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PostPosted: Wed Nov 09, 2005 12:20 pm 
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Joined: Wed Nov 09, 2005 11:43 am
Posts: 2
Hi everyone,
My daughter started JK this year and although the school is great in dealing with her peanut allergy, I'm having difficulties with parents of other kids who do not understand how severe her allergy is. She has reacted on several occasions to peanut butter when the butter had been removed from the room several hours before she entered and also to a chocolate bar wrapper that had been left on the ground close to where she was playing. One father has threatened the school's administration, he suggested that she be secluded while eating not realizing the effects the aftermath could have on my daughter. Have others been in similar situations and what have you done?


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 09, 2005 1:06 pm 
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Joined: Thu Sep 22, 2005 11:39 pm
Posts: 1141
Location: saskatchewan, canada
First off, that father would change sides in a heartbeat if his kid developed a life threatening allergy. Many schools are completely nut free. He has no possition to be threatening the schools administration for. :evil: Hopefully, he is just uninformed of how HIS child could be responsible for another child having a life threatening situation.

Last year my daughter (peanut/nut allergic) was in preschool (she was 3 ). There were a few incidents of children bringing snacks that were not completely nut free into the "nut free" school. The school and other parents felt that it was fine because my daughter was not eating it. On a field trip, the girl siting in the seat next to her on the bus had a caramel nut granola bar. I was not very pleased.

This year she is 4 and at the same preschool. I asked the school to include some info in the newsletter about allergies.

*Allergens can easily be passed to allergic kids by other children who have eaten the foods that they are allergic to.

Unwashed hands and faces can leave traces on toys, tables, door knobs, classroom materials, water fountain, class playdoh etc. Occassionally the children play games that require them to hold hands. Contaminated toys, tables etc. can cause reactions.

Children who have eaten foods that another child is allergic to might also place toys and other items in their mouths and contaminate them for the allergic child. Ocassionally young children do kiss each other as well. This can also cause reactions. *

Allergen free snacks can be contaminated while being prepared. Bread boards, knives and unwashed hands can contaminate food.

Sharing this info helped a lot. The mother of the girl who had the nutty granola bar last year reads all labels and now only sends snacks with the "peanut free " logo on them. Many other parents have told me that their child no longer eats peanut butter for breakfast on school days, and that they carefully watch their preparation habits, making sure that they do not cross-contaminate snacks sent to school. Giving some info as to "how their child may directly be responsible for an allergic reaction" has made a lot of them much more careful.

As the kids get older, bullying with allergens becomes an issue too. I hope that when parents realize that their kids might bully allergic kids with their allergens, they realize that proper management of food in school is in everyones best interest.

To the phrase "if you don't like what the other kids are eating at school... then seclude them or homeschool them" I reply "If you don't like what your children are allowed to eat at school without putting another child at risk...then feed them at home!!"


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 09, 2005 1:10 pm 
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Joined: Wed Mar 23, 2005 9:47 am
Posts: 305
Location: Montreal, Canada
You should tell that dad that everytime he brings in peanut butter in the room with your daughter, it's like playing Russian roulette. Would he like to try?

I'm sorry but I have no tolerance for stupid people and lately, it seems the world is full of them. People are getting dumber and dumber. I hope that the school board has sense enought to think that guy is a NUT! Literally.

Seriously, what's saskmommy said. Keep fighting. Hang in there and don't let the moron win.


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 09, 2005 11:23 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6471
Location: Ottawa
Quote:
One father has threatened the school's administration, he suggested that she be secluded while eating not realizing the effects the aftermath could have on my daughter.

This is discrimination.
People like this should be encouraged to speak for a long time as they really start to sound ridiculous after a while.
This sounds like a man with control issues and I would never fuly trust that he would comply with any reasonable request.
I guess I am grateful that his chidren are in the public school system as they will be exposed to many points of view other than his.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 10, 2005 9:19 am 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 6:53 pm
Posts: 1454
Location: Canada
I agree with Susan. I doubt the school administration will take very well to being bullied although some people *do* cave in to being pressured.


Last edited by Helen on Thu Jun 01, 2006 8:52 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Thu Nov 10, 2005 10:41 am 
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Joined: Tue Jun 07, 2005 1:10 pm
Posts: 44
Location: Clarington
Education is key to affecting change.

Contact your principal to discuss strategies to deal with this problem. See what he/she has to offer. It truly isn't your responsibility to deal with these problem parents but most know that it does end up that we deal with it one way or another.

So here are few suggestions

1) See if the principal could include a section of the monthly newsletter to educate. You may not reach the truly problem parents but might reach their friends who may see things your way.

2) Could a speaker to come to "Open House" or "Parent/Teacher interview night. Perhaps it might only be a display with a speaker there to enlighten. Make sure they are in a prominant position within the school so that all parents will likely pass by.

3) See if that speaker could come and speak to the student body. Do not underestimate the impact you can have on these children. If they understand, they may comply even when their parent's don't understand. A parent in my own community who was vehemently opposed to the "peanut/nut free" classroom designation at our elementary school had a son who seemed to cooperate. So much so that when he brought the pb sandwich that his mom had packed to school he was described as being embarassed and did not eat his sandwich that day.

Hope this may help.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 14, 2005 8:07 pm 
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Joined: Thu Sep 22, 2005 11:39 pm
Posts: 1141
Location: saskatchewan, canada
I overheard my daughters preschool teacher telling another childs grandma to make sure that her grandchild does not eat peanut butter for breakfast on school days. She reminded the grandma that they have children with severe nut allergies...and do not want the classroom contaminated by the other children coming to school with traces of their breakfast on them.

The preschool teachers have been really co-operative and willing to learn about how other kids can cause reactions. Unfortunately, they do not think that it is possible to go milk free for my younger daughter next year. But, I have found a different preschool that will.


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PostPosted: Wed May 31, 2006 1:53 am 
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Joined: Wed May 31, 2006 12:18 am
Posts: 45
Location: Edmonton
I canoot believe that people are still so ignorant!! :evil:
It makes me really upset to read stuff like this! I thought that times were changing but I guess that I am wrong!
That father can threaten the administration all he wants, it won't change anything. They can't get fired for protecting a student. And how is a child supposed to make friends and learn to socialize if she's isolated from her peers? Maybe it's for the best if they've got parents like these! I'm soory form my anger but I'm so sick of trying to get people to understand the dangers of allergies. It's basically like asking a kid to take a shot of poison! I wish that the media covered allergies as much as they do other issues, and not just when someone dies, because then it is too late.

Caroline[/quote]

_________________
Anaphylaxis to fish, nut, peanuts, soy, birch, and grass.
OAS


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PostPosted: Wed May 31, 2006 10:52 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
Caroline - I do understand your anger. It's so hard to deal with people when they say things like that.

For the media, I think things are getting better. For one, we now have Allergic Living. :)

Also, just off the top of my head:

- National Geographic has a long article about allergies this month: http://www.allergicliving.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=941

- The Toronto Star had a huge section on allergies last month: http://www.allergicliving.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=972

And Macleans magazine has a long article on allergies in the current issue. I haven't seen it yet, but someone is mailing it to me. I just did a search of Macleans online and they have had a number of articles in the past few months about various aspects of allergy: http://search.macleans.ca/search.asp?St ... =12&go.y=5

There is also one I love to point people to called "The Allergy Prison": http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.h ... th&pagewan

It soooo resonated with me when I first read it.

Education definitely is key. Even if the "bullies" don't get it, more of the "bystanders" will over time, and they will be our allies.

K.

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 01, 2006 8:07 pm 
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Joined: Wed May 31, 2006 12:18 am
Posts: 45
Location: Edmonton
Hi Karen!

Thanks for the links. I got the Macleans article today and it is really good! I didn't know about the National Geographoc though so I'll have to check it out.

Thanks

Caroline

_________________
Anaphylaxis to fish, nut, peanuts, soy, birch, and grass.
OAS


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