.

“When it comes to allergies, you can’t really live in a bubble,” he said. “People with allergies certainly are aware they have those allergies and they need to take the steps to avoid those allergies in all settings. You don’t want to set up an artificial perimeter for letting your guard down.”



Quote:
Laurie Harada, the executive director of Anaphylaxis Canada, said it’s important not to leap to conclusions without talking to the parent who made the call or knowing the context leading up to it. In general, she said schools should have clear written policies about bringing allergens onto school grounds developed in consultation with students, staff and families.

“I think what’s important to remember for all of us is that it’s about the health and welfare and safety of a child,” Harada said. “But I think we need to have reasonable expectations, reasonable practices, as well.”


Quote:
It’s important not to downplay or dismiss the concerns of people with serious food allergies and their families, Harada said.

“If you’ve never dealt with a child with an allergy that can be life-threatening or you don’t have one yourself, people don’t always understand what it entails to avoid an allergic reaction,” she said. “It’s not just people being fussy about a food.”


http://blogs.windsorstar.com/2013/12/30 ... -concerns/

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