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PostPosted: Wed Nov 15, 2006 8:24 pm 
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Joined: Thu Aug 24, 2006 1:42 am
Posts: 222
Location: Victoria, British Columbia
I know this isn't about food, but I found this on cbc.ca
http://www.cbc.ca/news/background/health/labels-cosmetics.html
The article has more of a bend toward known carcinogens, but I think it will be useful for us allergic folk as well.

And while I am talking about cosmetic labels, has anyone else noticed a tiny drawings of a cylinder - think tuna can -- on some of their products that say "3 mos" or '1 year"? I am assuming that means it should be used within that time period. Very useful as well!

Caroline

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son anaphylactic to peanuts


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 16, 2006 10:04 am 
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Joined: Sun Mar 05, 2006 1:05 pm
Posts: 528
Location: Burlington, Ontario
Wow! The list of "Hot Ingrediets" is extremely long!!

Also, it says to report any adverse reactions:

Quote:
If you have an adverse reaction to a cosmetic, stop using the product immediately. Call your doctor if the reaction is severe or prolonged, and report the reaction to your local federal product safety office.


I think all the ingredients should be listed on all the products.

Thanks for the link, Caroline2.

_________________
15 year old - asthmatic, allergic to cats, dogs, horses, waiting to be "officially" diagnosed for anaphylaxis
12 year old - asthmatic, allergic to tree pollen and mold, OAS
Husband - Allergic to amoxycillin
Self - Allergic to housework only


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 20, 2006 7:48 pm 
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Joined: Mon Nov 20, 2006 7:30 pm
Posts: 19
Location: Burnaby, BC
By November 18, 2006, the outer label of all cosmetics sold in Canada must contain a list of all ingredients. In addition, the list must use recognized names from the International Nomenclature of Cosmetic Ingredients (INCI) system, as found in the International Cosmetic Ingredient Dictionary and Handbook. This naming system is already in use in the United States, the European Union, Japan and many other countries.

For further information: http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/iyh-vsv/prod/cosmet_prod_e.html

Should you wish to report an incident or complaint with regards to a cosmetic product, contact information for your Health Canada Product Safety Office can be found at:

http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/home-accueil/con ... -yt_e.html

Lance Hill

[Edited by moderator so that URLs work]

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Lance Hill
Regional Food Liaison Officer
Health Canada


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 20, 2006 9:49 pm 
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Joined: Sat Apr 16, 2005 12:09 am
Posts: 1054
Thanks Lance -- that's very helpful!


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 23, 2006 9:57 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2005 6:39 pm
Posts: 2928
Location: Toronto
Hi Lance,

Thanks for stopping in - we always appreciate some expert advice.

For those interested in the new cosmetics labelling, Allergic Living also wrote an article on them on page 41 of the Fall 2006 issue. I'll try to remember to put that article up on the website as well.

One caution Health Canada gave us - there is a phase-in period for the new labels; they won't affect products that are already out on pharmacy and dept. store shelves.

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Allergic to soy, peanut, shellfish, penicillin


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 Post subject: labels on shampoos
PostPosted: Wed Dec 27, 2006 9:14 pm 
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Joined: Thu Aug 24, 2006 1:42 am
Posts: 222
Location: Victoria, British Columbia
I was waiting for a friend in a Shopper's Drug Mart when I got a lookin' in the shampoo aisle. I tell you, if you can think of a food, it seems to be there in a shampoo or a body wash. What has SHOCKED me, though, is the number of products with the most common allergens: soy, sesame, nuts, almonds to name a few. I tried to read the labels for a warning -- to see if it were just simulated fragrance and not the real deal -- but the printing on most products is really teeny tiny without that bolded announcement of the common allergens. But I do wonder -- will these products have to declare if they are made in the same facility as common allergens? And I also wonder -- if there is an 'unknown' reaction after a swim or at the office, will we be able to trace back to products like these? Food is one thing, but I don't know if I can let myself think of the implications of stuff like this. I guess it is not new (think Body Shop) so will not freak myself out . . . but, Lance, if you have any insight into the manufacturing and labeling of non-food products that contain common allergens, could you let us know?

:shock: Caroline2 :shock:


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 28, 2006 5:02 pm 
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Joined: Mon Nov 20, 2006 7:30 pm
Posts: 19
Location: Burnaby, BC
I am not familar with the manufacture of cosmetics but do not believe the process will be much different than for food products. Should the allergic shopper encounter a cosmetic product for which there are multiple types/fragrances in the same container size you should assume they are produced on shared equipment; the same as you would for various flavours of a food product. Before an anaphylactic individual uses one of these products they need to consider the potential for cross-contamination. In the case of food, the product label may carry a precautionary statement to alert the allergic individual to the potential presence of life-threatening allergens, e,g. "may contain...". I am not aware of any similar mechanism at this point in time for cosmetic products.

One can also consider the form of the product, is it liquid, powder, sticky... can equipment be effectively cleaned? Difficult questions for the allergic shopper but something that needs to be taken in to consideration.

As the allergic shopper has been doing quite successfully with the food industry over the last several years, questions needed to be directed to the manufacturer's and their associations. Asking questions will require companies to consider these issues, if they have not already done so. At the same time any incidents concerning a cosmetic product should be reported to the Health Canada Product Saftey Office as per the information posted earlier in this thread.

Another potential source of information:

Canadian Cosmetic, Toiletry and Fragrance Association
420 Britannia Road East, Suite 102
Mississauga, Ontario L4Z 3L5
Tel: (905) 890-5161
Fax: (905) 890-2607
Email: cctfa@cctfa.ca
http://www.cctfa.ca/en/cctfa/index.htm

Yes, I think the ingredient declarations on cosmetics will permit more informed decisions on the part of the allergic shopper. It will also initially trigger many questions regarding protein content of ingredients and the potential for cross-contamination. The disclosure of cosmetic ingredients should help avoid reactions. As the policies and mechanisms for dealing with food allergens have developed over the last dozen years I believe we may, depending how successful ingredient disclosure is in mitigating adverse reactions to cosmetics, see a similar trend for additional policies and mechanisms for cosmetics.

_________________
Lance Hill
Regional Food Liaison Officer
Health Canada


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