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 Post subject: Meeting At School
PostPosted: Fri Sep 01, 2006 12:02 pm 
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Joined: Thu Jun 29, 2006 10:21 am
Posts: 64
Location: Mississauga
Hi Everybody,

I just finished a meeting with my daughter's prinicpal and I have to say that at the end of it, I felt very at ease and relived. She was so allergy aware. She also said that all the staff will be getting retrained this month. :D

They gave us the choice of having her carry the epipen with her or to leave it in a room that they have specifically for them. They are kept unlocked and she said there is ALWAYS someone in the office.

No treats are to be brought in for birthdays, instead they have requested book donations.

Anyway, I just wanted to let everyone know. What a difference from last year. This totally made my day! :)

Take care,

_________________
7 year old daughter-Allergic to Peanuts/Nuts
6 year old son-No allergies
4 year old daughter-No allergies


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Sep 02, 2006 10:10 am 
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Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
I'm so glad Carla! It makes a big difference to your peace of mind, doesn't it?

We live in Quebec, so don't have Sabrina's Law to force the issues, but I have to say that our school has come a long way too. When my oldest started kindergarten 3 years ago, we were told that there was no anaphylaxis policy (except there was - just no one knew about it) and that perhaps my son would be better off at the peanut-free school in another neighborhood. :shock: Even last year I had to call the school board to force the principal to send home the letter that she was required as per the policy (which I had since uncovered) to inform the other parents that there was a peanut-allergic child in the class.

This year there is a new principal who is much more allergy aware, and our beloved school nurse (an ally) is also finally getting through to everyone. My youngest just started kindergarten, and things are definitely much improved since 3 years ago. Even if it were the same principal as the previous years (who was pretty horrendous), I think things would be better.

K.

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


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 Post subject: meeting at school
PostPosted: Wed Sep 06, 2006 1:59 pm 
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Joined: Wed Aug 30, 2006 2:30 pm
Posts: 41
Location: barrie, Ontario
In contrast the school hasn't contacted us yet and when I went to pick up my daughter from school yesterday I asked the teacher to meet with me at her convenience to discuss a plan she had no idea that my daughter was even allergic to anything!!!! I filled out and handed in the medical form over a week ago.........she wore her medicalert braclet all day so even that should have alerted the teacher you would think?

I hope someone contacts me soon :?

_________________
luvmikids

daughter allergic to dairy,eggs,peanuts, soy, intolerance for potatoes, whole wheat


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Sep 06, 2006 2:19 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
I wouldn't wait. I would call the school again and request a meeting, emphasizing that you have a child at risk. Definitely go and have a chat with the teacher as soon as possible.

We had to be very proactive at our school. If I hadn't called and gone in person multiple times, we never would have had a meeting with the school.

At one point in late August I had left a message for the VP on her voicemail to arrange our big meeting about my youngest. When she didn't respond (within 2 days), I went in to the school to "drop something off" but really to track her down. Turns out she'd been transferred to another school!! What would have happened if I hadn't followed up? I'd still be waiting!

Schools are insanely busy at the start of the year and I'm sure lots of things fall through the cracks. So it's up to us as parents of kids at risk to follow up.

The more they see you and hear from you, the more they will remember you and your child. For me, that has been very effective. But it has taken effort on my part and one-on-one time with the powers that be. :)

K.

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Sep 06, 2006 4:39 pm 
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Joined: Thu Jun 29, 2006 10:21 am
Posts: 64
Location: Mississauga
I agree with Karen. Even though I had spoken with the principal, on the first day of school before class started I also went and spoke to her teacher to make sure she had been told about my daughter's allergy.

Also, last year whenever I noticed she had a supply teacher, I also spoke to him/her at the start of class and made sure they knew as well. :)

_________________
7 year old daughter-Allergic to Peanuts/Nuts
6 year old son-No allergies
4 year old daughter-No allergies


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Sep 06, 2006 10:26 pm 
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Site Admin

Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6429
Location: Ottawa
luvmikids-Please contact the school tomorrow to arrange for a meeting with the principal and the teacher to review their policy. Sabrina's Law means they must have a policy. You have a right to know what they plan to do regarding snacks, celebrations, fieldtrips, school yard clean-up, replacement staff and lesson plans. You need to complete forms so that they can track and store medications, ensure that they have been trained on how and when to administer the medication and that they know what to be alert for.
I hope you make some head way!

_________________
Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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 Post subject: on the flip side
PostPosted: Fri Sep 08, 2006 10:28 am 
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Joined: Wed Jul 26, 2006 1:56 pm
Posts: 86
Location: Kanata, Ontario
on the flip side


Had two families register their kids and when they dropped them off on the first day, casually mentionned that oh yah - they have nut allergies and egg allergies and milk allergies!

As both a parent and a teacher I was appalled at how little concern they had to let us know these things!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Sep 08, 2006 10:52 am 
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Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 9:38 pm
Posts: 1643
Location: Toronto
stefteach, I have a few friends like that. One I completely understand -- based on her child's history. The other, even the doctor has said that it appears his reactions are getting worse and will probably become anaphylactic with repeated exposure. Yet, it took her months to decide not to have pb in the house. (She often forgets and brings it in.) Baffles my mind.

Regarding school, I spoke with my son's teacher the first day before school - but just briefly. Basically, told her he wears an epi-pen and has an extra in the office; benedryl is usually all he needs; he's allergic to insects NOT peanuts. (I'm not trying to be nasty, but teacher's often assume it's a peanut allergy and don't seem to hear me unless I clearly specify NOT peanuts.)

Anyway, I'm going to arrange a meeting with her soon - before the first field trip. Two years ago I went to the principal with a request for my son with regards to field trips. She felt my request was reasonable - and was shocked it wasn't already school policy. Now, I just want to make sure his teacher is aware of this policy. I'm also going to volunteer 1/2 day a week, and let her know I'm available for most trips.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Sep 08, 2006 6:16 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jul 26, 2006 1:56 pm
Posts: 86
Location: Kanata, Ontario
I've got to say, allergies or not, the best policy with regards to a teacher is communicate, be visible and smile!
It makes everyone's lives so much easier!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 10:20 am 
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Joined: Tue Sep 12, 2006 9:53 am
Posts: 4
Location: Fredericton, NB
I'm glad your school is being supportive, Carla. My son started kindergarten last week and our school has been excellent too. They do not allow peanuts or nuts at school, and while they do allow children to bring in birthday treats, my son keep s peanut free Chapman's ice cream bars in the freezer so he can have something safe.

_________________
Heidi
SAHM to 2 boys, ages 5 (anaphylactic to peanuts) and 1


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 9:27 pm 
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Joined: Tue Sep 12, 2006 8:25 pm
Posts: 233
Location: Winnipeg
Our school is also very supportive, but it is a work in progress. We had decided that my sons' (twins in the same class) epipens would be kept on a special hook by their classroom door, and that the classroom door would always be unlocked, and that the teacher would be responsible for carrying the pouches to the gym, on field trips etc. They are six, and very "high-spirited" little boys, I and their teacher had concerns about whether they were mature enough to be responsible for carrying their own meds at this point.
However this left me very concerned about what was to happen at recess. The teacher assured me that all the recess supervisors would be made aware of who my sons are and their allergies, as well as where to find the epipens. I didn't feel really great about this plan, but wasn't quite sure what alternative to suggest.
Well the other day, one of my sons had a problem with his pants, the pesky things wouldn't stay up properly, and went to find a teacher or supervisor to help him. It took him almost all of recess to find someone to ask for help, approximately 10-15 minutes. What if his problem had been an allergic reaction, not just loose pants????? How long would it have taken him to get help??? What shape would he have been in at that point? How long until his epipen was located, and administered? 911 called?
Needless to say I will be going in to the school for a meeting tomorrow. That's just insanely dangerous. I am mad at myself for not pushing for a better solution to a plan that I knew wasn't good enough when I heard it in the first place.

_________________
1 son allergic to eggs, peanuts, green peas, chick peas, lentils and tomatoes
(avoiding tree nuts and most other legumes too)
1 son allergic to eggs, and has outgrown peanuts
Both with many environmental allergies, asthma and eczema


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 10:25 pm 
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Joined: Wed Aug 10, 2005 11:21 am
Posts: 684
Location: Cobourg, ON
At many schools in my community, yard supervisors wear orange flourescent (is that spelled right?) vests to help child identify adults.

_________________
11 year old daughter -- lives with life-threatening allergies to milk, eggs and peanuts; seasonal allergies (birch, maple, ragweed); pet allergies; asthma; and eczema
9 year old son - no allergies


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Sep 12, 2006 10:43 pm 
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Joined: Sat Apr 16, 2005 12:09 am
Posts: 1054
So happy for you Carla! Reading your post makes me feel a little better about sending my son off to school next year - I hope I will be as fortunate! Can you explain the book donation thing - I'm not sure I understand...
katec - great idea about the flourescent vests on school yard personelle.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Sep 13, 2006 12:42 am 
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Joined: Thu Jun 29, 2006 10:21 am
Posts: 64
Location: Mississauga
Ethansmom, book donation is being used this year to deter parents from sending in cake or treats etc. for their child's birthday they are being asked to donate a book for the library which they put a little plaque with your child's name in it stating "donated by ,,,,,,",

My son(no allergies, just found out :D ) just started JK this year and his birthday is at the end of the month. So I thought instead of us donating a book, I thought it would be great to donate the video from Anaphylaxis Canada called "Alexander the Elephant Who Couldn't Eat Peanuts". I have purchased this video for us at home and my daughter watches it over and over again. It talks about all food allergies not just peanuts(like fish and milk allergy etc.). At the end of the video they have interviews with children and they discuss how they feel going to school and living with allergies. Because her school has many children with different allergies(not just peanuts/nuts) I thought it would be great.

Take care,

_________________
7 year old daughter-Allergic to Peanuts/Nuts
6 year old son-No allergies
4 year old daughter-No allergies


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Sep 13, 2006 9:29 am 
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Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 9:38 pm
Posts: 1643
Location: Toronto
twinmom, I have found when going in to the school with a concern about how things are currently done, it is best to have a new plan in my mind (when possible).

Schools are often concerned that if a small child is carrying their epi-pen themselves they will play with it and someone could get injured. I do understand that concern, as I'm sure most parents of fa kids do -- so you need a plan that also covers that.

There are a lot of threads on this forum about epi-pen carriers.

My son has been carrying his own epi-pen since he was in jk -- in this:

http://www.medicalert.ca/en/products/mini/C100.html

The pen cannot fall out. It is strong enough to withstand up to 1000 lbs of outside pressure (so no risk when my son flies into the playscape). He is now in grade 3 and his pen has never been taken out of the belt at school. In an emergency is it right there with him, and easy to open -- pull one velcro strap. This thing has withstood the playscape, sandbox, slip & slide, and a quick dunk in the Atlantic Ocean (not recommended, but the pen stayed dry and I was happy :) ).

Anyway, this is my personal choice for young kids -- other people prefer some other carriers. The important thing is, find something you feel safe with, that fits a child and fits a child's life.

********

Years ago my friend agreed to keeping her son's epi-pen hanging in the front of the classroom in a back pack. One day one of his classmates snuck it out of the bag and took it into the school yard. He was playing around and injected himself with it. After that incident the school finally agreed to her son carrying his own epi-pen.


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