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PostPosted: Sun Sep 23, 2007 10:50 am 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
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Location: Ottawa
Wah! I was trying to move this thread to the School topics but I completely deleted it! :oops:

Luckily I saved it in Word before I tried it as I was a little unsure...
Sorry, Cynthia! Lol, I miss you Karen.

My allergist reccomends my 4 year old not carry his epi pen at school. As he cannot recognize symptoms and treat himself. He feels an adult should be resposible, this way the pen should not get lost nor will there be an accident from curious little ones who might play with it. I have gotten a lot of flack from the school and have found out that my child has been outside without his pen and under the supervision of adults who do not know of his allergy. (not just once but consistantly for 3 weeks) Does anyone else have their young ones not carry their pen? The school does not check lunches (he is there all day) and a volunteer monitor supervises the lunch and cleans the tables. This person does not require any education in child care or allergies, just a police check. This person also watches the children outside for an hour Being new to this school situation I am baffled, we have removed our child from the situation and I will not be able to work until this environment changes. Am I asking too much from the school? They feel I am too demanding to want the kids to have a consistant monitor who has had some training in allergy synptoms and giving the epipen. These children also are not required to wash their hands at any time.
We are frightened to send our child to school!
_________________
Mom with 4 yr old peanut allergy

_______________________________________________

This is a good question and I am going to move this post to the School thread so that others can comment on it. :)

____________________________


I do not expect my child at 4, 5 or 6 to self inject but I do expect the medication to be available immediately as seconds count during an anaphylaxis reaction. My daughter wears an E-belt at school and has since she started JK when she was still 3. It contains an Epi-Pen (there are others which can contain more than one. She knows what it is and why it is there and she has played with the trainer so she is not really very interested in this one.

I expect anyone who is assuming the role of supervision to assume the responsibility that goes with it and that includes knowing how to protect my child. That means they need to know how to give an Epi-Pen and when. The how is pretty simple. A trainer is a necessity to train and remind others on how to use the auto injector.

Trainers for the Epi-Pen are available for free now as Twinject offers theirs for free. Gotta love a little healthy competition!

http://www.epipen.com/default.aspx
You have to subscribe to their CAS program and go to Tools & Education

http://twinject.ca/en/accessories.php

I don't think you're too demanding to want to protect your child. I'm not sure where you live but here in Ontario we have Sabrina's Law to help us.

Have you made your concerns known and asked them how they plan to address them?
I am a bit of a "Momma Bear" when it comes to protecting my daughter and I have to remember to be calm when dealing with others. I find that it helps to let them first tell you what they plan to de and then to suggest areas that require further thought. I try to allow them to create plans and policies and offer suggestions. What I really want to do is march in with a list of demands but...it is less likely that they will listen or follow them.

If you have a local support group you may find that other parents in your area have had to deal with this issue and they may have some suggestions as well.

_________________
Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 23, 2007 6:52 pm 
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Joined: Mon Apr 09, 2007 3:29 pm
Posts: 192
Location: Ohio
I do not think you are over reacting. This is the life of your child. Any allergy that has an anaphalaxis reaction is life threatening and should not be treated carelessly.

_________________
Karen in Ohio mom of 7
Allergic to tons and tons of food as well as perfumes, scented air sprays and cleaners. Hubby to Fish, ds #2 Shellfish, youngest to Eggplant, potato, Caesin, Raw Tomato & spinach.


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 24, 2007 9:07 am 
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Joined: Tue Dec 05, 2006 2:47 pm
Posts: 5
Location: Ontario
Thanks Susan!
We do live in Ontario, We have met with the school and offered suggestions and some minimum standards as it is our childs life!! I do have epi trainers and information I offered the teacher, she said it was not necessary. They have now agreed to have his epi-pen carried by an adult. The adult still needs to be clarified??? We have asked about his file and emergency plan, only to receive blank stares. We are presently awaiting the superintendant of the school to return our calls. I do have Sabrina's law printed out to present. It really helps to hear support from others when going through this. I feel more assertive when I have assurance that this is not as trivial as some make you feel.
Cynthia

_________________
Mom to a 5 yr old with peanut allergy


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 24, 2007 9:23 am 
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Posts: 1054
Cynthia you are not over reacting at all. As of the issues that you raise are important ones and definitely need addressing. Although not always possible and totally dependent upon the personalities that you're dealing with, approach your child's teacher/principal, etc. as allies. Instead of demanding that things change for your son (not to suggest that this is what you have done or don't have a right to), try offering to help to make things better in whatever ways you are able. It's hard that your son's allergist isn't on board with the need for your son to carry his Epi, is it possible to approach Anaphylaxis Canada or another allergy organization in your area to provide support in this area, either by phone or letter? When I met with my son's teacher at the start of the school year I brought in an "EpiPen Trainer Kit" that I got for free at my allergist's office (EpiPen trainer, instructional DVD, quick-reference guide) so that she could practice with it at her leisure. She was very grateful and appreciated my thinking of her. Is there any way you could work with the school to show/explain why you need the safety measures in place for your son? Explain that if your son's epi is in the office, and he were to have a reaction on the playground, that seconds count and that's why he must wear his epi-belt. I think that sometimes people just don't don't carry the thought through on the logistics of things -- when I've explained this to people in the past, they've gone, "oh ya, that does make sense...". As far as the volunteer lunch monitor, what do you think about training them yourself. Maybe give them one of the EpiPen training kits -- I know I would appreciate it if I was in their position. (I don't know where you live, so don't know what laws are/are not in place to protect your son). Does your son wear a Medic Alert bracelet or another bracelet identifying his allergy? (That's another reason why an Epi-belt is also good, it's pretty hard to miss). Does your son's school permit peanuts/nuts or is it a "peanut/nut-safe" school? Hand washing is crucial in helping to prevent an allergic reaction but realistically we have to remember that teachers are only one person and they have 20 kids in their care. My son's teacher is really great about it, she has the kids wash their hands after washroom breaks, before snacks and lunch, and after eating. However, I know that what she wants to happen and what actually happens is sometimes a different story. So it's great that she's on board, but because I know the reality of the situation, I at least try to make sure that my son understands that he must make sure that he washes his hands before he eats. I wanted to see first hand how things ran at my son's school so I've offered to volunteer in his classroom. I am fortunate that I am in a position to do so, but I realize that there are a lot of working parents out there. Volunteering really allowed me to see first hand what my son's school does really well as well as where they have room for improvement. Anyway, sorry for the long post -- the other option, if you've tried your best to work with them and they are unwilling, is to seek out another school that is already on board. I hope this works out for you guys...


Last edited by ethansmom on Wed Sep 26, 2007 8:26 am, edited 2 times in total.

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 24, 2007 9:35 pm 
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Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 9:38 pm
Posts: 1643
Location: Toronto
Hi Cynthia,

When my son started school I went into the office prepared to fight to have the epi-pen kept in his classroom. I was ready to demand that his teacher carry it, because if it was in the office it was to far away. They grudgingly agreed to have the teacher responsible for it, but insisted I teach him to be responsible to carry it himself. After all, he would have more then one teacher throughout the day, and the chance of it being forgotten was to high. They said that of course he would NOT be required to self-administer, just to carry it.

I bought him a e-belt, and he has been wearing it ever since. I admit I'm very fortunate. The principal of his school previously had a student go into anaphylactic shock in the school yard, and the amount of time it took to get her epi to administer it scared the principal. Ever since, she insists that students have it with themselves at all times. All staff -- teachers, office, lunchroom, caretaking -- are trained on the epi-pen and are allowed to administer it.

You are not asking to much.

_________________
self: allergy to sesame seeds and peanuts
3 sons each with at least one of the following allergies: peniciilin, sulfa-based antibiotic, latex, insect bites/stings


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 06, 2008 12:36 am 
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I Live in Thornhill and have a son who is starting JK...he has severe allergies to peanuts, all nuts, sesame, poppy, chick peas the list is endless. The school is telling me that they are peanut sensitive not peanut free! If a child brings something with peanuts by "accident" then they would be permitted to go out in the hall to eat it. I was floored at this! He starts school on the 9th and I am very hesitant in sending him at all. They also began to tell me that we do not live in a perfect world, AND if they feel that my son has come into contact with peanuts or anything else that they will call me to have him picked up!!!!

It is funny how ignorant people can be when it is not their child!

Freaked out mom.


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2008 6:35 am 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
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Location: Ottawa
Your sons' school has told you what they won't do...have they told you what they will do? They have a legislated duty to come up with a plan/policy to avoid exposure to his allergens.

(I have split this thread as the responses seem to be taking on a life of their own and the issue of peanut/tree nut bans can become a hot topic in and of itself. To follow that conversation, see the thread Peanut/Tree nut bans)

_________________
Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2008 9:34 am 
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Joined: Wed Aug 10, 2005 11:21 am
Posts: 684
Location: Cobourg, ON
If the school is at a loss as to where to start to develop an individual plan there are examples and blank forms at www.allergysafecommunities.ca or in the resource kit: Anaphylaxis In Schools and Other Settings, which was sent to all schools in Ontario 3 years ago. This resource also came with trainers (twinject and epipen) as well.

My daughter started to wear her epipen in kindergarten. No one expects a child to administer an epipen but there are so many teacher/supervision changes in a day that to expect all of the adult to remember to pass on the epipen is really leaving the door open to mistakes. I feel very relieved to know that her epipen is always on her. I think some allergists forget how schools work. If the children are taught not to touch the ebelt, they won't . We have never had a problem with that.

Your school is negligent if they are not training teachers and supervisors. Can you volunteer to do it yourself? The law is on your side. Other school boards are training teachers, yours can to and are obligated to! Risk reduction strategies are also required like hand washing. Good luck.

_________________
11 year old daughter -- lives with life-threatening allergies to milk, eggs and peanuts; seasonal allergies (birch, maple, ragweed); pet allergies; asthma; and eczema
9 year old son - no allergies


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 21, 2008 10:12 pm 
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Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 9:38 pm
Posts: 1643
Location: Toronto
concerned mother wrote:
I Live in Thornhill and have a son who is starting JK...he has severe allergies to peanuts, all nuts, sesame, poppy, chick peas the list is endless. The school is telling me that they are peanut sensitive not peanut free! If a child brings something with peanuts by "accident" then they would be permitted to go out in the hall to eat it. I was floored at this! He starts school on the 9th and I am very hesitant in sending him at all. They also began to tell me that we do not live in a perfect world, AND if they feel that my son has come into contact with peanuts or anything else that they will call me to have him picked up!!!!

It is funny how ignorant people can be when it is not their child!

Freaked out mom.


Don't ever allow yourself to believe that *peanut free* really means 100% peanut free. If the child who bring peanuts into the school is allowed to eat it in a specific area -- I don't see the problem. This will encourage honesty from a child that brings it -- as opposed to hiding it and eating it. I recommend that you speak to the school to ensure that *if a child eats peanuts or pb they wash immediately afterwards*.

Accidents happen. And fortunately your school is willing to admit if/when an accident happens rather then turn a blind eye and hope the reaction stops.

I was once sitting in the ER when a child was brought in having what appeared to be a contact reaction. Only allergy was peanuts, she ate only her own lunch in a peanut-free school, and was having a reaction. I was sitting nearby when the principal came to talk to the mom. They had no idea what caused the reaction -- no peanuts are allowed at the school. Accidents do happen.

By separating the child who is eating peanuts they are aiming to contain the risk -- accept that it cannot ever be 100% eliminated -- so they are containing it. They are aware of it. Ask about hand washing and cleaning of the area.

_________________
self: allergy to sesame seeds and peanuts
3 sons each with at least one of the following allergies: peniciilin, sulfa-based antibiotic, latex, insect bites/stings


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 22, 2008 11:19 am 
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Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 9:38 pm
Posts: 1643
Location: Toronto
I also wanted to mention that when a school segregates the child who brings peanuts, the children tend to remember not to bring it.

You should also ask how often a child is caught with pb -- and how it usually happens. At my son's school kids occasionally open their lunch -- see what it is, cover it up and call for a supervisor. They often start by saying "dad made my lunch today....."

**********

I apologize if my previous post sounded rude or uncaring. It does sound (to me) like your school is being realistic: minimizing the amount and containing the allergen and being prepared just in case.

_________________
self: allergy to sesame seeds and peanuts
3 sons each with at least one of the following allergies: peniciilin, sulfa-based antibiotic, latex, insect bites/stings


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