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 Post subject: Hidden Corn
PostPosted: Wed Apr 11, 2007 11:02 am 
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Joined: Fri Sep 09, 2005 5:15 pm
Posts: 365
Location: Regina, Sask
The following items can/do contain hidden corn:

Pectin and Fruit Pectin (dextrose is added as a stabilizer) - confirmed by Golden Valley Foods

Iodized Salt - contains dextrose and/or invert sugar as well as corn derived anti-caking agents

Cultures - any foods that contain cultures (grown on corn)

Enrichments - corn oil and corn starch are used as the carrier

Food colouring - caramel colour, as well as others are made from corn

Artificial and "Natural" Flavourings - I don't trust any of these...I have had major reactions

Sugar - not identified as cane or beet (Rogers Sugar confirmed beet sugar)

Canned and frozen fruits and vegetables - citric acid is often used as a wash in the preparation of foods to retain colour and freshness. Fresh is best!

***Please note that ingredients of ingredients do NOT have to appear on a label.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue May 08, 2007 5:11 pm 
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Joined: Fri Sep 09, 2005 5:15 pm
Posts: 365
Location: Regina, Sask
Cooking sprays can contain corn oil and/or corn alcohol. One more reason to avoid eating out in a restaurant. Cooking sprays are often used for easy clean-up as well as low calorie cooking. I have had major "accidental" reactions to cooking sprays. You would think that grilled "fresh" vegetables would be safe...unfortunately, the grill had been sprayed with cooking spray! :o(


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jul 26, 2007 7:07 pm 
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Joined: Sun Oct 08, 2006 10:53 am
Posts: 207
Location: Winnipeg, MB
I worked in a kitchen where they used corn starch to stop grated cheese from sticking together - like for pizza & lasagna. That's one I wouldn't have thought of if I was corn allergic.

_________________
adult son allergic to peanuts, most tree nuts, eggs and penicillin.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jul 29, 2007 11:43 pm 
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Joined: Mon Apr 09, 2007 5:58 pm
Posts: 68
I can have hard boiled eggs at a restaurant if I am trapped with no other place to eat safely.

My food orders always sound odd. I sometimes risk a piece of bread not toasted or buttered to go with my hard boiled eggs and some water.

If I am lucky they have Watermellon or Cantelope.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jul 30, 2007 4:14 pm 
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Joined: Fri Sep 09, 2005 5:15 pm
Posts: 365
Location: Regina, Sask
Bread has corn in it. I wouldn't risk even one slice of bread. I have ordered a plain baked potato. A peeled potato cut in to chunks and nuked is good enough for me. Fresh salads are ok...(just ask about any commercial washes or citric acid washes) with a fresh lemon wedge. Make sure that their salads don't come pre-washed and out of a bag. And yes, hard boiled eggs are about the safest thing to order in a restaurant.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jul 30, 2007 4:34 pm 
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Joined: Mon Apr 09, 2007 5:58 pm
Posts: 68
Restaurants don't understand "plain baked potato". Mine always comes covered in salt and butter or oil if ordered in a restaurant.

Due to another disability I am not allowed to have much salt.

Butter and oil contain multiple food allergens for me.

I have found breads without Corn in it. True Italian, Sourdough, and French bread. However, restaurant's bread does always contain Corn.

For me the Corn containing bread is less harmful than a salted buttered potato.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Aug 14, 2007 6:17 pm 
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Joined: Fri Sep 09, 2005 5:15 pm
Posts: 365
Location: Regina, Sask
I just went through my rather extensive corn allergy file and found the site that explains the use of citric acid (and other corny stuff) on shelled nuts:

<<Commercially-packaged nuts are often treated with ethylene gas, fumigated with methyl bromide, dipped in hot lye or a solution of glycerine and sodium carbonate to loosen their skins, and then rinsed in citric acid. >>

http://homecooking.about.com/od/nuts/a/walnuts_3.htm

Nuts "in the shell" are totally safe...that is, unless you are allergic to nuts. Sometimes I'll shell a bunch while watching tv and then bag them and throw them into the freezer for quick use (i.e. buckwheat/chocolate/hazelnut cookies...YUM!)


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 Post subject: BioBags Made from Corn!
PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2007 11:36 am 
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Joined: Fri Sep 09, 2005 5:15 pm
Posts: 365
Location: Regina, Sask
BEWARE of products such as this one!

http://www.drugstore.com/products/prod. ... ST-0-BRAND


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jan 07, 2008 10:55 am 
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Joined: Fri Sep 09, 2005 5:15 pm
Posts: 365
Location: Regina, Sask
I thought I should mention that coffee can be a problem for people with corn allergy. Instant coffee is a definite NO, but I am referring to ground/whole bean coffees here. I must have tried 20 different (organic, whole bean, ground, european, etc.) kinds of coffee and always had a reaction (skin). I have had to stop drinking coffee...sigh... According the the international CODEX list of allowed additives, there are 122 "allowed" additives for coffee (many of which are corn derived). So, if you are highly sensitive and cannot figure out why you are still reacting, try stopping coffee for a while. Tea is also a problem...I am able to drink Messmer Herbal teas from Germany with no problem.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jan 07, 2008 4:44 pm 
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Joined: Fri Dec 22, 2006 12:52 am
Posts: 214
I sometimes risk the undeclared corn just because I have conflicting allergies which are much more severe. For example, I have a nut allergy and cross-react to raw tree fruits. I had a major anaphylactic reaction to raw apples. So for me, fresh is NOT best, and I have so far not reacted to citric acid, so I still will eat canned fruit.

What bothers me is when they ruin an otherwise acceptable food with unnecessary corn additions. For example, I finally saw applesauce-in-a-tube at Loblaw's, and the ingredients were apples, cinnamon, pear puree and cornstarch. Why is the cornstarch necessary? You could have made the product just fine without it!

I actually have a feeling that corn is going to be the next big 'diet' issue, like there was that whole low-carb fad, there may be a no-corn fad. They are going to come out with a trendy diet book that blames the whole obesity crisis on high-fructose corn syrup and low-nutrition, highly processed corn additives, and there will be a glut of products on the market which will proudly bear the label 'corn-free.'

_________________
Asthma and eczema
Drug allergy (succinylcholine)
Food (corn, raw apples, green beans, tree nuts, flax)
Misc (pollen, grass, mold, dogs, cats)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 08, 2008 11:39 am 
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Joined: Fri Sep 09, 2005 5:15 pm
Posts: 365
Location: Regina, Sask
There are already so called "corn-free" products out there which means absolutely nothing to people with corn allergy. This usually means that there is no discernible amount of corn "protein" in it. Corn allergy is different from other allergies since it isn't always necessary for a corn protein to be present in order for a reaction to occur. I will have a MUCH worse reaction to things like citric acid, ascorbic acid, propylene glycol, flavourings,etc. than I do with say corn flour. Since my reactions are very skin related...I can "see" a reaction within one to two hours of ingesting a corn derivative.


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 18, 2008 6:06 pm 
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Joined: Fri Sep 09, 2005 5:15 pm
Posts: 365
Location: Regina, Sask
Here is an article about the use of organic acids used on fresh meat:

http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m ... i_17084838

<<<The application of citric acid and other acidulants has also been approved to delay discoloration and preserve a fresh color and appearance of fresh beef and lamb cuts. Citric acid, sodium citrate, ascorbic acid, erythorbic acid and sodium ascorbate are permitted.>>>

Please NOTE that all of the above organic acids are now commercially made from corn. They don't HAVE to be...but, from my own experience with store-bought fresh meat...they definitely ARE. It took me forever to figure out that it was the store-bought fresh meat I was eating that was causing my reactions which were mostly skin related (very painful and unsightly). I still have the scars! I'm doing great now with my farm beef and chicken.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Feb 06, 2008 12:45 pm 
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Joined: Fri Sep 09, 2005 5:15 pm
Posts: 365
Location: Regina, Sask
This explains why so many people with corn allergy have a problem with yeast:

http://www.foodnavigator.com/news/ng.as ... ast-leader


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2008 1:54 am 
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Joined: Fri Dec 22, 2006 12:52 am
Posts: 214
That's really interesting, Eldi. I found that about the time my corn issues started, I stopped being okay with bread. I can eat tortilla bread or other flatbread-type things, but loaf bread makes me really itchy. I could never figure out why. Now I know, I guess :)[/i]

_________________
Asthma and eczema
Drug allergy (succinylcholine)
Food (corn, raw apples, green beans, tree nuts, flax)
Misc (pollen, grass, mold, dogs, cats)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Feb 29, 2008 3:04 pm 
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Joined: Fri Sep 09, 2005 5:15 pm
Posts: 365
Location: Regina, Sask
During my on-going research about corn allergy I came across this site that explains the use of corn oil and other corn derivatives in fortified milk. Someone once told me that they put anti-freeze into milk and I was sure they were wrong. This site, however, confirms the use of "propylene glycol" (anti-freeze) as one of the components of the vitamin carrier for some milk. Either way...water or oil based vitamins...there is still corn in your milk...(propylene glycol is made from corn).

Polysorbate 80 is also made from corn. It's no wonder I was having such horrendous reactions to milk!

http://www.patentstorm.us/patents/54806 ... ption.html


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