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PostPosted: Fri Jan 20, 2012 10:06 pm 
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Joined: Mon Apr 18, 2011 2:20 pm
Posts: 150
Location: Barrie Ontario Canada
I am now supply teaching in my local board and have come to realize something that I think all of you should be aware of. Not all supply teachers know about allergies in the school or the class they will be in. This information seems to be up to the classroom teacher. Some classes I go into there will be a note right on the lesson plans saying "______ has an allergy to _____ epipen is in ______". Other classes there is a note on the door saying "allergy alert" then in the notes telling me who and where the epi is. Sometimes there will be a note about an allergy a child has but nothing about where the epi is and other times there is nothing. Most of the time if I know (either by a note posted or in a book) I will ask the child in question to come see me privately and where the epi is but when I don't know I am left in the dark.

What really gets me is when I enter a school I am given a binder with safety plans for students who either get physical and injure themselves or others or have a tendency to leave the building or classroom without permission. But these books do not contain anything about medical information. I have to read this binder and sign to say I read and understood the information given. This should be the same for medical information. The only thing I would change is have it in the classroom and available to be referred to throughout the day instead of having to read and try to remember all the information when I arrive then never see it again. Either way I think it is just as important to know about medical information as it is to know about behaviour information.

I wanted to make you all aware of this so that you could check with your teacher to see what is left for a supply teacher about your child. Does the supply know who your child is, what your child is allergic to, what to do and where the epi is!? All teachers in my board are trained on anaphylaxis and how to use the epipen and twinject but that is as far as it goes. Other boards may differ in their procedures on training and notifying but I thought this might be something for you all to know and think about.

_________________
Sarah
Outgrew: Wheat, corn, egg, chicken, to name a few
Sensitive to Milk/Dairy products
Allergic to: Tree nuts, percocet, toradol, environmental allergies and chemical allergies
Migraines caused by scented products, barometric pressure


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 21, 2012 8:34 am 
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Site Admin

Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6456
Location: Ottawa
Good point and one to bring up at the Individual Anaphylaxis Plan meetings. :thumbsup

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Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 21, 2012 7:56 pm 
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Joined: Sun Nov 30, 2008 11:00 am
Posts: 1119
Our Principal has sent out another reminder to teachers to let substitutes know about the "No eating food in the classroom" rule --- one sub was eating one of my child's allergens while walking around the classroom and touching my child's binder. This is not an allergen where cross contamination is a concern (must ingest for bad reaction) but it is still unnerving. Any contact would produce hives.

I think it is a fine line for schools with medical information because it is a "need to know" basis even with permanent staff. Although love the idea of a binder in the classroom I understand why they don't let it out of the office.

_________________
me: allergic to crustaceans plus environmental
teenager: allergic to hazelnuts, some other foods and environmental


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 23, 2012 11:07 am 
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Joined: Sun Oct 25, 2009 4:24 pm
Posts: 190
Location: B.C.
I am presently a substitute teacher, (Teacher On Call is the term in BC) as well as the parent of an anaphylactic daughter. When I receive a callout ( a machine calls) some schools have a message telling you that this is a peanut/nutfree school. Others tell you not to wear perfumes or bring fish.
This is a helpful step however when you arrive at a school it can be more of a challenge to know which student to specifically watch for. There is usually a posting in the school either in the copy room or medical room with pictures to match which allergies/medical conditions. Some teachers have a page and a TOC book on their desk or shelf. This seems to vary with the teacher. It would be really helpful if it was standard.
It would also be helpful to have student teachers receiving clear, consistent information regarding food allergies. I still encounter situations where candy is used as a reward. I have found that having students earn points for cooperative behaviour in order to end the day with a game is much more effective and poses no risks.
When my daughter was in elementary school I was a stay-at-home mom. I was able to take her to school myself and to volunteer in the school regularly. When I saw that there was a new substitute I made sure I communicated in a supportive manner.
We have come a long way but there is more we can do.


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 23, 2012 11:37 am 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6456
Location: Ottawa
In my daughter's school, all children with medical conditions have a poster in the teachers lounge/copy room. It shows a recent photo of the student their medical condition and any other pertinent information.
Dd says the same poster is in her classroom and it also lists her address and phone number. We will be asking the school to remove that info next year. They have it on file and don't need it in the classroom.
She's had at least one boy say he's going to call her and that he got the number off the poster... :freak

_________________
Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 23, 2012 11:32 pm 
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Joined: Sun Oct 25, 2009 4:24 pm
Posts: 190
Location: B.C.
There are privacy issues with posting pictures. Even putting these in the staff room means that visitors to the school and other parents and students have access to the information. Many schools have a medical binder. Today the teacher I filled in for had a list of all of the medical need kids on the lesson plan. This began with the allergic students and included the location of the epipen. I appreciated her thoroughness.


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