You are viewing Allergic Living Canada | Switch to United States

Talking Allergies

* FAQ    * Search
* Login   * Register
It is currently Thu Nov 27, 2014 7:58 am

All times are UTC - 4 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 52 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next
Author Message
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jul 27, 2006 11:32 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Sep 22, 2005 11:39 pm
Posts: 1141
Location: saskatchewan, canada
Gwen, Homeschooling is happening everwhere. It just isn't obvious that people are homeschoolers. They look like anyone else. The only time you can really have an assumption that someone else homeschools is if they are at the zoo, library etc during school hours.There are local organizations everywhere. If you google homeschooling and your province you will probably find a few large ones, and who to contact locally.

Over a million kids homeschool in the U.S.

I have chosen not to do a cyber school. I have heard great things about that virtual school, but not alot about canadian ones since we have chosen not to go with them. We are using curriculum for math and language arts. Homeschool resource distributers have LOTS of manipulatives to teach math, and I really like the idea of visually seeing the concepts. For science and social studies there are tons of canadian resources. This is one of my favorite sites
http://www.canadianhomeeducation.com/in ... Id=EVEREST{B447D722-2233-4795-9024-65D54C4DA1F5} If you search under science amd socail studies you will see how much there is on just this one site. You can cover topics as your child is interested in them (or you can spark an interest first)...which helps a lot with motivation and long term retention of material. The other homeschool family we met camping had recently learned about all the sask/alta forts and was out touring them. How cool is that for the kids? I think we will do that too when we cover forts.

Locally we have highschool correspondance courses through the school district, for highschool credit. They are free, and through certified teachers. Some homeschoolers try highschool, or choose not to because of the time wasted attending school. If a homeschooler can complete recommended work in half the time (correspondance), they can have more time to experience the "real world" through volunteer work , participation in extracurricular activities, and through a part time job.

_________________
DD age 9 1/2 -peanuts, nuts,
DD age 7 1/2 - milk, eggs, chicken, peanuts, treenuts, cats, dogs,
DS age 2 1/2
Husband- asthma, eggs, treenuts, fish, shellfish environmental
Self - penicillan, eurithromiacin, mild laytex allergy.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jul 27, 2006 12:11 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Aug 11, 2005 6:48 pm
Posts: 614
Location: Ontario, Canada / Cambridge, UK
I think this is a great topic and I would be very interested to read an article about it in AL.

_________________
16-year-old son: peanuts, nuts, raw egg whites, asthmatic
Self: allergic rhinitis, fragrance/chemical sensitivities, oral allergy syndrome


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jul 27, 2006 2:25 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jul 13, 2005 10:31 pm
Posts: 97
Location: Montreal
Homeschooling in Montreal here, and in French, although some of the activities listed later are in English.

We have montlhy 'school outings', sometimes even twice a month, where the kids go to various museums around town, and get whatever activities are available to schools. Think about it, *monthly*. Which school will take its students out every single month during the school year?

On top of those monthly activities, we have special ones, like theater plays usually three times a year. Last year we had *free* opera, at the Opera de Montreal. We have swim&gym for phys ed every Tuesday, for three sessions of 10 weeks each. Between 75 to 100 kids are registered at those swim&gym. We also have art classes on Wednesday morning, gymnastics (as in artistic gymnastics, not phys ed) on Thrusday morning. There's theater classes on Fridays (that's English).

On top of those homeschool specific activities, we have violin lessons, Girl Guides (my daughter is in Sparks), Boy Scouts (my son is in Cubs), riding lessons for my son last year (we won't continue this year). The whole summer was spent at the local swimming club, where my son did competitive swimming (he wants to continue competitive swimming during the winter). We also do camping, although this particular summer was too busy with the swimming. We will however go camping at MarineLand *after* Labour Day, so we can avoid the huge crowds, and get more of a learning experience with the marine animals.

School wise, we are able to cater to the kids' needs, which extend far beyond food allergies. My son is gifted in certain areas, and slightly behind in others. We are able to let him learn at his own pace, and if that means he reaches university level in math at age 14, so be it. It happened to homeschooling friends of ours, and that's how we learned that University of Athabasca http://www.athabascau.ca/ has a great long distance program and will take kids at age 14 *if* they're ready. That means you can get a university degree at home, and be ready for full attendance at age 18 like everyone else, except you'd be dealing with a *second* degree instead of a first. So far my son is dealing with secondary 1 math (grade 7). In school he'd be starting grade 3. He does French and English as a first language, French at a grade 6 level, English grade 4. Ok, so he draws like he's in kindergarden, and his handwriting is awful. But he can handle a computer just fine, and type up his work, and even draw on the computer. The drawing and handwriting problems will mostly disappear when all work will be expected to be done on the computer anyway at the higher levels.

Cyberschools will give you a peace of mind as far as allergies are concerned, but you will not be taking advantage of the positive sides of homeschooling. In other words, you'll lose on the school experience without replacing it with the homeschooling advantages. "homeschool" is a misnomer. You are never home. You are out there in the community, learning about it first hand. You are visiting the historical sites, not just learning about them. You are seeing geography first hand. We're doing Native Americans (well, we were until the competitive swimming took over, but that's ok, because the Native Americans will still be there in September, and we can still go and visit). Not far from here, there are TWO places to visit with archeological digs. Both places have reconstructed Iroquois long houses. Both places will teach you first hand about how Iroquois lived, so why restrict learning to a book? Take your kids out and visit the world if you can afford it! (or at least your local library). There is so much to see out there...


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jul 29, 2006 8:16 pm 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2005 6:39 pm
Posts: 2948
Location: Toronto
Cleo, Really interesting. Most kids would love the theatre and other outings.

Were allergies your impetus for homeschooling? If you don't mind my asking, what allergies are you dealing with? You mention a pretty big group of homeschoolers, are allergies a factor among the other families, or other health conditions - or is this simply a parental choice to school other than in the public system?

Saskmof2 will be teaching/caring full-time, do you? It sounds like it would be a pretty full-time occupation.

Either of you, what happens in terms of testing/exams - do the ministries of ed in the various provinces set standards that homeschoolers adhere to? Or how is progress determined/tracked?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jul 29, 2006 8:42 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jul 13, 2005 10:31 pm
Posts: 97
Location: Montreal
Allergies were a part of our decision, giftedness another part. My son (the eldest) deals with peanuts, nuts, and soy allergies. When he was about to enter the school system, we were also dealing with egg allergy, now outgrown. My daughter (officially starting first grade this september, although we're already done with first grade ) deals with peanuts, nuts and mustard. Just *try* to get a school to go mustard free...

In our homeschool group, most parents homeschool for ideologistic reasons. Some do deal with food allergies, or celiac disease. Some have kids with ADHD and refuse medication. But most homeschool because they see it as a superior way of getting an education. In fact, many like me start for practical reason and do discover a great way of living and raising kids! Even if the food allergies were to disappear, I wouldn't put my kids in the school system.

As for exams, it will vary from province to province. From a legal point of view, only high school exams are mandatory (at least in Quebec) in order to get a high school diploma. However, the high school diploma is not mandatory to get into university. (that's a well kept secret!) Here's an excerpt from the University of Ottawa
http://www.uottawa.ca/prospective/admis ... chool.html
Quote:

The University of Ottawa evaluates applications from home-schooled students on an individual basis. Applicants should supply detailed information about the curriculum and methodology used in acquiring the knowledge they have. Any standardized tests that have been taken should also be provided.

Scholarships can be awarded to home-schooled applicants if the University can calculate an average that is comparable to applicants in a regular school program. For example, if a student has followed a recognized curriculum with independent assessment.

_________________
11yo boy - peanuts nuts chickpeas
8yo daughter - peanuts, nuts, mustard, eggs, sunflowers (new! ), oral allergy syndrome
husband - pollen of all kinds
me - seafood,, oral allergy syndrome


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jul 29, 2006 11:07 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Sep 22, 2005 11:39 pm
Posts: 1141
Location: saskatchewan, canada
We have a choice what method of tracking to do. I will be submitting a portfolio of work, and an annual summary in addition to my letter of intent (posted earlier) which my final draft did go into much more detail in specific subjest goals for the following year. It's actually not that big a deal. I have been putting some of her finished workbooks and activities in a storage container. It is actually fun. I get to do the proud mom thing and brag to someone how well she is doing and they have to listen :wink: . I also have the option of CTBS tests, which go on official record, but it is optional. I may do it later since my daughter is doing quite well and it would look good on her permanant record to have glowing test scores.

From what I understand, highschool credits and exams like GED, are NOT mandatory for entrance into post secondary. Many institutions including Harvard and Yale (and canadian schools as well), accept homeschoolers with no "official" diploma. Honestly, the ability of a student can not truly be jugded by highschool diploma alone. Most post secondary institutions use SAT or other entrance exams. If we choose the route of highschool credits we can do so free through correspondance. I have also heard that university "scouts" show up at homeschool conferences and local get togethers. Generally, homeschoolers are self disciplined, and attend a school ready to learn (not party) and make the school look good...so they are wanted.

Providing your kids with an eduction is your right as a parent, denying your children an education is not your right. If you are homeschooling the kids have to be learning, but the content, and the method of instruction is your choice. The content learned isn't even consistent from school to school in the same district! If you think about it, too much control and "jumping through hoops" on the part of the government is not democratic and congruent with a free society. Forcing children to attend schools which do not fullfill their needs for the sake of government control over what they learn, so everyone learns the same thing??? That's not Canadian.

Quote:
Even if the food allergies were to disappear, I wouldn't put my kids in the school system.


I totally agree. I feel lucky that I have really had the "push" to look into this. Thanks for your help Cleo!!! I think a lot of people hear "homeschool" and think that you sit in the house all day, alone, day after day. I guess technically you could do that, but there are a world of opportunities and adventures to explore and learn from which are more readily available than if a child were in school all day.

I've heard various reasons why a family initially chooses to homeschool including:
-health problems (allergies, diabeties, heart condition)
-ADD/ADHD "diagnosed" by the school who wants the kids on meds. The kids do great at home, learning med free with shorter work periods and learning through doing...not just sitting.
-religious reasons
-military families -move around a lot, don't want to continually interupt child in school year, and be dropped in another school
-families who understand the educational benefits
-kids who were bullied
-kids who were not challenged in school
-kids who live in bad neighbouhoods with failing schools and really bad influences in the school (ex. drugs).
-geographic location

I know of homeschoolers who incorporate a business (such as a homeschool supply on-line store) into their lives. It provides extra cash, the kids help and learn business, and they get to check out a ton of material and see everything first hand. Others sometimes babysit school kids before and after school and on days off. I heard of a family who sold their home, bought a fifth wheel and truck and is travelling the U.S. selling homeschool resources. They are touring all kinds of places, historical sites and learning on the road. Some homeschool parents work part time. There are even single parents who work and homeschool. My friend with allergic kids is going back to work in a few weeks from mat leave and I am her alternate sitter. I don't watch the kids a lot, a day here or there or a week if her sitter is on vacation...but the kids like to play with their friends anyways. I hoping it saves money when the kids don't NEED to have everything their classmates have, just to fit in :wink: .

I worked prior to having kids, I will probably work after we are done homeschooling. Work related opportunities will always be there. I only get one chance at being a parent. I do not want to have regrets. For me it may be full time, for the next 15 years...but I look at all the things we could do and I get excited. I can't wait until my kids are old enough for some of the resources I have seen, and field trips I have planned in my head. Maybe I'm a dork, but I find re-learning all this stuff really interesting (thats the public school in me telling me learning is not cool :( ).

_________________
DD age 9 1/2 -peanuts, nuts,
DD age 7 1/2 - milk, eggs, chicken, peanuts, treenuts, cats, dogs,
DS age 2 1/2
Husband- asthma, eggs, treenuts, fish, shellfish environmental
Self - penicillan, eurithromiacin, mild laytex allergy.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Aug 01, 2006 3:32 pm 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2005 6:39 pm
Posts: 2948
Location: Toronto
At the risk of having buns tossed at my head by you two, I'll confess that I'm fairly pro public school. I've seen some very good ones, run by amazing principals. And I know a few very passionate p.s. teachers who'd do anything for "their kids". I know not all are like that, but I'm not down on the system as a whole. But you two obviously have reasons to feel less than impressed.

You both sound very dedicated, and certainly make a compelling case for homeschooling, especially for kids with allergies. You've particularly eased my mind on the socializing aspects - always wondered about that.

I guess it's because I'm an editor-detail freak, but I still wonder a little about consistency of curriculum in homeschooling. You two might be excellent, but what about in the hands of less capable (however well-meaning) parents? There is something to be said for provincial standards. Do you try to support/assist other homeschool parents at meetings? What about with subjects such as math - where there are always new teaching methods and skills being developed?

I know - I have a lot of questions! It's because I'm interested. :)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Aug 08, 2006 12:23 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Sep 22, 2005 11:39 pm
Posts: 1141
Location: saskatchewan, canada
Sorry it took so long to respond Gwen, I was camping with my girls and just got home.

Quote:
I'll confess that I'm fairly pro public school. I've seen some very good ones, run by amazing principals. And I know a few very passionate p.s. teachers who'd do anything for "their kids".


I agree that there are good teachers who would do anything for their "kids". But honestly, they have got to be overwhelmed. While contemplating my decision, I spoke with a vice principal who I feel has great experience knowing what happens in the life of an allergic child day to day at school. This person was not able to discuss specific details with me about the students, but there is at least one child at the school with severe allergies to more than just peanuts, which are "banned". Infact, it was this person who strongly suggested I look into homeschooling.

I quote this person here " The school has hundreds of kids who come to school everyday with food, and the ability to bring something capable of severely harming the allergic child. The kids are all aware who has allergies, and to what, and they are told by their parents what an injustice it is to accomidate these kids. The teachers can not check everything, and can not monitor what hundreds of kids are doing every minute of the day. They are overwhelmed. Bullying with allergens happens, and the severity is not understood by the bullies. The average class has 25 kids, approx 6 with major behavior difficulties in every class, and kids with health problems with one teacher. If it was my child, I would homeschool."

Quote:
You two might be excellent, but what about in the hands of less capable (however well-meaning) parents?


Thanks for the vote of confidence Gwen :wink: . I have found the majority of homeschool parents to be quite intellegent. There are "teachers editions" for those who need extra help, and correspondance for higher grades. The common motivation of "what is best for my child" really seems to encourage a parent to read up on homeschooling, and really research the curriculum that they are considering. Think of how well we all have learned about allergies. It is no different. You learn what a first, third or seventh grader might enjoy and learn from and go from there. I am new at this homeschool thing, so I would not really consider myself one to give advise just yet.

Quote:
What about with subjects such as math - where there are always new teaching methods and skills being developed?


Math curriculum is the most "school like" that I have seen of all the subjects. We have been using singapore math, which I have been told is more fast moving, less repetative for those who learn quickly, and get bored of too much repetition of concepts they already understand. Saxon math moves slower, and is more repetative. I don't worry about math because I must admit, I excelled in math throughout my own schooling. I think I will pick up any concept that comes along in a book enough to be able to assist. My school contemplated having me skip grades, but it never happened due to the fact that I was already young (october baby). I was INSANELY bored, and the school never knew what to do with me because I was always finished really quickly. I spent many hours in school with my "head down quietly waiting" or tudoring classmates. I have heard of some parents whose kids get help from other homeschool parents in math.

Quote:
At the risk of having buns tossed at my head by you two, I'll confess that I'm fairly pro public school.


I am pro public school in some ways as well. I am all for a universal system of educating children...ALL children. I am not all for the idea of kids being denied the right to attend school, or a safe school. I do not think any child should be left behind. I think that having publicly funded schools is good for society as a whole. But, I am concerned with the minority child whose needs (educationally, emotionally, safety wise) do not get met because of what the majority needs or feels entitled to.

Quote:
I know - I have a lot of questions! It's because I'm interested. \


Thats okay :D . As with allergies, education is the key to understanding homeschooling. I have read some good books lately:

What the Rest of Us Can learn from Homeschooling by Linda Dobson
Homeschooling A Parents guide To Teaching Children by Samuel L. Blumenfield
The Homeschooling Handbook by Mary Griffith

They explain things in more detail than I can. There are LOTS of good homeschooling books at any library.

_________________
DD age 9 1/2 -peanuts, nuts,
DD age 7 1/2 - milk, eggs, chicken, peanuts, treenuts, cats, dogs,
DS age 2 1/2
Husband- asthma, eggs, treenuts, fish, shellfish environmental
Self - penicillan, eurithromiacin, mild laytex allergy.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Aug 08, 2006 6:43 am 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6491
Location: Ottawa
Wow! :)
Saskmommyof2-Were you working prior to homeschooling? If so how did you handle the decrease in pay? Are you given any tax breaks?

_________________
Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Aug 08, 2006 2:47 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Sep 22, 2005 11:39 pm
Posts: 1141
Location: saskatchewan, canada
Susan,

I have not worked since a few months before my yougest was born...so about 3 1/2 years. We were always busy with allergy concerns, sleepless nights from itching, trying to feed ourselves, and find anything that did not cause problems. Trying to fit a job in there somewhere would have been insane! My husband and I played around with our computer income tax program, and looked at different scenarios...staying home, working and paying child care (at least $800/month) and we were not much ahead if I worked and was no longer considered a "dependant". I know the child care expense would not be there when the kids would be school age...so yes, then we will be giving up a lot (money wise) by having me at home.

Prior to having our youngest we owned our own business and at least one of us worked EVERY DAY, except christmas, new years (but did inventory) and easter because we were closed. My husband even worked the morning shift the day of our wedding, (got married new years eve, so we would at least get to wake up together the morning after the wedding) the we counted inventory the day after the wedding (because it was Jan 1, and inventory day). I even had to wait for my husband to leave work to get a ride home from the hospital after our first daughter was born. So I have definitely been there where there is too much work...and no fun time. I really like being able to do the house work, baking etc. while he is at work and having that family time. I just can not imagine if we were still in that position work wise, cleaning and baking on the weekends, and having no time for enjoying life.

Being a one income family seems to me to be a lot easier here in sask., than it would be in other provinces. Our cost of living (housing, vehicle insuance etc.) is a lot...I mean A LOT less than what I am sure many of you guys in other provinces are having to spend. We looked into a few moves with my husbands job (calgary, edmonton, toronto) and even with a raise we would have been MUCH worse of financially.

_________________
DD age 9 1/2 -peanuts, nuts,
DD age 7 1/2 - milk, eggs, chicken, peanuts, treenuts, cats, dogs,
DS age 2 1/2
Husband- asthma, eggs, treenuts, fish, shellfish environmental
Self - penicillan, eurithromiacin, mild laytex allergy.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Aug 14, 2006 10:13 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jul 13, 2005 10:31 pm
Posts: 97
Location: Montreal
Hey, I'm back from camping too! ;-)


Many many families near me live on one salary. We do too, but we're a special case. I made plenty of money before 'retiring', and we have no debts. Not even a mortgage. But, as I said, most homeschooling families are not in that situation by far!

Living on one salary isn't the end of the world. The expenses are often less than sending the kids to school (just how many shoes/boots do they need in school anyway ? Indoor shoes, indoor sport shoes, outdoor sport shoes, rain boots, snow boots.. Add the pressure to get the right kind of clothing (even if there's a school uniform) "But mom, I can't wear this at school!" is rarely heard among homeschoolers. We make extensive use of the library, and there's a good resale market for used books. Meals are most often homemade, even lunch, so you can really control your grocery bills. There's time for all those home cooked meals, plus it counts as home ec, math, reading, etc, when you get the kids involved. My 8yo boy is a better cook than I was at 18! Lol!

We tend to drive older cars, and we don't have an XBox, a Nintendo, and whatever else that fits on the TV. Many homeschooling families don't even own a TV! It eats too much of your time. We have one, *and* cable, and we never ever watch it. We could definitely save on the cable fees, except my husband insists on it. Plus it gives me high speed internet access. ;-)

Homeschooling is a way of life, that is quite different from the norm. Therefore, you cannot do a simple comparison of revenues (one salary vs two). Too many variables will change.

Oh, and there's no tax break.. Some provinces (Alberta, BC, and I believe Ontario under certain circumstances) will give you $$ for books if you follow the provincial curriculum. But one shouldn't expect much.

_________________
11yo boy - peanuts nuts chickpeas
8yo daughter - peanuts, nuts, mustard, eggs, sunflowers (new! ), oral allergy syndrome
husband - pollen of all kinds
me - seafood,, oral allergy syndrome


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Aug 14, 2006 10:27 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jul 13, 2005 10:31 pm
Posts: 97
Location: Montreal
gwentheeditor wrote:
At the risk of having buns tossed at my head by you two, I'll confess that I'm fairly pro public school

There are two aspects to this. I *want* public schools to be good, and deliver appropriate education. Some succeed, others not so much, but at least kids are given a chance, and not forgotten by society. Everyone does get an education. And that's good.
On the other hand, the current system isn't equipped to deal with kids that are outside of the norm. Or even parents that are outside of the norm ;-) .

gwentheeditor wrote:
I guess it's because I'm an editor-detail freak, but I still wonder a little about consistency of curriculum in homeschooling.

Why would it matter if a kid learns about Native People in grade 3? Maybe for this particular child, grade 5 would be better. If you wait till the child develops a natural curiosity about a subject (and there are ways of 'triggering' that natural curiosity, but none to impose it), the child will retain much more.
Consistency of curriculum doesn't exist. From school to school, there are variations. There are variations from year to year. And even from kid to kid. You can teach kids a specific subject in early grade only to realise they have completely forgotten about it in high school. And then teachers skip pages, students get sick and miss a few lessons. Everyone who graduates high school knows different things.

Quote:

what about in the hands of less capable (however well-meaning) parents?


saskmommyof2 answered this one properly. We learned about food allergies, didn't we? And why did we learn? Becaues we care about our kids. There are tons of books out there about teaching kids in a homeschooling environment. There are plenty of ways to get specific tutoring when the teaching parent is lacking. There are as many variations as there are homeschooling families.

_________________
11yo boy - peanuts nuts chickpeas
8yo daughter - peanuts, nuts, mustard, eggs, sunflowers (new! ), oral allergy syndrome
husband - pollen of all kinds
me - seafood,, oral allergy syndrome


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Aug 15, 2006 1:47 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Sep 22, 2005 11:39 pm
Posts: 1141
Location: saskatchewan, canada
I had one of those moments yesterday that remided me why I am homeschooling.

My daughters friend who lives near us (and comes over about 3 days a week) began "french camp" yesterday. It is basically a week of french immersion at a school for french immersion kids whose parents do not speak french at home to become familiar with french prior to the return to school. It is a combined camp with kids from various schools and the teachers are not the regular school teachers and are not familiar with the kids. My daughters other friend (with PA) did not attend this year, but was planning on attending in future years (currently she just finished K).

So what do you think they did at the first day of french camp? They baked cookies. AHHHHH :evil:

_________________
DD age 9 1/2 -peanuts, nuts,
DD age 7 1/2 - milk, eggs, chicken, peanuts, treenuts, cats, dogs,
DS age 2 1/2
Husband- asthma, eggs, treenuts, fish, shellfish environmental
Self - penicillan, eurithromiacin, mild laytex allergy.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Aug 15, 2006 4:44 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jul 13, 2005 10:31 pm
Posts: 97
Location: Montreal
Cleo wrote:
saskmommyof2 answered this one properly


Oops
I just realised this quote implies that her other answers weren't right, which isn't the case at all! Sorry, saskmommyof2. All your answers are great! I'm not sure what I meant to say when I typed this. Possibly that you took the words out of my mouth/keyboard?

_________________
11yo boy - peanuts nuts chickpeas
8yo daughter - peanuts, nuts, mustard, eggs, sunflowers (new! ), oral allergy syndrome
husband - pollen of all kinds
me - seafood,, oral allergy syndrome


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Aug 15, 2006 9:12 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Sep 22, 2005 11:39 pm
Posts: 1141
Location: saskatchewan, canada
Cleo,

Quote:
I just realised this quote implies that her other answers weren't right


I actually had never looked at it like that at all. I took it as a compliment :wink: .

_________________
DD age 9 1/2 -peanuts, nuts,
DD age 7 1/2 - milk, eggs, chicken, peanuts, treenuts, cats, dogs,
DS age 2 1/2
Husband- asthma, eggs, treenuts, fish, shellfish environmental
Self - penicillan, eurithromiacin, mild laytex allergy.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 52 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next

All times are UTC - 4 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group