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PostPosted: Mon Dec 05, 2005 12:25 am 
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Joined: Thu Sep 22, 2005 11:39 pm
Posts: 1141
Location: saskatchewan, canada
I figured I would elaborate on what I meant by "educate myself" (and follow the recommendations I was told). I was refering to that my allergist gave me information handouts, which he went through thouroughly at his office. He showed me how to use an epi-pen, and told me how to order a trainer. He directed me to other resources and recommended books. He told me to call if i had questions. However, it is so much info at once. I don't know how it would be possible for the allergist to educate further without overwhelming the parent more. I know how hard it is to get an appointment, and I understand that he is stretched thin by numerous patients. At some point after the shock wears off, the parent needs to reach out to the resources that they are given.

I regularily read through my handouts, and ordered a trainer and other info. I just look at situations like my MIL and realize that you can not force someone to learn, or take the time to regularily read through your info. It also tends to make me critical because I have seen others who have the knowledge but choose not to follow it, and heard horror stories of the ER that should be considered abuse.

I really want legislation too. The fact that my husband is alive is a miracle, and it bothers me to think that there are still kids out there put in dangerous situations by adults who know better.


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 05, 2005 10:27 am 
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Joined: Wed Mar 23, 2005 9:47 am
Posts: 305
Location: Montreal, Canada
adults who know better

You mean who SHOULD know better and act like irresponsible morrons? Yes, I agree with you.


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 09, 2006 10:23 pm 
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Joined: Sat Oct 22, 2005 8:49 pm
Posts: 28
Hi Everyone,

I started this form back in October 2005 as I was feeling a little anxious about the jump from Jr High to High School and food allergies.

Well I just came back from the High School Orientation with my son. When we arrived we received the school hand out and on the back of it there was a little blurb about allergies and awareness so I was so excited thinking I have been worrying for nothing.

After the presentation, I spoke to the principal and said I saw this and I was happy to see this article and so on only to find out the children with allergies go to a room by themselves to eat there lunch (but they can bring a friend they trust with them) because this is high school and they can't monitor food that comes into the school.

In walking around the school, I came across their "snack shop" and was full of peanut products... And if that wasn't enough they were serving Tea & Coffee & Cookies to all the parents / kids, and what's on the plate PEANUT BUTTTER COOKIES!!

I am just so discouraged. This is our home school, my son's friends are going to this school, he wants to go to this school, and I am so worried.

Any suggestions?

Julie Ann


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 10, 2006 4:48 pm 
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Joined: Wed Mar 23, 2005 1:17 pm
Posts: 50
Location: Hamilton, Ontario
Julie Ann, my peanut-allergic son is in grade 11 now. He has always eaten in the cafeteria with everyone else but he eats with his friends that are all aware of his allergy. He always takes his own food. He will not eat anything that touches the tabletop. He doesn't even use the plastic knives and forks the cafeteria puts out. (He gave me a hilarious account one day of trying to eat Alphaghetti out of the thermos when he forgot his spoon.) He knows he's different but now he's at the point where it doesn't matter. His friends accept him, and his rituals, the way he is and they bolster his confidence at every step. None of them would ever eat any peanut-containing food near him. My son has never had a reaction at school (or anywhere) since he was four. I am not trying to say you shouldn't continue to push for changes at your school. I just thought if you knew another boy was okay after three years of high school, it might relieve your mind a little. I still worry but I trust my son's judgment and I trust his friends.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 10, 2006 7:34 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 6:53 pm
Posts: 1454
Location: Canada
While I can see at the highschool level why people can't ban certain foods, I do think they should try to minimize the presence of allergens. I agree that if they were really allergy aware they would not have given out peanut butter cookies---they could have easily made another choice. Perhaps you could talk to the principal about your concerns? I don't think that not selling peanut products should be that big of a deal. (but I don't have to deal with the school system, so hopefully parents will chime in here)

Is your son contact sensitive? i.e. does he get hives/stomach upset from touching surfaces which have come in contact with nuts/peanut butter? If so, maybe you could discuss this with your allergist and you could send on the info. to the school just so that they understand what your son is dealing with. Most people don't have a clue about the risk posed by allergens on table surfaces, pencil sharpeners, etc.---the school might not be thinking along these lines at all. I think that every school should educate all the students about anaphylaxis---they should all be aware of the signs and symptoms and as well they should know about the need to wash their hands after eating lunch to minimize the risk of getting peanut butter all over everything.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 10, 2006 8:54 pm 
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Joined: Sat Oct 22, 2005 8:49 pm
Posts: 28
Thank you both for your reply.

It is re-assuring to hear that your son has made it to grade 11 without any problems.

My son has minor re-action (hives) from contact, so nothing serious (thankfully) and I do realize that the schools will never been 100% peanut / nut free. When I heard the principal response “he can eat in a room alone with a friend” it came across to me as someone with a lack of awareness and sensitivity towards allergies.

I plan on following up with the principal / trustee over the next few months and try to put some pressure on them to remove the products from the school store and vending machine and make it a little safer of environment.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 13, 2006 9:43 am 
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Joined: Wed Mar 23, 2005 1:17 pm
Posts: 50
Location: Hamilton, Ontario
My son's high school has had a new principal every year he has been there. It seems our small school (400 students) is either the place to begin the climb to a bigger school or a nice quiet place to spend a last year before retiring. Some principals were definitely less receptive than others. The vice-principal ended up being the person to approach. In grade nine, an anaphylactic teacher was helpful too.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 13, 2006 11:33 am 
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Joined: Wed Aug 10, 2005 11:21 am
Posts: 687
Location: Cobourg, ON
THe updated consensus statement from the Canadian Association of allegists, Anaphylaxis in Schools and Other Settings, is now starting to reach ON schools and schools across Canada. It has lots of information about anaphylaxis and how to manage it in the school system. It has a section on adolescents and anaphylaxis and discusses avoidance strategies for specific allergens and in high school settings. I hope it will be posted soon on the web wite of the Canadian Allergists. It will be a useful tool for schools and for parents to convince schools to take action. It has sample policies and emergency protocols.


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 23, 2006 6:59 pm 
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Joined: Sat Sep 03, 2005 3:36 pm
Posts: 5
Location: Dawson Creek, British Columbia
Hi everybody :D :D this is aleshia not aleshias mom. i am 15 and in grd 11.i think that to make school easier for your son you cant make him feel very singled out and isolated. i personally hated this because it made me feel like such a freak or outcast. It is important to notify everybody. In my personal experiences , teachers are usually pretty understanding. All of my class rooms are peanut free zones but my entire school is very far from peanut free. it can become frusterating at some times but he will learn to cope.i wear gloves every day to try to avoid skin contact. all of the students are pretty understanig as well. By the time you are in high school you are generally mature enough to understand that every body is unique and that some have special needs. All of my friends know how to use my epi pen and very protective of me. friends are very helpful. they are so helpful to have and support you 8) :D :) :lol:


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