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PostPosted: Wed Aug 29, 2007 12:32 pm 
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Joined: Tue Sep 12, 2006 8:25 pm
Posts: 233
Location: Winnipeg
Our sons' school is already "peanut/nut free", but I'm unsure of how exactly to approach the egg issue this year. I would like any celebration foods shared by the whole class to be egg free, and I don't want anything with egg as a major ingredient, or that has a spillable/ smearable consistency in the class (i.e. hard boiled eggs, egg salad, mayo, meringue). But I would rather not ask the other families to avoid egg in their child's lunches and snack altogether. I don't think that there is a great risk of transferring the egg proteins in a dry cracker, cookie or piece of bread or from a may contain food, at this age (grade 2). But I don't know how to word this without being confusing? Or diluting the message about the seriousness of the allergy? Will allowing a little make people think that avoiding the high risk items doesn't really matter?
Last year we just opted for just asking that the classroom be egg free, but I know that it does create a burden on the 50 or so families affected by their 2 classroom.

_________________
1 son allergic to eggs, peanuts, green peas, chick peas, lentils and tomatoes
(avoiding tree nuts and most other legumes too)
1 son allergic to eggs, and has outgrown peanuts
Both with many environmental allergies, asthma and eczema


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 29, 2007 12:56 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6468
Location: Ottawa
I would start off by stating that I was not asking for a total ban of eggs in the classroom and point out that certain foods are more likely to be spread then others.
I would specify which foods I was concerned about.
I personally am not so worried about the egg as I am the milk (think cheese powder, greasy pizzas etc.)
Good luck, we meet with our new principal tomorrow.

_________________
Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 29, 2007 5:06 pm 
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Joined: Tue Sep 12, 2006 8:25 pm
Posts: 233
Location: Winnipeg
Good luck to you too! Milk would have to be one of the hardest ones to deal with for a little kid (probably THE hardest)! Egg is the big one for us, since one son in particular is extremely contact reactive to it.
This is what I have so far (bear in mind this part of the copy directed at the school admin, from which they will write their letter to the other parents):

-classmates will be asked to refrain from bringing peanuts/ peanut products and foods which contain eggs as a major ingredient or that can easily be transferred (spilled or
smeared on books, doorknobs, faucets etc.), such as the following:
eggs (including hard boiled eggs and egg salad sandwiches)
mayonaise or miracle whip
salad dressings, frostings, puddings or any sauce which contains eggs
marshmallow fluff
meringue
egg nog

Please note: that "dry" breads, crackers, cookies and baked goods, and things that are labeled as "may contain eggs" pose a much lower risk of causing a contact reaction, because the egg protein in them is not as easily transferred to hands and other objects within the classroom.

-celebration foods to be shared with the class (whether homemade or store bought) should be free from eggs and peanuts, and processed foods should not be labeled as "may contain" or "made in a plant that also processes" eggs or peanuts. Homemade treats without eggs or peanuts will make the classroom environment much safer, but he will not be able to share them, because of cross contamination risks. He can share a packaged treat if it is included on his safe list and the teacher has double checked the ingredient label. I am happy to provide safe lists, and recipes to help other parents with safe choices for special occasions.


Is that reasonably clear? Have I forgotten any of the usual eggy things that kids would bring to school? And is egg nog too much of a stretch? I've never heard of a kid having it in their lunch, but I keep picturing someone bringing it in at Christmas if I leave it off! All help and suggestions are much appreciated, because I somehow lost my file with the last 2 years allergy info, and I'm starting from scratch for this year! :roll:

_________________
1 son allergic to eggs, peanuts, green peas, chick peas, lentils and tomatoes
(avoiding tree nuts and most other legumes too)
1 son allergic to eggs, and has outgrown peanuts
Both with many environmental allergies, asthma and eczema


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 31, 2007 12:14 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
I think that sounds good, myself. I see no reason why you shouldn't include egg nog - just in case!

I think stressing that you are trying to "reduce the risk" is important, while pointing out that you realize you cannot completely eliminate the risk. I think that gets the message across that you are trying to find a happy medium.

K.

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 31, 2007 1:16 pm 
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Joined: Mon Apr 09, 2007 3:29 pm
Posts: 192
Location: Ohio
Just for FYI My two little girls love egg nogg and I know if they went to school (we homeschool) they would ask for it in their lunch. We purchase it year aroud. Now I know my girls are strange but just I would let you know. :)

We had a little boy in our homeschool co-op that had those allergies and the mother had a box of wipes at each end of the cafateria and the kids got into the habit of wiping their hands before leaving the lunch area. She ate in another part of the building. I know is not practicle eating somwhere else for school but you might want to provide the teacher with wipes for the class room for the kids to wipe hands before entering after lunch. Just a thought its been a long time since I have even delt with a school that I am not sure how practicle it is.

_________________
Karen in Ohio mom of 7
Allergic to tons and tons of food as well as perfumes, scented air sprays and cleaners. Hubby to Fish, ds #2 Shellfish, youngest to Eggplant, potato, Caesin, Raw Tomato & spinach.


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 10, 2007 10:23 am 
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Joined: Tue Sep 12, 2006 8:25 pm
Posts: 233
Location: Winnipeg
Thanks for the feedback.

The school had already sent out a letter asking for eggs to be avoided entirely. I'm glad they're so efficient. I'm still not used to being part of a school system with such strong anaphylaxis policies (I used to have to do everything myself in Alberta, and negotiate each safety measure with the school admin and teachers). So we decided to just leave it as is for now.

_________________
1 son allergic to eggs, peanuts, green peas, chick peas, lentils and tomatoes
(avoiding tree nuts and most other legumes too)
1 son allergic to eggs, and has outgrown peanuts
Both with many environmental allergies, asthma and eczema


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