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PostPosted: Sat Oct 24, 2009 9:31 am 
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Joined: Fri Oct 10, 2008 9:40 pm
Posts: 2034
Location: ottawa
A dear friend emailed me last night, her good friend needs help as this mom's daughter , 5 yrs, was just diagnosed with a peanut allergy. Before she dives into food, parenting, product info. she needs a run down of the top things she MUST do Monday with regards to keeping her daughter safe at school. I did email this mom and directed her to this forum. To start her off I thought I'd post for her and get her the help she needs asap.

THANKS :D

_________________
DD 12 yrs -no allergies
4 yr old DS - asthma/eczema Anaphylactic to Peanuts, all tree nuts, sesame , all pea/lentil legumes, gelatin.
Allergic to trees, grass,ragweed, feathers, dander, mold and dust.
Outgrew eggs, fish, shellfish


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 24, 2009 12:13 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jun 26, 2007 2:45 pm
Posts: 802
Location: Vancouver, BC
Yikes - I'm glad now that our diagnosis was when my DD was 2.5 and not in school or daycare yet.

I would say these are important things she needs to do:

1 - Get epipens and make sure her DD wears at least one and there is at least one other kept in an accessible spot at the school
2 - Get all school staff trained on signs, symptoms, avoidance strategies and epipen usage, if they aren't already
3 - make sure child knows not to eat anything that didn't come from home
4 - make sure teacher knows all the protocol and keeps an eye out for other children asking questions or possible teasing
5 - make sure there is a policy for subs that might come into the classroom, or for other classes (music class, etc) - in our school, the principal or secretary lets the sub know about my DD's allergy alerts the sub to the anaphylaxis care plan near the teacher's desk
6 - create an anaphylaxis care plan which includes child's specific symptoms, allergens, and have this posted in classroom, office, staff room, etc, of in a known and accessible location. In our school, it's posted next to the teacher's desk (away from the door so strangers wouldn't be able to see it), at the secretary's desk, and in the 'allergy binder' kept in the office along with the children's spare epipens
7 - if you're not sure about crackers, cookies, give child food you are sure about (ie fresh veggies, fruit, etc) at school until you have time to research brands
8 - send safe treats for child in case someone brings a bday cake that she can't eat
9 - longer term - if the school doesn't have an anaphylaxis policy, help them create one
10 - thank people who are providing their time and extra help to keep your daughter safe!
That's all I can think of for now - hope I'm not forgetting anything crucial! Good luck to your friend.

_________________
DD 2004 Allergy to peanuts, egg, sesame, and new: lentils and chick peas
DS 2006 Allergy to peanuts, tree nuts, milk, egg, kiwi fruit, eczema


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 24, 2009 8:19 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6465
Location: Ottawa
1.Go to http://allergicliving.com/features.asp?copy_id=41 and familiarize yourself on what your rights are in your province/territory/country.
Check out http://www.allergicliving.com/features.asp?copy_id=291 for articles and issues regarding food allergies and school.
2. Get recent photo so that you can attach it to the Anaphylaxis Emergency Plan.
3. Complete Anaphylaxis Emergency Plan Allergy SAfe Communities has a good one in English or French (top right corner of home page) http://allergysafecommunities.ca/pages/ ... p?catid=33
4. Go to the school and get the required medical forms, get the form for the Medic Alert bracelet (No Child Without program offers a free bracelet/membership but you need to get the form from the school) ask about what training the staff have already received.
5. Speak with the principal and teacher (if possible) about what has been/ can be done to keep your child safe.
6. Get an E-belt or equivalent so that your child always has her medication on her.
7. Get trainers and learn to use it, teach everyone.
8. Talk to your daughter maybe get some books out of the library, this is pretty scary but also new and it takes some time to remember. Let her know that it is serious and she can't eat or drink anything unless mommy or daddy have checked that it's OK. It's not always easy to tell so she mustn't take something from the teacher, volunteer or a classmate. Give her a hug!
9. Have your daughter decorate a container to keep safe treats in.
10. Look for a local support group. You are embarking on a new life with not much of a road map to start with and much of what you're told won't sink in right away. Don't re-invent the wheel. Local groups can offer your suggestions about where you can get things in your neighbourhood. You might even find some members who have children in the same school!

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Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 01, 2009 3:51 pm 
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Joined: Mon Aug 24, 2009 6:24 pm
Posts: 62
Location: NB
Hi,
I just wanted to pass on that the Allergy and Asthma Information Association (non profit) has an Anaphlaxis reference kit that can be presented to the schools. In NB it is the required training for staff. If you visit their website you will find contact information for each region of Canada.
When my son, was diagnosed, they were my first call. My regional coordinator suggested I have two epipens and get a referral to a pediatrician from my doctor. She filled in many of the blanks that were not covered by the emergency room doctors instructions to keep him away from peanuts and to get an epipen. My own doctor had never heard of getting two epipens - she helped me learn to advocate for my son.
I never contacted the AAIA again until it was time for my son to go to school. Again, I needed help to advocate for my son. The forum here was most helpful as I dealt with the emotional
transition,and the AAIA was a great advocate for my son and the school was amazingly responsive. The AAIA coordinator trained my sons school and I am confident now that they know what they need to know to prevent and respond to an emergency. ( I attended the training with the school personal as recommended by the Department of Education)

You are a good friend
Jomatt

_________________
Son - Anaphylaxis to peanuts, treenuts, allergic to cats, dogs, grass & trees


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 01, 2009 4:48 pm 
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Joined: Fri Oct 10, 2008 9:40 pm
Posts: 2034
Location: ottawa
Thank you all so very much. Great advice!!!

_________________
DD 12 yrs -no allergies
4 yr old DS - asthma/eczema Anaphylactic to Peanuts, all tree nuts, sesame , all pea/lentil legumes, gelatin.
Allergic to trees, grass,ragweed, feathers, dander, mold and dust.
Outgrew eggs, fish, shellfish


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 01, 2009 10:01 pm 
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Joined: Sun Oct 25, 2009 4:24 pm
Posts: 190
Location: B.C.
The previous messages gave you good advice.
Joining a local support group is invaluable. Expereince and encouragement really help.
Here are a few pratical tips:
Keep safe cupcakes in the freezer and know (with the teacher's help) when birthdays are likely to be.
You can pack a safe cupcake for your child in with her snack so she is not left out. My daughter was often happier with her own.
Teach your daughter to always wash before eating. Only eat foods from home.
Build friendships. Classmates will often look out for our allergic children and speak up for them.
A video like "Alexander the Elephant Who Couldn't Eat Peanuts" can be used to help build understanding.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 02, 2009 1:15 pm 
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Joined: Thu Feb 26, 2009 12:05 am
Posts: 647
Location: AB, Canada
If she doesn't have everything in order (epipens, anaphylaxis plan etc..) in place, it's ok for her DD to miss a few days of school. We found out about DS's PA last year, and I kept him home for a few days while I got things sorted out.

Hugs to your friend.

_________________
DSs 7,7,9 all PA


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