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PostPosted: Sun Feb 11, 2007 7:41 am 
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Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 11:17 pm
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Location: Ottawa
I found this article interesting. They speak equally against the use of food and stickers. They raise some good points about what external rewards really teach our children.
http://www.canadianparents.ca/CPO/Schoo ... 69316.html

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Daughter: asthma, allergies to egg, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, most legumes (not soy) & penicillin. Developing hayfever type allergies.
Husband: no allergies
Me: allergies to some tree that flowers in May
Cat: allergic to beef, pork and lamb


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 11, 2007 9:20 am 
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Joined: Mon Jun 19, 2006 11:58 pm
Posts: 275
Location: on my pc in cp
that's a really interesting article, it makes some excellent points, and got me thinking about the whole "reward" system for the stickers thing i loved getting stickers not because i liked the reward cause i collected them when i was younger

two things it didn't mention, first the effect of a child who is trying, but still sturggling NOT getting anything for his/her efforts, my mother was always one of those parents who thought the coments from teachers were more important then grades, which taught us that trying our best was more important than being the best.

second, a constant reward system will NOT get a person ready to be in the real world, esp the work place, cause getting a reward for doing well on everything won't happen, it takes a lot of hard work to get a reward (such as a raise, a promotion ect)

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allergies - penicillin, benadryl, dust mites, enviornmental & chemical
conditions - dermatographism, eczema, well contorolled asthma
dietary - lactose intollerant, vegatarian


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 11, 2007 10:38 am 
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Joined: Sun Mar 05, 2006 1:05 pm
Posts: 528
Location: Burlington, Ontario
That's a fantastic article! We should all copy it and hand it to our school principals who, in turn, should hand it to all the teachers and parents.

It's quite an eye opener.

I have to admit I do reward my kids too at times, but I also tell them that hard work is its own reward.

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15 year old - asthmatic, allergic to cats, dogs, horses, waiting to be "officially" diagnosed for anaphylaxis
12 year old - asthmatic, allergic to tree pollen and mold, OAS
Husband - Allergic to amoxycillin
Self - Allergic to housework only


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 11, 2007 3:56 pm 
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Joined: Thu Sep 22, 2005 11:39 pm
Posts: 1141
Location: saskatchewan, canada
Here's a llink to a book review of a book that addresses similar concerns
http://www.educationreformbooks.net/punished.htm

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DD age 9 1/2 -peanuts, nuts,
DD age 7 1/2 - milk, eggs, chicken, peanuts, treenuts, cats, dogs,
DS age 2 1/2
Husband- asthma, eggs, treenuts, fish, shellfish environmental
Self - penicillan, eurithromiacin, mild laytex allergy.


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 14, 2007 12:47 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 07, 2005 6:39 pm
Posts: 2943
Location: Toronto
I find this a really interesting topic. Not sure if I'm against rewards in the younger grades per se, e.g. stickers, though the authors make some good points.

More and more I find hypocrisy in the emphasis on kids and obesity in our society, while at every turn kids are asked to participate in special 'treat days' at school or have teachers offering them goodies. I think concerns about allergy dovetaii nicely with concerns about children and healthy diets.

I don't think kids have to have food in class. I think it's just crept in and become a habit.

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Allergic to soy, peanut, shellfish, penicillin


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 14, 2007 2:06 pm 
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Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 9:38 pm
Posts: 1643
Location: Toronto
Why do rewards need to be food? My son gets rewarded by his teacher with a trip to the treasure box (items include candy, stickers, pencils, erasers, small toys) or he can get 20 minutes of computer time. We are working really hard at getting him over some difficulties. Through the week he gets check-marks if he succeeds at certain things. At the end of the week if he has them all he gets a reward at school, and one at home. The first term, his reward at home was doing a science experiment. He is no longer being rewarded for the same things, since they are no longer a problem. Or at least, they are not consistently a problem. Taking them off the *reward list* has not taken away his drive to be successful in those areas though.

Rewards can work if they are done properly.

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self: allergy to sesame seeds and peanuts
3 sons each with at least one of the following allergies: peniciilin, sulfa-based antibiotic, latex, insect bites/stings


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 14, 2007 2:39 pm 
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Joined: Wed Sep 13, 2006 10:59 am
Posts: 63
Location: Ohio
I agree with Annmarie, let's not throw the baby out with the bath water. I do a lot of work in this area, and the research is clear that rewards and consequences are both powerful in shaping behavior. What most teachers don't seem to get- and this is evidenced in the article- rewards are suppose to be used consistently in the beginning to shape behavior and then over time they should switch from continuous to more intermittent rewards. So a child eventually shouldn't expect a reward after EVERY good behavior.

I also agree that we rely too much on tokens in the classrooms. IF not done properly, kids do become too dependent on external reinforcement. But given praise is actually the most powerful reward, there is no real need to rely on food rewards to change behavior. :wink:

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2.5 year old: allergic to wheat, dairy, egg, peanut, oat, turkey, and cats
5 year old: no known allergies
Husband no known allergies
Me allergy to morphine only


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