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PostPosted: Thu Sep 16, 2010 3:01 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jun 26, 2007 2:45 pm
Posts: 805
Location: Vancouver, BC
I was at a meeting yesterday where they were discussing the BC government's idea of having the school boards provide free and universal Pre K within a few years. This is in response to an interest in 'early learning' and how vulnerable children are already behind when they start K at age 5, so they want to get to these children at an earlier age.

Two groups, those representing Early Childhood Educators and a Coalition of Child Care Advocates gave a presentation showing what they wanted the partnership to look like, and recommendations for integrating Pre K, out of school care, and day care with this initiative and the role of existing preschools and daycares.

While I was there as a board member of a preschool, I started thinking about difficulties many parents have had finding a daycare/preschool for their allergic child, so I brought this up. Because of the ministerial order in BC that school boards must have an anaphylaxis management plan, etc, I'm assuming that once this system is implemented and the school boards are responsible for these new 'early learning centres', there would be procedures in place that would be similar to those at the school level.

The presenters said that anaphylactic children would be seen as any other child requiring extra support and would be accommodated in the same way. However, the difference is that allergic children are not designated by the ministry as 'special needs' and do not have any funding allotted to them for extra staff. I'm thinking there should be a standard allergy component of their first aid training that would be required of all staff.

Currently, at our preschool, the teachers get the public health nurse to come in and train them on symptoms, avoidance and autoinjectors, but I know of other preschools who will not accept students at risk for anaphylaxis!

Anyone with experience in this area or advice to share?

_________________
DD 2004 Allergy to peanuts, egg, sesame, and new: lentils and chick peas
DS 2006 Allergy to peanuts, tree nuts, milk, egg, kiwi fruit, eczema


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 16, 2010 3:52 pm 
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Joined: Fri Oct 10, 2008 9:40 pm
Posts: 2034
Location: ottawa
I'll see what I can find from the Ontario sites regarding Jr. K here. Being that it (Jr.K) is taught in our schools staff are all trained each school year. I had never even heard of Jr. K until we moved here a few years ago. Our son will start next fall.

_________________
DD 12 yrs -no allergies
4 yr old DS - asthma/eczema Anaphylactic to Peanuts, all tree nuts, sesame , all pea/lentil legumes, gelatin.
Allergic to trees, grass,ragweed, feathers, dander, mold and dust.
Outgrew eggs, fish, shellfish


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 17, 2010 5:18 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jun 26, 2007 2:45 pm
Posts: 805
Location: Vancouver, BC
Thanks BC. I'm particularly concerned about the existing daycare centres getting up to speed if they don't currently have allergic children. I'm wondering if there's some sort of standard training that could be given to the teachers.

_________________
DD 2004 Allergy to peanuts, egg, sesame, and new: lentils and chick peas
DS 2006 Allergy to peanuts, tree nuts, milk, egg, kiwi fruit, eczema


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 18, 2010 9:05 am 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6479
Location: Ottawa
Quote:
Division 3 — Illnesses

Medication
53 (1) If a licensee has agreed with a parent to give a child any medication prescribed by a medical practitioner or provided by the parent, the licensee and his or her employees must ensure that the medication is

(a) administered to the child in the amount and at the times specified by the child's parent or in the child's record or care plan, and

(b) readily accessible to employees.

(2) A licensee must ensure that a child's medication is not accessible to any child, except that a child may have access to his or her own medication if

(a) the child's parent has instructed the licensee to permit this, and

(b) the nature of the child's medication is such that, without immediate access to the medication by the child, the child's health will be significantly at risk.

(3) A licensee must ensure that at all times an employee is available who is competent to either

(a) administer a child's medication as instructed by the child's parent or required by the child's record or care plan, or

(b) if, by the parent's instructions or under the child's care plan, the child is permitted to self-administer the medication, supervise the administration of a child's medication.

(4) A licensee must ensure that an employee who supervises a child who self-administers medication documents the administration of the medication in the child's care plan.

Child who becomes ill
54 If a child becomes ill while under the care of the licensee, a licensee must

(a) provide in the community care facility a quiet and clean resting area for the child, and

(b) ensure that the child is under the close supervision of a responsible adult.

Notification of illness or injury
55 (1) A licensee must immediately notify a parent or emergency contact if, while under the care or supervision of the licensee, the child

(a) becomes ill or is injured, or

http://www.bclaws.ca/EPLibraries/bclaws ... #section13

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Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 18, 2010 8:01 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jun 26, 2007 2:45 pm
Posts: 805
Location: Vancouver, BC
Thanks Susan. Later on the regulations it also talks about First Aid training needing to include common childhood conditions including allergic reactions.

I'm guessing that while these regulations are in place, there are children being turned away from daycare centres who are 'too high risk', or where the centre is unwilling or unable to accommodate due to many food restrictions. There are also instances of where the centre is willing to accept the child, but unwilling to abide by rules the parents want the centre to adopt to keep the child safe.

_________________
DD 2004 Allergy to peanuts, egg, sesame, and new: lentils and chick peas
DS 2006 Allergy to peanuts, tree nuts, milk, egg, kiwi fruit, eczema


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