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PostPosted: Tue Apr 18, 2006 12:02 am 
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Joined: Sun Mar 05, 2006 1:05 pm
Posts: 528
Location: Burlington, Ontario
This is from the AAAAI website
http://www.aaaai.org/media/jaci/2006/02/anaphylaxis.stm

Simons – Anaphylaxis, killer allergy: Long-term management in the community
Traditionally, physicians are trained to diagnose and treat anaphylaxis as an acute emergency in a healthcare setting. In addition to this crucial, time-honored role, Dr. Estelle Simons advises in the February 2006 issue of the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology that physicians have wider responsibilities to individuals with anaphylaxis.

These involve: 1) risk-assessment; 2) risk-reduction; and 3) anaphylaxis education. Risk-assessment should include verification of the trigger factor for the anaphylaxis episode, by obtaining a comprehensive history and performing relevant tests. Long-term risk-reduction strategies should be personalized to include information about avoidance of specific triggers, and initiation of relevant specific preventive treatment; for example, venom immunotherapy for anaphylaxis triggered by an insect sting. At-risk individuals should be coached in the use of self-injectable epinephrine, and equipped with an Anaphylaxis Emergency Action Plan and with accurate medical identification. Anaphylaxis education should be provided for these individuals, their families and caregivers, healthcare professionals, and the general public.


I hope this advice is followed someday here in Canada as well, because this has been my complaint: the lack of medical advice after my daughter had her anaphylactic reaction in February. The hospital provided us with the basic, but our appointment at the allergy clinic is only in May! In the meanwhile, I have had to depend entirely on friends in the same situation and websites such as this one for info.

Karen, the moderator, mentioned that she wanted to be an anaphylaxis educator and I am very surprised that there isn't anything of the sort available out there. Big gap in the healthcare system.

[Edited by moderator to correct URL]


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 18, 2006 12:39 am 
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Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
Thanks Nicole. This is still a dream of mine....

I agree that there is an extreme gap between diagnosis and management.

K.

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2006 10:51 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 6:53 pm
Posts: 1454
Location: Canada
Yep, there's a big gap. I guess the problem is: how do doctors manage to convey sufficient info. in 10-12 minute appointments (which is the standard here in Canada).

Our medical system doesn't deal so well with chronic health problems that are complicated.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 27, 2006 6:10 pm 
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Joined: Sun Mar 05, 2006 1:05 pm
Posts: 528
Location: Burlington, Ontario
I have a friend whose son has ADHD and there is all sorts of professional councelling available for that. When people have diabetes, they meet with a dietitician, they are followed very closely.

I think I will buy reference books on allergies and try to submit the bill to our insurance company, since there is no form of councelling available. :lol:

Kidding aside, I think I will mention it to the allergist when we visit.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 27, 2006 9:00 pm 
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Joined: Wed Apr 27, 2005 11:20 am
Posts: 122
Reference books have been so essential to me in helping to navigate my allergies. I do visit a dietician regularily and although her knowledge on allergies is limited, I at least feel that she works with me to find safe alternatives and new suggestions on meal items.

This forum and Allergic Living magazine have been the 2 greatest knowlege sources for me. Sharing my experiences and hearing those of others helps me to know that I"m not alone.


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