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 Post subject: Our new board policy
PostPosted: Sat May 12, 2007 8:43 pm 
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Joined: Wed Aug 10, 2005 11:21 am
Posts: 687
Location: Cobourg, ON
Here is a link to our new board anaphylaxis policy. I was a member of the committee that reviewed and revised our old policy. We were very fortunate to have the help of Marilyn Allen of Anaphylaxis Canada also. Quaker in Peterborough sponsored the training manual which is being used by principals to train all staff. I am pleased with our policy. The only problem we are still running into is the training of supply teachers. It is left up to principals on the day that they arrive to teach. One more battle to fight yet!!!

http://www.pvnccdsb.on.ca/library/polic ... ylaxis.pdf

_________________
13 year old daughter -- lives with life-threatening allergies to milk, tree nuts and peanuts; seasonal allergies (birch, maple, ragweed); pet allergies; asthma; and eczema
10 year old son - no allergies


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat May 12, 2007 9:05 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6471
Location: Ottawa
Regarding supply teachers hired by the school board:
Seeing as the school board is responsible under Bill 3 to provide
Quote:
regular training on dealing with life-threatening allergies for all employees and others who are in direct contact with pupils on a regular basis.

Does it not follow that all supply teachers would be given an annual training on anaphylaxic reaction and autoinjector training? Could they not be given access to a copy of each schools policy (I would imagine that they could download this from the school board website) and advised to report to the school Principal when assigned to a class so they could be given any further information regarding students in that class who have allergies.
I would love to see a poster with the pictures of all allergic students posted by the photocopier as that is one place you tend to stand for a while and you could absorb the info easily. Also those parents who volunteer often do photocopying and it would be a chance for them to get the info one more time.

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Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun May 13, 2007 10:45 pm 
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Joined: Wed Aug 10, 2005 11:21 am
Posts: 687
Location: Cobourg, ON
The response from our superintendent about training for supply teachers was that it would be impossible to ensure that all had training since the list is changed several times a year. Instead the board has directed supply teachers to refer to the internet training site set up by the ministry of education. However, many supply teachers have arrived at school and have not viewed the site. It is difficult to require the principal to be the main trainer also because in our board prinicipals can be out of the school 1 -2 days a week for meetings. We need to pursue this further with our board.

_________________
13 year old daughter -- lives with life-threatening allergies to milk, tree nuts and peanuts; seasonal allergies (birch, maple, ragweed); pet allergies; asthma; and eczema
10 year old son - no allergies


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon May 14, 2007 10:32 am 
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Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 9:38 pm
Posts: 1643
Location: Toronto
_Susan_ wrote:
I would love to see a poster with the pictures of all allergic students posted by the photocopier as that is one place you tend to stand for a while and you could absorb the info easily. Also those parents who volunteer often do photocopying and it would be a chance for them to get the info one more time.


That crosses with confidentiality rules. I know that some schools do put up pictures of kids with LFA, but the principal at my son's school is adamant that medical information is confidential. (It is.) So, I make sure EVERYONE knows about my son's allergy. ;)

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self: allergy to sesame seeds and peanuts
3 sons each with at least one of the following allergies: peniciilin, sulfa-based antibiotic, latex, insect bites/stings


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon May 14, 2007 6:41 pm 
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Site Admin

Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6471
Location: Ottawa
Yes, health information is a matter for confidentiality but the school has a duty to diseminate information to all employees, students and parents.
How much information is too much information? How much is necessary to save a life? Do the parents who volunteer in the classroom need to know who has an allergy and to what?

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Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon May 14, 2007 8:32 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
(A bit of background: We are really fortunate there is a very well-run daycare system within my sons' school, and most of the kids in the school are enrolled in the daycare before and after school, and are watched by daycare teachers at lunch. The adult supervision is awesome.)

For my youngest (in kindergarten), the first time there was a supply teacher, I went to the VP and asked if the teacher had been informed about my son and his allergies and asthma and been trained to use an EpiPen. The VP looked very concerned as she realized the implications, and went right away and did this.

They then decided that from that point on, they would use one of the in-school daycare teachers as the supply teacher for my son's class, and it would always be the same daycare teacher. I have to say, I would never have thought of that. It's ingenious, really.

I realize that this is a very special set of circumstances and that we are very fortunate to have such a set-up (and a school that cares enough to take these extra steps), but for anyone whose school has in-school daycare, you could consider enquiring if that could be done. That way it's always the same supply teacher, and they have been trained on how to use the auto-injector.

K.

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed May 23, 2007 7:56 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 07, 2006 6:40 am
Posts: 50
Location: Victoria
Check with the three teacher federations in Ontario. I can't recall which one of the three it was but when I called them they spoke of supply teachers in relation to training. They had only recently worked on changing policy of some sort so that supply teachers would be paid on a pro-d day each year to have this training. Sorry I can't remember which federation it was.


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