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PostPosted: Mon Jan 07, 2008 7:53 pm 
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Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2005 8:55 pm
Posts: 412
Location: Vancouver, BC
I will contact a coroner in my area and find out how to go about this.

What would we be asking for - a finding of anaphylaxis based on history and factors leading to death (ate allergen), as well as physical findings?

Let's all brainstorm about it, and then create a plan on how to go about it.


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 07, 2008 10:44 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6456
Location: Ottawa
According to Anaphylaxis Canada:
http://www.anaphylaxis.org/content/prog ... deaths.asp

[/quote]There is also a need to establish a formal Canadian registry of anaphylaxis deaths through each provincial coroner's office. [quote]

Perhaps we can do something to this effect. It may be hard to say that the person died of anaphylaxis but it could be a contributing factor.

I am trying to figure out the Coroner's Act (dry stuff really).

_________________
Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 08, 2008 7:49 am 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6456
Location: Ottawa
No time to read today but I am trying to determine what the current system for documenting and accounting for death in Canada is. (My technique is a bit hap-hazard as I don't always know the proper phrasing and Google has taken me to some strange websites :roll: )
So far I have found these which seem promising, I'll try to read them at lunch. What are your thoughts, anyone?

http://www.bdlc.umontreal.ca/CHMD/index.htm
Quote:
The Canadian Human Mortality Database (CHMD) was created to provide detailed Canadian mortality and population data to researchers, students, journalists, policy analysts, and others interested in the history of human longevity. The project is an achievement of the Mortality and Longevity research team at the Department of Demography, Université de Montréal, under the supervision of Professor Robert Bourbeau, in collaboration with demographers at the Max Plank Institute for Demographic Research (Rostock, Germany) and the Department of Demography, University of California at Berkeley. Nadine Ouellette, a Ph.D. Student and member of the Mortality and Longevity research team, is in charge of computing all CHMD life tables and updating the CHMD web site.

The CHMD is a “satellite” of the Human Mortality Database (HMD), an international database which currently holds detailed data for 31 countries or regions. Consequently, the CHMD’s underlying methodology corresponds to the one used for the HMD.



and

http://www.fcsm.gov/99papers/fair.pdf

Quote:
The increasing capacity of users to incorporate statistical information in their decision-making
and research challenges statistical agencies to improve the quality and breadth of their
information. This increasing demand is also accompanied by a rapidly changing technological
environment and the increasing skill of the workforce for bringing together and analyzing data.
For example, vital statistics, census, administrative and survey data are used for a multiplicity of
purposes, and data are integrated from a number of different sources. One important tool to
achieve the integration of these data is by computerized record linkage. Record linkage is the
bringing together of two or more records, usually in order to match up those records relating to
the same individual, family, event or entity. This paper will examine some of the practical
methods developed at Statistics Canada to improve the searching, comparison and grouping of
records in a typical generalized linkage process. Some background is also provided as to why
record linkage of health data is needed, and some of the current initiatives that are furthering this
work in Canada.

_________________
Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 15, 2008 2:15 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
My first thought is to try to contact the people in charge of the CHMD and ask them what they think of our proposal.

K.

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


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