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Does your child's school have a school nurse?
part-time 33%  33%  [ 4 ]
full-time 8%  8%  [ 1 ]
not at all 58%  58%  [ 7 ]
Total votes : 12
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 Post subject: School Nurses
PostPosted: Fri Sep 08, 2006 2:48 pm 
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Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 9:38 pm
Posts: 1643
Location: Toronto
I didn't think any schools in Canada had school nurses, but today I read two separate posts (different provinces) referring to a school nurse.

I'm in Ontario - no school nurse at my son's school.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Sep 08, 2006 2:55 pm 
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Joined: Thu Sep 22, 2005 11:39 pm
Posts: 1141
Location: saskatchewan, canada
I did not vote because we are not in school. But no nurse at the school we looked into. I do not think there are any nurses at any school in our city.

_________________
DD age 9 1/2 -peanuts, nuts,
DD age 7 1/2 - milk, eggs, chicken, peanuts, treenuts, cats, dogs,
DS age 2 1/2
Husband- asthma, eggs, treenuts, fish, shellfish environmental
Self - penicillan, eurithromiacin, mild laytex allergy.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Sep 08, 2006 3:55 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
In Quebec there are CLSC (loose translation: community health care centre) nurses who are attached to the schools. For example, our nurse is based out of the CLSC but her full-time job is to work with the schools. I believe she has 5 schools that she is responsible for, so she spends one day a week (sometimes less) at each school.

I have to say, it's not perfect, but our particular nurse, who's starting her 3rd year with our school, is awesome, takes allergies very seriously, and I am so grateful to have her as an ally. She is the person who has been providing the anaphylaxis/auto-injector training at our school and helped us develop our anaphylaxis/asthma action plan this year for our youngest, based on the recommendations of our allergist.

It's sad that nurses aren't allowed to play a larger role with schools, because there are so many health issues (not just allergies) that require their consistent input and presence. In my humble opinion.

K.

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Sep 08, 2006 6:21 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jul 26, 2006 1:56 pm
Posts: 86
Location: Kanata, Ontario
We have a special needs child in our school who requires specific medical interventions on a regular basis and so a full time nurse is assigned. She does not, howevere, minister to the general population, although I suppose in an emergency she might help... I will have to ask her Monday.
What a shame that that was a 'frill' lost in cost cutting!

In Ontario, despite the passing of Sabrina's Law, Ontario Public Health nurses were not given time/funds to re train teacher this year in epi pen adminisatration. A parent, who is a nurse, volunteered as our VP felt it was essential.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Sep 08, 2006 8:40 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jun 19, 2006 11:58 pm
Posts: 275
Location: on my pc in cp
i know when i was in school there were no nurses assigned to the school, they'd come in once in a while to administer manditory shots, and in high school we had a sexual health nurse in once a week who worked out of the guidance office but that's about the extent of it

i'm in ontario as well

_________________
allergies - penicillin, benadryl, dust mites, enviornmental & chemical
conditions - dermatographism, eczema, well contorolled asthma
dietary - lactose intollerant, vegatarian


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Sep 08, 2006 9:07 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
stefteach wrote:
In Ontario, despite the passing of Sabrina's Law, Ontario Public Health nurses were not given time/funds to re train teacher this year in epi pen adminisatration. A parent, who is a nurse, volunteered as our VP felt it was essential.


Unfortunately anaphylaxis is not a mandated program for Ontario public health, so if a given city doesn't have the funds, they can choose not to have their public health unit focus on anaphylaxis. This is what has happened in Ottawa this year and It's very short-sighted in my opinion.

K.

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Sep 08, 2006 9:43 pm 
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Site Admin

Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6429
Location: Ottawa
I work for a nursing agency and we are one of a few who have a contract with the Ontario Government (Community Care Access Centre) to supply RN's and RNA with Meds to students to allow them to attend school.

http://www.ottawa.ccac-ont.ca/clients_f ... sp?page=39

As far as I know these are the only nurses at schools and they are there for specific students.

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Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Sep 09, 2006 10:19 pm 
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Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 9:38 pm
Posts: 1643
Location: Toronto
KarenOASG wrote:
stefteach wrote:
In Ontario, despite the passing of Sabrina's Law, Ontario Public Health nurses were not given time/funds to re train teacher this year in epi pen adminisatration. A parent, who is a nurse, volunteered as our VP felt it was essential.


Unfortunately anaphylaxis is not a mandated program for Ontario public health, so if a given city doesn't have the funds, they can choose not to have their public health unit focus on anaphylaxis. This is what has happened in Ottawa this year and It's very short-sighted in my opinion.

K.


I guess I'm quite fortunate. Although my son's school does not have a nurse, I don't feel it's a requirement for him. The principal insists that all staff be fully trained on how/when to use an epi-pen. She previously had a student in ana. shock and wants to be fully prepared if it ever happens again.

Also, my son is licenced to teach people how to use epi-pens. He had offered to go and train the staff at my son's school if it was needed. Normally he charges (it's a part-time job teaching firstaid/CPR) but he was willing to do this for his little brother (just the epi part of the course) at no charge.


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