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 Post subject: Asthma meds at school
PostPosted: Tue Jun 20, 2006 10:11 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
I've been thinking about what to do with my youngest's asthma meds when he starts school in September. He is severely allergic to milk/eggs/peanuts, and asthmatic.

He will always wear his EpiPen on him. However, since his asthma is well controlled (an ongoing challenge but we are very vigilant), and it's unlikely that he will need the asthma meds RIGHT AWAY when outside (see next paragraph), I'm leaning towards having his asthma meds left in a noticeable place in the classroom when he's out in the schoolyard at recess.

I mean, if he's in the schoolyard and having such a hard time breathing that he needs emergency medication, I want them to go for the EpiPen first anyway.

What do the rest of you do with your kids who have severe allergies and asthma? Am I out in left field with my gameplan? I don't want my 5-year-old to have to haul around a medicine chest, and I'd rather they all know where his asthma meds are rather than having the meds move around with a schoolyard monitor and potentially get misplaced.

K.

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Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jun 20, 2006 10:47 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6467
Location: Ottawa
Most kids wear a bakcpack nowadays. Our daughter keeps her asthma medication and her aerochamber in her fannypack in the backpack. I've known parents who take the fannypack to the shoe-repair and get a snap placed in the strap to make t smal enough for kids to wear. I'm not that organised.

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Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2006 3:14 pm 
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Joined: Wed Aug 03, 2005 2:01 pm
Posts: 38
Location: Ontario
My wee man wore his epibelt to school daily this school year. His asthma medication was in the backpack left at the sitters. (She is on the emergency call list). If he was having a hard time breathing in the am, I made sure he used his puffers before I dropped him off at the sitters. However, he was only attending school for half-day in the am (which is usually a better breathing time) and was picked up off bus by sitter at 11:30am - so really, he was without the puffers for less than 3 hours. Personally, I am not entirely comfortable with the "action plan" the school came up with, but he is only there 2 hours or so, and he takes (and eats) only the snack I pack. I'm thinking I will be more nervous when he is there for all day and lunch in grade 1.

Understandably, it is difficult to let them leave our "safety bubble", and give the responsibility of their well-being to someone else, but some of our options are limited. I am very comfortable leaving him with his sitter as she is very familiar with asthma & anaphylaxis. I work less than 10 minutes (in traffic) from the school in the event of emergency.

The only problem I had in the past year, was the crazy Jr Kindergarten teacher had the kids decorate hard boiled eggs for easter. We didn't participate - my wee man spent the day with grandma instead decorating wooden easter eggs.

:wink:
Buzimom_2000 mom of 4 boys, 13, 11,10 with no allergies &
5yr old allergic to eggs, peanuts, asthma, insect bites


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2006 9:37 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
I know what you mean - he's been with a very good daycare that takes his allergies and asthma very seriously, and I'm just nervous about him moving to a larger environment where there will, by virtue of the number of kids per class and such, be less attention paid to him as an individual. He's a mature little guy, but he'll still only be 5/6!

He will have a backpack and I think we will be leaving his asthma stuff in there, so that everyone knows it's there. And I think we will be using the "calendar notebook" that each child gets to pass notes back and forth between us and the teacher (in case one of us has to tell the other about any asthma symptoms, etc.).

I just wanted to see what others do. I survived the start of school with my oldest, but my youngest's allergies are more challenging and he is asthmatic, so I worry more.

K.

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2006 9:54 pm 
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Joined: Fri Jan 06, 2006 8:22 pm
Posts: 154
Location: Georgia
Karen,

Do y'all do an allergy action plan? What is in place at the school regarding allergy/asthma provisions?

Daisy


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jun 22, 2006 1:00 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
Oh yes, it'll all be there - allergy/asthma plan, etc. At this school, things are done on a class-by-class basis, and I have to talk to the teacher between now and the start of school to make sure everything is in place. The nurse (who is there one day a week, and not always for a full day) will also be giving EpiPen training, and she will also be talking to the teachers with allergic kid in their class separately.

But I still worry that just because it's on paper, doesn't mean that it'll happen. A teacher with 20-25 kids in one class might not notice if he's not feeling great. And I'm starting to notice how often we have to give special instructions to my son's daycare teachers this year with regards to his asthma, and I worry that these instructions won't be listened to next year or will get lost in the shuffle.

I think I am driving myself a little crazy, actually, and perhaps borrowing trouble. The school year won't start for another 3 months. As my husband says, I think too much. :?

Sigh.

K.

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jun 23, 2006 2:27 pm 
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Joined: Wed Aug 10, 2005 11:21 am
Posts: 687
Location: Cobourg, ON
My daughter's asthma is also well controlled and we rarely have to use the blue puffer - only if she has a cold. She is in jk this year. We did not have her carry her puffer this year. We actually didn't even send it to school. Maybe we will next year just to be safe. Her asthma has never really been very serious except during colds. We also felt that if she was in distress that the epipen should be used first also. We did not want to overwhelm the teacher without reason and my husband works minutes away from her and our home is only a few minutes away from school to pick up a puffer.

We did tell the teacher to inform us if she noticed in change in her ability to participate in gym or recess. Everything has been fine. She only attends every other day in kindergarten and her school is air conditioned so pollens are limited inside and the smog is kept out also. Next year, I am going to be teaching at her school so I will be able to administer the puffer if needed and keep her inside with me on bad air days. I hope it will work out okay being at her school. We have good relations with the admin and the staff so hopefully it will be a smooth transition in the fall.

_________________
13 year old daughter -- lives with life-threatening allergies to milk, tree nuts and peanuts; seasonal allergies (birch, maple, ragweed); pet allergies; asthma; and eczema
10 year old son - no allergies


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 09, 2006 11:37 pm 
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Joined: Wed Aug 09, 2006 11:22 pm
Posts: 1
Location: Ontario, Canada
Wow, I have to say that I'm quite impressed by the responsible and informed attitude you all have represented here. I'm now 24, and have lived with severe asthma, and anaphylaxis (peanuts/nuts/shellfish, food-induced exercise anaphylaxis, other allergies to kiwi, onion) all my life. When I was in elementary school, not only were schools, parents, and peers completely ignorant about allergies and asthma, they often expressed contempt towards me as a result of their lack of understanding. I've been quite happy to witness the evolution in attitude and awareness. Since I could not really rely on anyone when I was a student, I always carried my asthma meds with me wherever I went. Yes, it was a burden in some ways, and I did get mercilessly teased at times, but ultimately I felt more secure knowing that I was in control of my own physical well-being. This was quite empowering, even at a young age. Such hardships have shaped the person I am, and every challenge I have faced has only made me stronger. And along the way, there was the occasional kind face, and understanding voice that further emboldened me to take charge of my health. Based on my personal experiences, I would think it ideal to have a young child carry both a puffer and epipen on his/her person at all times, but also have a spare located centrally (with the student's teacher or in the principal's office at school for instance). All teachers and staff, including lunchtime monitors and volunteers can be informed of the storage location of these spare meds, and can be shown by the parents how to administer them in case of emergency. Should the unthinkable happen and your child is unable to use his/her medication, there is extra medication accessible to any adult on-scene. This "redundancy plan" can help improve response time and can also offer parents a little bit more peace of mind. We can teach our children how to recognize symptoms, how to administer their own puffers and/or epipens, but there is always that chance that for some reason they may not have direct access to said medication or are too incapacitated to self-adminster. Although this takes extra-time, effort, and may even present an added financial burden (having to purchase spares for "storage" at school, babysitter's, summer camp, etc.), I have no doubt that you would all go to the end of the earth to do whatever you can to ease your child's journey. I admire you all greatly.

Best wishes,

Christine

**hope this helped!

:)

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Nous recherchons la connaissance profonde


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Aug 10, 2006 11:30 am 
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Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
Thanks Christine.

First, let me say that you sound like a really mature person, and bravo to have hung in there and cared enough about yourself to have taken the precautions that you did when you were younger, despite teasing and uncaring or contemptive attitudes. (That's so sad that you had to go through that though... :( )

Second... It does help. :)

Rather than feeling like I'm "over-reacting", it makes me feel like I am simply taking steps to make sure that my child will get the care he needs if/when the time comes. And hopefully making him feel like someone is looking out for him, rather than treating him with contempt or indifference.

THANKS!!
K.

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


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