You are viewing Allergic Living Canada | Switch to United States

Talking Allergies

* FAQ    * Search
* Login   * Register
It is currently Thu Apr 24, 2014 6:04 am

All times are UTC - 4 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 4 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Peanut free hospitals
PostPosted: Thu Nov 08, 2007 11:50 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 30, 2006 2:30 pm
Posts: 41
Location: barrie, Ontario
I think it would be wonderful if there was a regulation for hospitals to be peanut free. it doesn't make sense to me that the place you take your child to for a simple treatment could end up actually making them worse because of an allergic reaction to peanuts.
I know at our hospital there are all kinds of peanut products in the vending machines and even peanut butter in the cafeteria.
It would be scary to have to wait in emergency for hours knowing that someone could be eating a peanut butter cup from the vending machine infront/behind/beside my daughter.
I think I'll have to write another letter to our hospital, the last letter I wrote they said it would be addressed at a meeting but I never heard back and got busy and didn't follow up on it.

_________________
luvmikids

daughter allergic to dairy,eggs,peanuts, soy, intolerance for potatoes, whole wheat


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Nov 09, 2007 7:43 am 
Offline
Site Admin

Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6429
Location: Ottawa
We are fortunate here in Ottawa that we have CHEO (Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario). They are very allergen aware and I would have no problem feeding our daughter after speaking with the food service staff. Their coffee shop has foods which she is able to eat for visits and they practice strict procedures to avoid cross contamination.
That being said they do also sell products which contain her allergens. I'm not sure about the peanut because prior to the last visit she did not have a peanut allergy.
I would advise everyone to not hesitate to seek necessary medical treatment and to carry the auto-injector everywhere including hospitals. If a reaction happened, give epinephrene and alert the staff.
You would be in the right place.

_________________
Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Nov 15, 2007 2:39 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2005 8:55 pm
Posts: 412
Location: Vancouver, BC
Seven years ago, Aaron had an anaphylactic reaction to peanuts and was taken to our Children's Hospital and when he was waiting to be told he could go home, one of the nurses offered him a popsicle, which he took and started eating, and then another nurse came and said "Yikes, that may contain peanuts!", and took it away. I had not commented on the first nurse giving him the popsicle, cos I figured if there was anywhere his allergies would be understood, it would be a hospital emergency ward, especially as he was reacting to peanut, I thought that some system would be in place, as they are so used to feeding people. Anyway, I assumed they were a safe brand, and did not question her feeding him.

I wrote and phoned to suggest they stock a safe brand, and I never heard anything back, but when I went to the emergency ward the next time, they had a sign right on the door of the fridge to say the popsicles may contain traces of nuts, so at least that was something.

But it goes to show that no matter where you are, you still have to keep the same rules and never assume that others understand the precautions you take.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Nov 15, 2007 9:54 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Apr 16, 2005 12:09 am
Posts: 1054
I've had the same experience Pam. He was offered one once by an admitting nurse, we were there for something non-allergy related and it was only after he had popsicle in hand, that I thought to read the label (we were new to allergies at the time) and the second time was after his anaphylactic reaction -- but I was prepared this time because of our first experience. The doctor was extremely apologetic, and realized the magnitude of her error and began telling Ethan that he should never take any food from anyone until mom or dad has read the label. We ended up going home and getting a safe one for him as we weren't too far from hospital. It's true, you can never let your guard down.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 4 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 4 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group