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 Post subject: Ice Cream Makers
PostPosted: Thu Jan 11, 2007 10:56 am 
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Joined: Thu Dec 21, 2006 5:25 pm
Posts: 83
Location: Orleans, Ontario
My son is allergic to dairy and soy. The only source of calcium he is getting is through rice milk, and the occasional supplement. We were thinking of getting an ice cream maker in the hope of making some with rice milk.

He loves gelato so this would be a great way to sneak more calcium in. I was looking at recipes and they all call for egg or egg yolk. Has anyone tried making ice cream with egg replacer? Do it turn out? What about making sorbet but using rice milk instead of the water? Would that work?

I guess I'm hoping to get some input before going out and purchasing an ice cream maker.

I appreciate any comments. Thanks
Smile

Denise :)

_________________
Oldest son 9: allergic to fish and shellfish, pollens, pets, mould and dustmites
Youngest son, 5: allergic to peanuts, nuts, dairy, eggs, sesame, kiwi, asthma, pollens, pets, mould and dustmites


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jan 11, 2007 12:19 pm 
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Joined: Tue Sep 12, 2006 8:25 pm
Posts: 233
Location: Winnipeg
We have an ice cream maker and use it all the time in the summer.
I'm sure the sorbet would work using rice milk in instead of water.
I've never tried using egg replacer in a gelato type recipe. I have used a tbsp. of cornstarch instead of the eggs to thicken the mixture.
Just make sure to chill your mixture really well before putting it in the machine for best results.

_________________
1 son allergic to eggs, peanuts, green peas, chick peas, lentils and tomatoes
(avoiding tree nuts and most other legumes too)
1 son allergic to eggs, and has outgrown peanuts
Both with many environmental allergies, asthma and eczema


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jan 11, 2007 12:25 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
I have a fantastic "ice cream" recipe that I use with a product called DariFree. My youngest loves it. We make vanilla, chocolate, and vanilla with safe chocolate chips (so far).

See http://www.vancesfoods.com/original.html for more details about this product.

DariFree is a potato-based milk substitute. Ingredients are:

Maltodextrin (from potatoes), Potato Starch, Natural Flavors (no MSG), Crystalline Fructose, Calcium Carbonate, colored with Titanium Dioxide (an inert mineral), Carrageenan, Dicalcium Phosphate, Salt, Tricalcium Phosphate, Potassium Citrate, Lactic Acid, Ascorbic Acid (Vitamin C), Alpha Tocopheryl Acetate (Vitamin E), Vitamin A Palmitate, Niacinamide (Vitamin B3), Calcium Pantothenate, Vitamin D3, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride (Vitamin B6), Riboflavin (Vitamin B2), Vitamin K1, Thiamin mononitrate (Vitamin B1), Cyanocobalamin (Vitamin B12), Biotin.

I'm not sure about the soy - sorry. You would know better than me if any of these terms indicate soy.

If you want me to bring some to the next meeting, Denise, let me know. My youngest usually drinks rice milk, but we use DariFree for hot chocolate as it just tastes better/creamier, and obviously we use it for the ice cream.

I order it from Winnipeg in large bags, but I think you can find it around Ottawa at some health food stores. I've also seen a liquid form also called English Bay DariFree at places like Rainbow Foods, but I don't think it's the same company (although it seems to be the same ingredients).

I can't post the recipe online because the creator has asked me not to, but I can send it to you in a PM or email.

I don't know if it would work with rice milk, but it might, as DariFree is sort of the same consistency as rice milk. Although DariFree seems to be a tiny bit creamier.

K.

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jan 11, 2007 12:33 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
Meant to also say, for those who can have dairy but not egg - we have a couple of very simple recipes that don't call for egg. I've never made ice cream with egg, to be honest. I thought I'd posted them but I can't see them. If someone wants some simple recipes with basically milk, cream, sugar and vanilla (and/or chocolate syrup), let me know.

Denise - I love the gelatos/sorbets that we make with our ice cream maker, and so does my youngest. They are easy and lovely, especially with the "Europe's Best" frozen fruit that you can get these days.

I think you could mix rice milk in with the ingredients to make a sort of "sherbet", couldn't you? That way he'd be getting some calcium. I should try that too!

K.

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2007 1:40 am 
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Joined: Wed Sep 27, 2006 12:36 am
Posts: 154
I have a cuisineart and love it. I've never made ice cream with egg! I highly recommend that one.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2007 7:18 am 
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Site Admin

Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6455
Location: Ottawa
Karen, in the ingredients you listed for Darifree you mentioned lactic acid. I always thought that was a milk product. Isn't it?
This product looks great!

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Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2007 9:45 am 
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Joined: Sun Mar 05, 2006 1:05 pm
Posts: 528
Location: Burlington, Ontario
There's also a product called Tayo, available at supermarkets. Here is their website:

http://www.tayofoods.com/win/flash/index.html

It does contain soy.

They also make a gelato.

_________________
15 year old - asthmatic, allergic to cats, dogs, horses, waiting to be "officially" diagnosed for anaphylaxis
12 year old - asthmatic, allergic to tree pollen and mold, OAS
Husband - Allergic to amoxycillin
Self - Allergic to housework only


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2007 10:35 am 
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Joined: Thu Dec 21, 2006 5:25 pm
Posts: 83
Location: Orleans, Ontario
Thank you all for your terrific input.

I went out and bought a Cuisinart and made my first batch this morning. I used half rice milk and half lite coconut milk and put in cornstarch instead of the egg to make a basic vanilla ice cream. It turned out delicious. My little one is on his third small cone!!

The Darifree product certainly looks interesting. It's not one I was familiar with. We won't be using the Tayo because of the soy

I'm excited about trying other flavors and playing around with ingredients.

Thanks again

_________________
Oldest son 9: allergic to fish and shellfish, pollens, pets, mould and dustmites
Youngest son, 5: allergic to peanuts, nuts, dairy, eggs, sesame, kiwi, asthma, pollens, pets, mould and dustmites


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2007 10:37 am 
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Joined: Sat Apr 16, 2005 12:09 am
Posts: 1054
This is a quote taken from Wikipedia. I don't know if this helps any...it's kind of confused me...how would someone know if the lactic acid in a particular food was milk derived or derived from a non-dairy source? Does it have to state it if it's dairy based?

Quote:
Lactic acid in food

Lactic acid is primarily found in sour milk products, such as: koumiss, leban, yogurt, kefir and some cottage cheeses. The casein in fermented milk is coagulated (curdled) by lactic acid.

Although it can be fermented from lactose (milk sugar), most commercially used lactic acid is derived from bacteria such as Bacillus acidilacti, Lactobacillus delbueckii or L. bulgaricuswhey to ferment carbohydrates from nondairy sources such as cornstarch, potatoes and molasses. Thus, although it is commonly known as "milk acid", products claiming to be vegan do sometimes feature lactic acid as an ingredient.

Lactic acid may also be found in various processed foods, usually either as a pH adjusting ingredient, or as a preservative (either as antioxidant or for control of pathogenic micro-organisms). It may also be used as a fermentation booster in rye and sourdough breads.[2]


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2007 1:35 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
_Susan_ wrote:
Karen, in the ingredients you listed for Darifree you mentioned lactic acid. I always thought that was a milk product. Isn't it?
This product looks great!


Good question. I think the correct response is sometimes, but not always.

1. FAAN says no at http://www.foodallergy.org/allergens/milk.html :

Quote:
Do these ingredients contain milk?

We frequently receive calls about the following ingredients. They do not contain milk protein and need not be restricted by someone avoiding milk:

- Calcium lactate
- Lactic acid (however, lactic acid starter culture may contain milk)
- Calcium stearoyl lactylate oleoresin
- Cocoa butter
- Sodium lactate
- Cream of tartar
- Sodium stearoyl lactylate


2. This site - http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepage ... xperts.htm - provides a bit more detail. Scroll down to "Lactic Acid". It states that lactic acid is likely dairy-free when it's not in an obvious dairy product like ice cream or cheese.

3. My understanding is that Vance's DariFree is completely free of dairy. The man who created it is allergic to dairy.

4. If you're still unsure, I would call - for both this product and any product.

K.

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2007 1:51 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
ethansmom wrote:
...how would someone know if the lactic acid in a particular food was milk derived or derived from a non-dairy source? Does it have to state it if it's dairy based?


I don't think it does at the moment. I would like to think that in the U.S. with the new FALCPA labelling law companies would have to indicate this. I will do some digging and see what I can find out.

In Canada... I'm not sure. Yoo-hoo... Lance! :)

I have seen some products say things like "lactic acid starter culture (non-dairy)" and I LOVE that.

I would call to make sure, personally. But it's good to know that it doesn't always indicate dairy.

K.

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 16, 2007 7:46 am 
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Site Admin

Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
Posts: 6455
Location: Ottawa
Here is the responce from the Darifree manufacturers:
Quote:
Hi Susan,

You will be happy to know that the lactic acid in our DariFree powdered milk alternative is derived from sugar beets.

Let me know if I can be of further assistance.
Have a great day!

Lonna
Customer Care
Vance's Foods, Inc.
(800) 497-4834

_________________
Moderator
Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jan 18, 2007 11:26 am 
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Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
So there ya go. :)

K.

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jan 18, 2007 1:22 pm 
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Joined: Mon Nov 20, 2006 7:30 pm
Posts: 19
Location: Burnaby, BC
Generally speaking, commercial lactic acid is not likely to be produced from dairy products. Our sources indicate that it is most likely produced by lactic acid fermentation of carbohydrates such as sucrose, glucose or lactose. It may also be produced synthetically via a chemical process.

Currently, there is no requirement to declare the source of lactic acid in an ingredient declaration on prepackaged foods. Under the enhanced labelling proposal for priority allergens, in the unlikely event that lactic acid is derived from milk and contains milk protein, then it would have to be declared as lactic acid (milk), clearly indicating that it is a milk derived ingredient and that milk protein may be present.

As suggested above it is good advice to continue to put these questions to the manufacturers and importers. Not only does it increase the awareness of their customers concerns but in many cases they will improve labelling on their own initiative if it meets the need of their customers and makes good business sense.

_________________
Lance Hill
Regional Food Liaison Officer
Health Canada


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jan 18, 2007 1:58 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:04 pm
Posts: 2044
Location: Gatineau, Quebec
Excellent - thanks for the additional info, Lance!

K.

_________________
Karen, proud Mom of
- DS1 (12 yrs): allergic to cashews, pistachios, Brazil nuts, potatoes, some legumes, some fish, pumpkin seeds; OAS
- DS2 (1o yrs): ana. to dairy, eggs, peanuts; asthma


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