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 Post subject: corn allergies
PostPosted: Fri Mar 04, 2005 12:37 am 
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Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 5:39 pm
Posts: 2
Is anyone else allergic to corn?

I'm looking for a list of the ingredients/processes that corn where is used (in any form) so I know what to avoid. I react severely to even the smallest amounts, and sometimes it takes some real investigation to figure out where the corn came from. I now know that baking powder (unless otherwise specified) contains corn starch and that paper plates are usually dusted with corn starch. What I'm looking for is a litst of uses like this, plus all the ingredient names that are code words for corn (like malt). Is there a list like this somewhere on the web?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Mar 04, 2005 5:03 pm 
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Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 9:10 pm
Posts: 121
Location: Charlottesville, VA
The AvoidingCorn forum at DelphiForums might be useful for you--they're quite active. There are also some corn allergy discussion groups at YahooGroups. They're very informative and useful.

I'm not allergic to corn, but my skin has issues with HFCS. For a few months, my husband was (mis)diagnosed with a corn allergy, so we avoided it as much as possible, to the extent of changing our facial tissues and toilet paper brands! The delphi group is a very good starting off place and you might very well find it suits all of your needs.

ygg


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 Post subject: corn allergy
PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2005 1:14 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 6:53 pm
Posts: 1454
Location: Canada
I'm allergic to corn, but it isn't a serious allergy for me. Still, I need to avoid corn and products with corn starch.

Much to my dismay, the corn allergy explains why I get hives with popcorn (I was in denial about the popcorn allergy for awhile.)

I find the book Dealing with Food Allergies by Janice Vickerstaff to be really helpful.

She notes that (besides the obvious foods) corn may be found in:
baking powder, vegetable gum, vegetable paste, food starch, modified starch, vegetable starch, vegetable protein, starch. Hydrolyzed plant protein, textured vegetable protein, and hydrolyzed vegetable protein (sometimes referred to as HPP, HVP, TVP) can contain corn, but this protein is highly processed and is unlikely to cause a reaction (although people who are severely allergic should probably avoid these foods too).

sometimes dextrose and sorbitol is from corn too, although sugars and alcohol derived from corn is usually not allergenic (although again, if you are severely allergic you should avoid these too since they could contain trace amounts of protein.)

Nestle's "Breakfast Anytime" instant breakfast drinks have undeclared corn products at least in Canada. (I called the company to check.) It's a bit ironic that they would not declare all possible allergens in spite of the fact that they are trying to market themselves as an allergy-friendly company. (I noticed, for instance, that they are sponsoring the Allergic Living site.) However, the person with whom I spoke on the phone was really helpful.

I really think that allergists should provide these lists for their patients. None of the ones I have been to offer much in the way of basic information.

Hope this helps!
Lisa


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Mar 28, 2005 11:04 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6476
Location: Ottawa
From "My Kid's Allergic to Everything" Dessert Cookbook by Mary Harris and Wilma Nachsin

Baking Powder - most baking powders have added cornstarch to keep the powder dry and free-pouring.
Substiute any of the following for each 1 teaspoon baking powder used in a recipe:
1/2 tsp cream of tarter and 1/2 tsp baking soda
or
1 tsp Featherweight baking powder or any brand that is cereal-free (has no cornstarch)
or
1 tsp cream of tarter, 1 tsp bicarbonate of soda and 1/2 tsp salt (combine for each 1 cup flour used in the recipe)

Chocolate - most milk chocolates and some carob products may use corn syrup sweetener. Check the ingredients list carefully.
Pure baking chocolate and pure cocoa may not be allergic.

Confectioners' Sugar- Finely ground cane sugar. It comes from the Grass family. Commercial cinfectioners' sugars have added cornstarch to ensure a dry and free-flowing product. This is sometimes called powdered sugar.
Homemade Confectioners' sugar:
Slowly pour granulated sugar 1/4 cup at a time into the top opening of blender or food processor already going on high speed. Empty blender or food processor after each 1/4 cup is ground. One 1/2 cup granulated sugar will yeild a haping 1/2 cup confectioners' sugar. Use the amount called for in the recipe.

Cornstarch - A corn derivative normally used as a thickener.
Substitue one of the following:

Arrowroot powder, flour or starch - (dried ground tuber). Use 2/3 tbsp arrowroot fr each 1 tbsp cornstarch used in the recipe

Kudzu or Kudu powder - From the root of the kudzu vine (Bean family). Sift out lumps, then dissolve the sifted powder in a small amount of cold water before using. Use 1/3 to 1/2 tbsp kudzu for each 1 tbsp cornstarch used in the recipe.

Potato flour - (Potato family)Use 1 tbsp potato flour for each 1 tbsp cornstarch used in recipe.

Potato starch - Dissolve in a small amount of cold water before using. Use 1 tbsp potato starch for each 1 tbsp cornstarch used in recipe.

Rice flour - (Grass family)Dissolve in a small amount of cold water before using. If possible prchase "Mochika" or "sweet" rice flour which is made from a waxier type of rice and thickens better with fewer lumps. Use 1 tbsp rice flour for each 1 tbsp cornstarch used in recipe.

Tapioca flour - (Spurge family)From the cooked, ground cassava root. Dissolve in a small amount of cold water before using. Use 4 tsp tapioca for each 1 tbsp cornstarch used in recipe.

Corn syrup - Substitute 1 cup granulated sugar melted over low heat with 1/4 cup water for each 1 cup of corn syrup called for in your recipe.

Margarine and oil - Use pure oils as corn is often used in vegetable oils.

Salt - Most commercial iodized table salts contain dextrose (a corn product) as a stabalizing ingredient. Sea sakts and "pickling" or "preserving" salts are dextrose free and work just as well as table salt for cooking and baking. Some manufacturers offer oidine-free table and cooking salts that do not contain dextrose. Kosher or "sour" salt is not an acceptable substitute fr baking desserts or to replace table salt.

Sweeteners-Granulated cane sugar is of the grass family and may cause allergic reactions.
Fruit sweeteners come in many forms. Granulated powdered, dried, pureed, juiced, juice concentrates, liquid, sauce and mashed.

Aquamill Beet sugar is the naturally sweet sap of the century or maguey plant of the Amaryllis family.

Barley malt is a thick syrup or powder simillar to maolasses. It is of the grass family.

Beet sugar is made from refined sugar beets and is of the Goosefoot family.

Brown sugars are made from granulated cane or beet sugar with molasses (from the sugar cane plant). Use equal amounts as granulated sugar in recipe.

Date sugar Fructose is from the Palm family. Use 2/3 cup blended dates or date sugar for each 1 cup of granulated sugar in recipe.

Fructose is fruit sugar and is twice as sweet as granulated cane sugar. See package directions for substitution information.

Fruit juices and concentrates must be thawed bfore using if frozen. Use full strength to replace the liquid in the recipe.

Honey is 2-2 1/2 time sweeter than granulated cane sugar. Raw, unfiltered, locally produced honey is usually best for people with allergies. Decrease liquid by 1/4 cup for each 1 cup of honey. For example if the recipe calls for 1 cup milk and 2 cups sugar; use 3/4 cup milk and 3/4 - 1 cup honey, to taste.

Maple syrup is with honey decreaes the liquid in the recipe by 1/4 cup fr each cup used. Use maple syrup in equal portions to granulated cane sugar.

Rice sugar, syrup or powder are of the Grass family. Use equivalent portions to the amount of granulated cane sugar in your recipe.

Stevia is available in powder of liquid. It is a very concentrated sweetener and you may want to disolve it in the recipes liquid for better distribution. Use approx 1/3 cup Stevia for each 1 cup granulated cane sugar.

Vanilla - most commercial vanillas extracts and flavourings have corn syrup added as a sweetener.

You can make your own vanilla extract by chopping 1 pound vanilla beans placing them in a large container and allowing them to steep in 1/2 gallon of any acceptable clear alcohol for at least 4 weeks. Then strain ut the beans and store in a tightly sealed jar.

White Vinegar- is distilled from a variety of grains, fruits and vegetables. Those with allergies to corn or potatoes can use cider vinegar with no worries. Since cider vinegar has a higher acidity level that is something to take into concideration when baking, cooking or baking.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Apr 13, 2005 11:53 am 
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Joined: Tue Apr 12, 2005 9:50 am
Posts: 205
Location: Canada
Yes corn is one of my mild allergies.
I do not eat true corn at all.
I stay away from corn syrup
I use to throw up from corn.
I have not eatten it for many years.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon May 23, 2005 9:39 am 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 6:53 pm
Posts: 1454
Location: Canada
See http://www.cornallergens.com/list.htm for a long, long list of corn-derived products.


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 Post subject: Post topic
PostPosted: Tue May 24, 2005 2:19 pm 
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Joined: Tue Apr 12, 2005 9:50 am
Posts: 205
Location: Canada
thank you Lisa


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 Post subject: avoiding corn in Canada
PostPosted: Wed Jun 22, 2005 4:51 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jun 22, 2005 4:46 pm
Posts: 2
There is a website specifically about how to avoid corn in Canada, where the labelling laws are different from those in the USA: "Avoiding Corn in Canada."

http://individual.utoronto.ca/scharf/cornpage.htm

This page contains information about what names derivatives of corn appear under, how to avoid corn in medications, finding corn-free food, tips for travelling in different countries, and more.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jun 22, 2005 6:32 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 6:53 pm
Posts: 1454
Location: Canada
Great website. Thanks!


Last edited by Helen on Mon Dec 04, 2006 11:40 am, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: corn allergy
PostPosted: Sun Sep 04, 2005 6:20 pm 
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Joined: Tue Aug 30, 2005 6:55 pm
Posts: 83
Location: Quispamsis NB
Hi, this is susieQ
When tested I showed mildly positive to corn under the cereal section. I was told not to worry about any of the mildy positive ones as most people are mildly allergic to something. I am,though, an anaphylactic to seafood. One thing I was never told was - does this corn allergy mean anything made from corn or its derivatives or just corn in cereal? If cereal corn, why am I not allergic to corn the vegetables itself? I know these questions may sound rother stupid, but my allergist is not very forthcoming in info. Does anyone have a thought on this? Thanks


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Sep 05, 2005 9:36 am 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 6:53 pm
Posts: 1454
Location: Canada
I've learned that those allergy tests aren't accurate. If one gets a positive skin test result to a food and there is no other reason to believe that one is allergic to that food, then the allergist will not recommend any diet changes.

On corn allergies, I found that site jumpysquid cited to be really useful. There is corn protein in corn syrup, glucose-fructose, etc. so some people have to avoid all corn-derived products. I find that I react to the grain---corn flour, corn, popcorn---but not to products with corn syrup in them. I've been avoiding corn-derived sugars anyways.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Sep 09, 2005 6:00 pm 
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Joined: Fri Sep 09, 2005 5:15 pm
Posts: 370
Location: Regina, Sask
Hi everyone... I am also severely allergic to corn and all corn derivatives. So severe, that even the corn oil carrier used to add the vitamins to milk causes a major skin reaction. Is anyone else here reacting to milk? What about fresh meat? Another recent discovery...they are putting corn derived organic acids on our "fresh" meat! I have been having a terrible time finding meat that I don't react to...


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Sep 10, 2005 8:49 am 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 6:53 pm
Posts: 1454
Location: Canada
I didn't know that about the meat or the milk---I don't react to either. I wonder if allergists know about this--someone could very well _seem_ to be allergic to everything and it could be just corn. Corn is so cheap it's everywhere....and we know that foods that tend to be everywhere tend to be the ones that people develop allergies to. That's why I like places like Whole Foods--the foods they sell are pure and simple (although I have no idea about the corn-derived oils in the milk.)

Speaking of places like Whole Foods, there are a lot of people out there who are *not* allergic to corn who think that corn is evil. You might have the most luck hanging out with people who buy non-genetically modified, organic foods and frequenting their shops :) I don't think that one can get corn these days that has not been genetically modified, so health food stores tend to have lots of products without any corn in them.

I don't know if Regina would have any alternative grocery stores that sell organic meat---if not, are there any places that sell meat produced by the Amish or Old Order Mennonites? (there's a place like that in Toronto too). Their meat would probably not have any added ingredients.

Again, to try to find milk without corn I would guess that your best bet would be to check with some manufacturers of organic milk. They might not want to have genetically modified corn in their product although they do add vitamin A and D. Otherwise, I would bet that plain yogurt would be fine.


Last edited by Helen on Mon Dec 04, 2006 11:42 am, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Sep 10, 2005 4:53 pm 
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Joined: Fri Sep 09, 2005 5:15 pm
Posts: 370
Location: Regina, Sask
I have checked into the milk...and ALL milk sold in Canada must be fortified. The vitamins added to the milk are in a corn oil carrier. I have checked with every dairy that sells in my area and all of the milk has corn oil in it. I was having major reactions to milk for many years without knowing why...since the corn oil is not listed as an ingredient. It is illegal to buy or sell unfortified milk in Canada. I have had numerous conversations with the people at Health Canada about this but since corn is not listed as one of the top 10 "recognized" allergens...they are not too concerned about it. I have tried to find a local farmer who would sell me milk, but with no luck. I am using unfortified organic soy milk right now...which is ok. As for the meat, I have no problem with chickens from local Hutterite Colonies. I am highly sensitive to the organic acids (derived from corn) which they are using on and even injecting into our fresh meat. I am looking into beef and pork from local farms as well. I wish we had a Whole Foods here, but unfortunately, we don't.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Sep 11, 2005 11:04 am 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 6:53 pm
Posts: 1454
Location: Canada
It's too bad that all the dairies in your area use corn. I would guess it is the cheapest oil so most people use it. I had never heard of this before, and I did an internet search. You might be interested in the following abstract on an article from the Journal of Dairy Science:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=3571615&dopt=Abstract

So it does sound like someone somewhere does use coconut oil as a carrier for Vit. A...but mind you, this study was done years ago (1987).

It's frustrating that manufacturers simply don't have to declare *all* ingredients. I suppose they weigh how expensive it would be to the manufacturers in relation to how many people would be affected. I don't understand why it is this way---the bottom line should be that people have a right to know what is in their food.


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